Discussion:
KB4056894, and KB4074598 Microsoft updates problem
(too old to reply)
Maurice Helwig
2018-03-23 01:38:07 UTC
Permalink
I have just returned my computer to January 1st state by putting a
Macrium Reflect image on it.

I did this because MS updates January KB4056894 and February KB4074598
were causing problems (Failure of computer to restart after update
applied, and unacceptable slowing of the computer)

The March update (KB4088875) was presented for download and then
disappeared. I was pleased about this as apparently it would have broken
my network which uses fixed IP addresses.

All these updates require the following Registry Key to install (Put
there by Avast Free Antivirus) ---

Key="HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE"Subkey="SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\QualityCompat"


Value Name="cadca5fe-87d3-4b96-b7fb-a231484277cc"

Type="REG_DWORD”

Data="0x00000000”

Is there some way to prevent these two updates from installing --
possibly by modifying the registry key or some other method. I can live
with the Meltdown / Spectre threat for the moment.

Is turning off updates completely, a viable option -- there are two
years to go for Win 7 pro support.

Any help would be appreciated.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Paul
2018-03-23 05:17:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Maurice Helwig
I have just returned my computer to January 1st state by putting a
Macrium Reflect image on it.
I did this because MS updates January KB4056894 and February KB4074598
were causing problems (Failure of computer to restart after update
applied, and unacceptable slowing of the computer)
The March update (KB4088875) was presented for download and then
disappeared. I was pleased about this as apparently it would have broken
my network which uses fixed IP addresses.
All these updates require the following Registry Key to install (Put
there by Avast Free Antivirus) ---
Key="HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE"Subkey="SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\QualityCompat"
Value Name="cadca5fe-87d3-4b96-b7fb-a231484277cc"
Type="REG_DWORD”
Data="0x00000000”
Is there some way to prevent these two updates from installing --
possibly by modifying the registry key or some other method. I can live
with the Meltdown / Spectre threat for the moment.
Is turning off updates completely, a viable option -- there are two
years to go for Win 7 pro support.
Any help would be appreciated.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Windows 7 allows us to control updates.

Loading Image...

1) Use "Never check for updates"

2) Such a setting does not prevent you from clicking
the button in Windows Updates and scanning for updates.
In effect this is Manual Updating, where you get an
opportunity to tick boxes to select just the desired updates.

3) You can select an update in the list and "Hide" it.
There is a menu item for it. However, if the "version"
of that update is bumped by one, it will become unhidden.

*******

Windows 10 doesn't have the "Never check for updates" menu.

Windows 10 has a separate utility called "wu-show-hide.diagcab",
which is an absolutely horrible and absurd way to do things.

https://support.microsoft.com/en-ca/help/3183922/how-to-temporarily-prevent-a-windows-update-from-reinstalling-in-windo

Just be glad you're on Windows 7 :-)

Paul
Maurice Helwig
2018-03-23 05:50:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul
Post by Maurice Helwig
I have just returned my computer to January 1st state by putting a
Macrium Reflect image on it.
I did this because MS updates January KB4056894 and February KB4074598
were causing problems (Failure of computer to restart after update
applied, and unacceptable slowing of the computer)
The March update (KB4088875) was presented for download and then
disappeared. I was pleased about this as apparently it would have
broken my network which uses fixed IP addresses.
All these updates require the following Registry Key to install (Put
there by Avast Free Antivirus) ---
Key="HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE"Subkey="SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\QualityCompat"
Value Name="cadca5fe-87d3-4b96-b7fb-a231484277cc"
Type="REG_DWORD”
Data="0x00000000”
Is there some way to prevent these two updates from installing --
possibly by modifying the registry key or some other method. I can
live with the Meltdown / Spectre threat for the moment.
Is turning off updates completely, a viable option -- there are two
years to go for Win 7 pro support.
Any help would be appreciated.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Windows 7 allows us to control updates.
https://www.isumsoft.com/it/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/never-check-for-updates.png
1) Use "Never check for updates"
2) Such a setting does not prevent you from clicking
   the button in Windows Updates and scanning for updates.
   In effect this is Manual Updating, where you get an
   opportunity to tick boxes to select just the desired updates.
3) You can select an update in the list and "Hide" it.
   There is a menu item for it. However, if the "version"
   of that update is bumped by one, it will become unhidden.
*******
Windows 10 doesn't have the "Never check for updates" menu.
Windows 10 has a separate utility called "wu-show-hide.diagcab",
which is an absolutely horrible and absurd way to do things.
https://support.microsoft.com/en-ca/help/3183922/how-to-temporarily-prevent-a-windows-update-from-reinstalling-in-windo
Just be glad you're on Windows 7 :-)
   Paul
Thanks for the reply Paul.
I can do as you say but with the rollup type of updates now being used
in win 7, If I install March 2018 update I get the January 2018 and
February 2018 updates as well which I do not want.
Is there any way of selecting what updates I want without getting the
unwanted ones all rolled up into one.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Paul
2018-03-23 06:03:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Maurice Helwig
Post by Paul
Post by Maurice Helwig
I have just returned my computer to January 1st state by putting a
Macrium Reflect image on it.
I did this because MS updates January KB4056894 and February
KB4074598 were causing problems (Failure of computer to restart after
update applied, and unacceptable slowing of the computer)
The March update (KB4088875) was presented for download and then
disappeared. I was pleased about this as apparently it would have
broken my network which uses fixed IP addresses.
All these updates require the following Registry Key to install (Put
there by Avast Free Antivirus) ---
Key="HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE"Subkey="SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\QualityCompat"
Value Name="cadca5fe-87d3-4b96-b7fb-a231484277cc"
Type="REG_DWORD”
Data="0x00000000”
Is there some way to prevent these two updates from installing --
possibly by modifying the registry key or some other method. I can
live with the Meltdown / Spectre threat for the moment.
Is turning off updates completely, a viable option -- there are two
years to go for Win 7 pro support.
Any help would be appreciated.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Windows 7 allows us to control updates.
https://www.isumsoft.com/it/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/never-check-for-updates.png
1) Use "Never check for updates"
2) Such a setting does not prevent you from clicking
the button in Windows Updates and scanning for updates.
In effect this is Manual Updating, where you get an
opportunity to tick boxes to select just the desired updates.
3) You can select an update in the list and "Hide" it.
There is a menu item for it. However, if the "version"
of that update is bumped by one, it will become unhidden.
*******
Windows 10 doesn't have the "Never check for updates" menu.
Windows 10 has a separate utility called "wu-show-hide.diagcab",
which is an absolutely horrible and absurd way to do things.
https://support.microsoft.com/en-ca/help/3183922/how-to-temporarily-prevent-a-windows-update-from-reinstalling-in-windo
Just be glad you're on Windows 7 :-)
Paul
Thanks for the reply Paul.
I can do as you say but with the rollup type of updates now being used
in win 7, If I install March 2018 update I get the January 2018 and
February 2018 updates as well which I do not want.
Is there any way of selecting what updates I want without getting the
unwanted ones all rolled up into one.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Just make a backup and install March.

Did it boot ?

Done.

The Jan. and Feb. contents get "fixed" before
being shoved into March. A rollup is not exactly
equivalent to doing them separately. There are
possible temporal differences.

Paul
Maurice Helwig
2018-03-23 06:29:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul
Post by Maurice Helwig
Post by Paul
Post by Maurice Helwig
I have just returned my computer to January 1st state by putting a
Macrium Reflect image on it.
I did this because MS updates January KB4056894 and February
KB4074598 were causing problems (Failure of computer to restart
after update applied, and unacceptable slowing of the computer)
The March update (KB4088875) was presented for download and then
disappeared. I was pleased about this as apparently it would have
broken my network which uses fixed IP addresses.
All these updates require the following Registry Key to install (Put
there by Avast Free Antivirus) ---
Key="HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE"Subkey="SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\QualityCompat"
Value Name="cadca5fe-87d3-4b96-b7fb-a231484277cc"
Type="REG_DWORD”
Data="0x00000000”
Is there some way to prevent these two updates from installing --
possibly by modifying the registry key or some other method. I can
live with the Meltdown / Spectre threat for the moment.
Is turning off updates completely, a viable option -- there are two
years to go for Win 7 pro support.
Any help would be appreciated.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Windows 7 allows us to control updates.
https://www.isumsoft.com/it/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/never-check-for-updates.png
1) Use "Never check for updates"
2) Such a setting does not prevent you from clicking
    the button in Windows Updates and scanning for updates.
    In effect this is Manual Updating, where you get an
    opportunity to tick boxes to select just the desired updates.
3) You can select an update in the list and "Hide" it.
    There is a menu item for it. However, if the "version"
    of that update is bumped by one, it will become unhidden.
*******
Windows 10 doesn't have the "Never check for updates" menu.
Windows 10 has a separate utility called "wu-show-hide.diagcab",
which is an absolutely horrible and absurd way to do things.
https://support.microsoft.com/en-ca/help/3183922/how-to-temporarily-prevent-a-windows-update-from-reinstalling-in-windo
Just be glad you're on Windows 7 :-)
    Paul
Thanks for the reply Paul.
I can do as you say but with the rollup type of updates now being used
in win 7, If I install March 2018 update I get the January 2018 and
February 2018 updates as well which I do not want.
Is there any way of selecting what updates I want without getting the
unwanted ones all rolled up into one.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Just make a backup and install March.
Did it boot ?
Done.
The Jan. and Feb. contents get "fixed" before
being shoved into March. A rollup is not exactly
equivalent to doing them separately. There are
possible temporal differences.
   Paul
Thanks Paul

So if I wait a month or two the problems will be fixed in the later
Rollup. That explains why some folks are about three months behind in
their updates. I might try that on a regular basis.

Do you know anything about the reg key and possibly changing its
settings or removing it all together. What would happen.

~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~
Paul
2018-03-23 15:24:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Maurice Helwig
Thanks Paul
So if I wait a month or two the problems will be fixed in the later
Rollup. That explains why some folks are about three months behind in
their updates. I might try that on a regular basis.
Do you know anything about the reg key and possibly changing its
settings or removing it all together. What would happen.
~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~
As of today, that reg key in Windows 10, has been disabled.
It no longer gates updates. April 2018 Patch Tuesday does not need
to check for it.

However, for Windows 7, the same promise was not made. We
cannot remove the registry key in question quite yet. And
no reason for this was stated.

Paul
jetjock
2018-03-23 18:57:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul
Post by Maurice Helwig
Thanks Paul
So if I wait a month or two the problems will be fixed in the later
Rollup. That explains why some folks are about three months behind in
their updates. I might try that on a regular basis.
Do you know anything about the reg key and possibly changing its
settings or removing it all together. What would happen.
~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~
As of today, that reg key in Windows 10, has been disabled.
It no longer gates updates. April 2018 Patch Tuesday does not need
to check for it.
Was that something MS did, or you? If you, how? By "gates", what did
you mean?
Post by Paul
However, for Windows 7, the same promise was not made. We
cannot remove the registry key in question quite yet. And
no reason for this was stated.
Paul
Paul
2018-03-23 20:24:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by jetjock
Post by Paul
Post by Maurice Helwig
Thanks Paul
So if I wait a month or two the problems will be fixed in the later
Rollup. That explains why some folks are about three months behind in
their updates. I might try that on a regular basis.
Do you know anything about the reg key and possibly changing its
settings or removing it all together. What would happen.
~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~
As of today, that reg key in Windows 10, has been disabled.
It no longer gates updates. April 2018 Patch Tuesday does not need
to check for it.
Was that something MS did, or you? If you, how? By "gates", what did
you mean?
Post by Paul
However, for Windows 7, the same promise was not made. We
cannot remove the registry key in question quite yet. And
no reason for this was stated.
Paul
I don't have a primer on the mechanics here for those.

And I've not really seen evidence anyway, that adding that
registry key is making that much difference. Maybe someone
else got a positive result ? I noticed on my test setup
here, that once I installed MSEInstall in Windows 7,
I could get the 2018-02 Cumulative to show up in
Windows Update for Windows 7. I didn't try setting the
reg key manually to see if the same thing would happen.
I can't be 100% sure that registry key is all that is needed.

Your 2018-04 April Update will install, when Microsoft is
good and ready. There's no rush. There's still no sign of
an imminent thread from Meltdown/Spectre. About 200 samples
have shown up in Virustotal, showing that the Black Hats
are working on it. But no virulent and effective samples
have been seen. I haven't read the news for today yet...

Paul
FredW
2018-03-23 13:56:18 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 23 Mar 2018 15:50:05 +1000, Maurice Helwig
Post by Maurice Helwig
Thanks for the reply Paul.
I can do as you say but with the rollup type of updates now being used
in win 7, If I install March 2018 update I get the January 2018 and
February 2018 updates as well which I do not want.
Is there any way of selecting what updates I want without getting the
unwanted ones all rolled up into one.
In stead of the Monthly Rollup, I do the Monthly Security Only updates.
Monthly Security Only updates are not cumulative.

http://wu.krelay.de/en/monthly.htm
--
Fred W. (nld)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-03-23 16:53:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by FredW
On Fri, 23 Mar 2018 15:50:05 +1000, Maurice Helwig
Post by Maurice Helwig
Thanks for the reply Paul.
I can do as you say but with the rollup type of updates now being used
in win 7, If I install March 2018 update I get the January 2018 and
February 2018 updates as well which I do not want.
Is there any way of selecting what updates I want without getting the
unwanted ones all rolled up into one.
In stead of the Monthly Rollup, I do the Monthly Security Only updates.
Monthly Security Only updates are not cumulative.
http://wu.krelay.de/en/monthly.htm
Oh, are they not?

If they really aren't, _are_ there cumulative security ones available
somewhere, or does someone who has turned off updates but wants security
ones have to go back to when he last did them, and laboriously work
forwards from there, installing lots of them?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Veni, Vidi, Vera (I came, I saw, we'll meet again) - Mik from S+AS Limited
(***@saslimited.demon.co.uk), 1998
FredW
2018-03-23 21:30:50 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 23 Mar 2018 16:53:30 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by FredW
On Fri, 23 Mar 2018 15:50:05 +1000, Maurice Helwig
Post by Maurice Helwig
Thanks for the reply Paul.
I can do as you say but with the rollup type of updates now being used
in win 7, If I install March 2018 update I get the January 2018 and
February 2018 updates as well which I do not want.
Is there any way of selecting what updates I want without getting the
unwanted ones all rolled up into one.
In stead of the Monthly Rollup, I do the Monthly Security Only updates.
Monthly Security Only updates are not cumulative.
http://wu.krelay.de/en/monthly.htm
Oh, are they not?
If they really aren't, _are_ there cumulative security ones available
somewhere, or does someone who has turned off updates but wants security
ones have to go back to when he last did them, and laboriously work
forwards from there, installing lots of them?
Yes (to second option).
In above link you can find all security only updates starting in 2016.

;-)
--
Fred W. (nld)
David E. Ross
2018-03-23 16:52:40 UTC
Permalink
On 3/22/2018 6:38 PM, Maurice Helwig wrote [in part]:

[snipped]
Post by Maurice Helwig
The March update (KB4088875) was presented for download and then
disappeared. I was pleased about this as apparently it would have broken
my network which uses fixed IP addresses.
[snipped]

KB4088875 showed up in my Windows Update. I went to the Web page for
additional details. That page cited several adverse "Known issues in
this update" that I consider seriously unacceptable. I marked the
update as "Hidden".
--
David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/>

President Trump: Please stop using Twitter. We need
to hear your voice and see you talking. We need to know
when your message is really your own and not your attorney's.
Maurice Helwig
2018-03-23 22:36:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by David E. Ross
[snipped]
Post by Maurice Helwig
The March update (KB4088875) was presented for download and then
disappeared. I was pleased about this as apparently it would have broken
my network which uses fixed IP addresses.
[snipped]
KB4088875 showed up in my Windows Update. I went to the Web page for
additional details. That page cited several adverse "Known issues in
this update" that I consider seriously unacceptable. I marked the
update as "Hidden".
This update completely destroys a network using fixed IP addresses as I
am using. Since I re imaged my computer to Jan 1st 2018 It had not
appeared. I think MS may have pulled it (can anyone confirm this)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
John K.Eason
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
Permalink
*Date:* Sat, 24 Mar 2018 08:36:53 +1000
Post by David E. Ross
[snipped]
Post by Maurice Helwig
The March update (KB4088875) was presented for download and then
disappeared. I was pleased about this as apparently it would
have broken
Post by David E. Ross
Post by Maurice Helwig
my network which uses fixed IP addresses.
[snipped]
KB4088875 showed up in my Windows Update. I went to the Web page for
additional details. That page cited several adverse "Known
issues in
this update" that I consider seriously unacceptable. I marked the
update as "Hidden".
This update completely destroys a network using fixed IP addresses
as I am using. Since I re imaged my computer to Jan 1st 2018 It had
not appeared. I think MS may have pulled it (can anyone confirm
this)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
MS have released a replacement for part of the March rollup this evening (UK time),
but it looks as if it only includes IE11. It's KB4096040. See:
http://tinyurl.com/yavtn8yh
Available from the Catalog at
https://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=KB4096040
--
Regards
John (***@jeasonNoSpam.cix.co.uk) Remove the obvious to reply...
Maurice Helwig
2018-03-24 00:52:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by John K.Eason
*Date:* Sat, 24 Mar 2018 08:36:53 +1000
Post by David E. Ross
[snipped]
Post by Maurice Helwig
The March update (KB4088875) was presented for download and then
disappeared. I was pleased about this as apparently it would
have broken
Post by David E. Ross
Post by Maurice Helwig
my network which uses fixed IP addresses.
[snipped]
KB4088875 showed up in my Windows Update. I went to the Web page for
additional details. That page cited several adverse "Known
issues in
this update" that I consider seriously unacceptable. I marked the
update as "Hidden".
This update completely destroys a network using fixed IP addresses
as I am using. Since I re imaged my computer to Jan 1st 2018 It had
not appeared. I think MS may have pulled it (can anyone confirm
this)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
MS have released a replacement for part of the March rollup this evening (UK time),
http://tinyurl.com/yavtn8yh
Available from the Catalog at
https://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=KB4096040
Thank you. I will look out for it. I may take a few days to present
itself for instalation.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Brian Gregory
2018-03-24 01:13:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Maurice Helwig
This update completely destroys a network using fixed IP addresses as I
am using. Since I re imaged my computer to Jan 1st 2018 It had not
appeared. I think MS may have pulled it (can anyone confirm this)
Yes it is pulled. But no it doesn't necessarily cause problems with PCs
that are configured with fixed IP addresses. I've installed it on 4 PCs
configured with fixed IPs at work with no problem caused at all. Don't
believe every scaremonger's blog you read online, people guess what the
problem is. It's often nowhere near as simple as they guess.
--
Brian Gregory (in England).
Maurice Helwig
2018-03-24 01:22:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brian Gregory
Post by Maurice Helwig
This update completely destroys a network using fixed IP addresses as
I am using. Since I re imaged my computer to Jan 1st 2018 It had not
appeared. I think MS may have pulled it (can anyone confirm this)
Yes it is pulled. But no it doesn't necessarily cause problems with PCs
that are configured with fixed IP addresses. I've installed it on 4 PCs
configured with fixed IPs at work with no problem caused at all. Don't
believe every scaremonger's blog you read online, people guess what the
problem is. It's often nowhere near as simple as they guess.
Yes There are scaremongers out there but MS are not doing their job
properly either. A little more explanation as to what the updates do
would be very helpful. Their explanations are brief and confusing which
only adds to the problem. I don't want to be spending all day playing
with updates.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~
mike
2018-03-24 02:50:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Maurice Helwig
Post by Brian Gregory
Post by Maurice Helwig
This update completely destroys a network using fixed IP addresses as
I am using. Since I re imaged my computer to Jan 1st 2018 It had not
appeared. I think MS may have pulled it (can anyone confirm this)
Yes it is pulled. But no it doesn't necessarily cause problems with
PCs that are configured with fixed IP addresses. I've installed it on
4 PCs configured with fixed IPs at work with no problem caused at all.
Don't believe every scaremonger's blog you read online, people guess
what the problem is. It's often nowhere near as simple as they guess.
Yes There are scaremongers out there but MS are not doing their job
properly either. A little more explanation as to what the updates do
would be very helpful. Their explanations are brief and confusing which
only adds to the problem. I don't want to be spending all day playing
with updates.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Problems happen where you don't look.
Things you look at, evaluate, stress test in many different configurations,
are less likely to cause problems in the AREAS YOU TESTED.
The problem with something as huge and complex as an operating
system is that there's no way to test everything in every
possible configuration. Tiny changes can have far-reaching
consequences.

I just spent several days trying to figure out why my laptop
wouldn't wake from sleep in win10, or win7, or XP.
Turned out to be a BIOS problem...but not just any BIOS.
If you updated to the latest, you bricked the OS...
unless you had preinstalled some driver...or so they say.
I wasn't willing to risk it and the mid-BIOS fixed my problem.
How would the developer known about that from his limited
view of the biosphere?

The issues with disclosing update contents are many:
Many of us would not understand it anyway.
Exposing the details of a vulnerability may help hackers.
MS could not sneak in 'features' that we wouldn't accept if we had a
choice.

If you think MS is evil for that, you've never
read any document describing a law. Who could have predicted
that my water bill would eventually have charges for street repair and
parks and recreation? I'm sure it was buried somewhere in the
bill to fund schools. Somehow it never made it into the description
on the ballot.

The internet is a contentious place. NO MATTER WHAT YOU SAY,
there's a large contingent of complainers itching to discuss how
horrible you are.

Once we decide to embrace the fact that MS owns us, having every
system the same is a good thing for everybody...and a LOT better
for MS.

Be glad you're still using win7. Win10 continuous change is
approaching the chaos of linux. Wonder if anybody has tried to
estimate the total $$ cost to the economy of managing the chaos.

"Sorry mam, I understand your house is on fire...I'll dispatch
the fire department as soon as windows finishes updating."
Maurice Helwig
2018-03-24 04:14:41 UTC
Permalink
Be glad you're still using win7.  Win10 continuous change is
approaching the chaos of linux.  Wonder if anybody has tried to
estimate the total  $$ cost to the economy of managing the chaos.
Thanks for your input. The problems of continuous change in windows 10
is just the reason why I have not gone there. I think that the 5th major
update of win 10 is due out in April. my son has moved to Linux Mint to
get away from it all, but I wonder.......
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~
mike
2018-03-24 07:22:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Maurice Helwig
Post by mike
Be glad you're still using win7. Win10 continuous change is
approaching the chaos of linux. Wonder if anybody has tried to
estimate the total $$ cost to the economy of managing the chaos.
Thanks for your input. The problems of continuous change in windows 10
is just the reason why I have not gone there. I think that the 5th major
update of win 10 is due out in April. my son has moved to Linux Mint to
get away from it all, but I wonder.......
Linux just puts you into a larger domain of different chaos.
If I lived in a bubble and didn't have to be compatible with
90% of the desktop users or use software that isn't compatible
Linux would be fine for me.

But statistics can be deceiving.
I estimate that 99+% of the stuff I do regularly could be done
effectively with linux.
BUT
It's rare that I go more than a few hours before I want
something I can't get with linux.
By can't get, I mean that the function I want is unavailable
in a manner to which I've become accustomed, using data files
that I have and might interact with other non-geeks.

Sure, I can do schematic entry with linux. Problem is that
I can't modify the schematics I created decades ago
using windows apps that still work.

Win10 is mired in chaos. Eventually, we'll all have to move to it.
The good news is that we're finding ways to prevent the chaos
from dominating our computer at inopportune times. That's a BIG
step. Not big enough to get me to change from win7...yet...but
the day will come when the benefits exceed the costs.

I have several win 10 computers and enough experience to suggest
that I could survive a switch to it.

If you want to get off the windows train, now is as good a time
as any to switch to linux. History (windows me, vista, windows 8, etc)
suggests that most people will not jump ship. I've tried more than
once and it's just not worth the hassle. Inertia is a heavy thing.
Maurice Helwig
2018-03-25 04:09:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by mike
Post by Maurice Helwig
Be glad you're still using win7.  Win10 continuous change is
approaching the chaos of linux.  Wonder if anybody has tried to
estimate the total  $$ cost to the economy of managing the chaos.
Thanks for your input. The problems of continuous change in windows 10
is just the reason why I have not gone there. I think that the 5th major
update of win 10 is due out in April. my son has moved to Linux Mint to
get away from it all, but I wonder.......
Linux just puts you into a larger domain of different chaos.
If I lived in a bubble and didn't have to be compatible with
90% of the desktop users or use software that isn't compatible
Linux would be fine for me.
But statistics can be deceiving.
I estimate that 99+% of the stuff I do regularly could be done
effectively with linux.
BUT
It's rare that I go more than a few hours before I want
something I can't get with linux.
By can't get, I mean that the function I want is unavailable
in a manner to which I've become accustomed, using data files
that I have and might interact with other non-geeks.
Sure, I can do schematic entry with linux.  Problem is that
I can't modify the schematics I created decades ago
using windows apps that still work.
Win10 is mired in chaos.  Eventually, we'll all have to move to it.
The good news is that we're finding ways to prevent the chaos
from dominating our computer at inopportune times.  That's a BIG
step.  Not big enough to get me to change from win7...yet...but
the day will come when the benefits exceed the costs.
I have several win 10 computers and enough experience to suggest
that I could survive a switch to it.
If you want to get off the windows train, now is as good a time
as any to switch to linux.  History (windows me, vista, windows 8, etc)
suggests that most people will not jump ship.  I've tried more than
once and it's just not worth the hassle.  Inertia is a heavy thing.
Yes, what you have learned is always easier than something new and
different. My son has successfully made the transition to linux mint.
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Thip
2018-03-23 19:18:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Maurice Helwig
I have just returned my computer to January 1st state by putting a
Macrium Reflect image on it.
I did this because MS updates January KB4056894 and February KB4074598
were causing problems (Failure of computer to restart after update
applied, and unacceptable slowing of the computer)
The March update (KB4088875) was presented for download and then
disappeared. I was pleased about this as apparently it would have broken
my network which uses fixed IP addresses.
All these updates require the following Registry Key to install (Put
there by Avast Free Antivirus) ---
Key="HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE"Subkey="SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\QualityCompat"
Value Name="cadca5fe-87d3-4b96-b7fb-a231484277cc"
Type="REG_DWORD”
Data="0x00000000”
Is there some way to prevent these two updates from installing --
possibly by modifying the registry key or some other method. I can live
with the Meltdown / Spectre threat for the moment.
Is turning off updates completely, a viable option -- there are two
years to go for Win 7 pro support.
Any help would be appreciated.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I use WSUS offline http://www.wsusoffline.net/. I checked "Security
Only" and "Windows Defender" and let it roll. Might help you.
Maurice Helwig
2018-03-23 23:32:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Maurice Helwig
I have just returned my computer to January 1st state by putting a
Macrium Reflect image on it.
I did this because MS updates January KB4056894 and February KB4074598
were causing problems (Failure of computer to restart after update
applied, and unacceptable slowing of the computer)
The March update (KB4088875) was presented for download and then
disappeared. I was pleased about this as apparently it would have
broken my network which uses fixed IP addresses.
All these updates require the following Registry Key to install (Put
there by Avast Free Antivirus) ---
Key="HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE"Subkey="SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\QualityCompat"
Value Name="cadca5fe-87d3-4b96-b7fb-a231484277cc"
Type="REG_DWORD”
Data="0x00000000”
Is there some way to prevent these two updates from installing --
possibly by modifying the registry key or some other method. I can
live with the Meltdown / Spectre threat for the moment.
Is turning off updates completely, a viable option -- there are two
years to go for Win 7 pro support.
Any help would be appreciated.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I use WSUS offline http://www.wsusoffline.net/.  I checked "Security
Only" and "Windows Defender" and let it roll.  Might help you.
Thank you for the wsusoffline link. I will look at that.
Can I set up windows 7 pro to receive "Security only" updates, or does
one have to use wsusoffline or do it manually.

Security updates is really all I need. but they must not break my
computer in the process. The quality of the updates is of course MS
responsibility. I don't think they are doing a good job at all lately
and getting worse by the month.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
2018-03-24 01:08:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Maurice Helwig
I have just returned my computer to January 1st state by putting a
Macrium Reflect image on it.
I did this because MS updates January KB4056894 and February KB4074598
were causing problems (Failure of computer to restart after update
applied, and unacceptable slowing of the computer)
The March update (KB4088875) was presented for download and then
disappeared. I was pleased about this as apparently it would have
broken my network which uses fixed IP addresses.
All these updates require the following Registry Key to install (Put
there by Avast Free Antivirus) ---
Key="HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE"Subkey="SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\QualityCompat"
Value Name="cadca5fe-87d3-4b96-b7fb-a231484277cc"
Type="REG_DWORD”
Data="0x00000000”
Is there some way to prevent these two updates from installing --
possibly by modifying the registry key or some other method. I can
live with the Meltdown / Spectre threat for the moment.
Is turning off updates completely, a viable option -- there are two
years to go for Win 7 pro support.
Any help would be appreciated.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I use WSUS offline http://www.wsusoffline.net/.  I checked "Security
Only" and "Windows Defender" and let it roll.  Might help you.
Just a question --

I have just downloaded and run WSUS offline.
If I apply the updates (security only) to my existing win 7 installation
(which is up to date to December 2017) will WSUS install all the updates
it has downloaded, or only the ones that are not installed, ie will it
check for existing updates installed.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Thip
2018-03-24 12:47:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Maurice Helwig
Post by Maurice Helwig
I have just returned my computer to January 1st state by putting a
Macrium Reflect image on it.
I did this because MS updates January KB4056894 and February
KB4074598 were causing problems (Failure of computer to restart after
update applied, and unacceptable slowing of the computer)
The March update (KB4088875) was presented for download and then
disappeared. I was pleased about this as apparently it would have
broken my network which uses fixed IP addresses.
All these updates require the following Registry Key to install (Put
there by Avast Free Antivirus) ---
Key="HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE"Subkey="SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\QualityCompat"
Value Name="cadca5fe-87d3-4b96-b7fb-a231484277cc"
Type="REG_DWORD”
Data="0x00000000”
Is there some way to prevent these two updates from installing --
possibly by modifying the registry key or some other method. I can
live with the Meltdown / Spectre threat for the moment.
Is turning off updates completely, a viable option -- there are two
years to go for Win 7 pro support.
Any help would be appreciated.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I use WSUS offline http://www.wsusoffline.net/.  I checked "Security
Only" and "Windows Defender" and let it roll.  Might help you.
Just a question --
I have just downloaded and run WSUS offline.
If I apply the updates (security only) to my existing win 7 installation
(which is up to date to December 2017) will WSUS install all the updates
it has downloaded, or only the ones that are not installed, ie will it
check for existing updates installed.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~
It will check your current updates and only download/apply those you
don't have.
Maurice Helwig
2018-03-25 04:13:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Thip
Post by Maurice Helwig
Post by Maurice Helwig
I have just returned my computer to January 1st state by putting a
Macrium Reflect image on it.
I did this because MS updates January KB4056894 and February
KB4074598 were causing problems (Failure of computer to restart
after update applied, and unacceptable slowing of the computer)
The March update (KB4088875) was presented for download and then
disappeared. I was pleased about this as apparently it would have
broken my network which uses fixed IP addresses.
All these updates require the following Registry Key to install (Put
there by Avast Free Antivirus) ---
Key="HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE"Subkey="SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\QualityCompat"
Value Name="cadca5fe-87d3-4b96-b7fb-a231484277cc"
Type="REG_DWORD”
Data="0x00000000”
Is there some way to prevent these two updates from installing --
possibly by modifying the registry key or some other method. I can
live with the Meltdown / Spectre threat for the moment.
Is turning off updates completely, a viable option -- there are two
years to go for Win 7 pro support.
Any help would be appreciated.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I use WSUS offline http://www.wsusoffline.net/.  I checked "Security
Only" and "Windows Defender" and let it roll.  Might help you.
Just a question --
I have just downloaded and run WSUS offline.
If I apply the updates (security only) to my existing win 7
installation (which is up to date to December 2017) will WSUS install
all the updates it has downloaded, or only the ones that are not
installed, ie will it check for existing updates installed.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~
It will check your current updates and only download/apply those you
don't have.
Thanks -- I will have a play with it. It seems to have some advantages.
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Brian Gregory
2018-03-24 01:03:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Maurice Helwig
The March update (KB4088875) was presented for download and then
disappeared. I was pleased about this as apparently it would have broken
my network which uses fixed IP addresses.
Didn't break the four PCs I installed it on at work, all four have fixed
IPs.
--
Brian Gregory (in England).
Maurice Helwig
2018-03-24 01:14:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brian Gregory
Post by Maurice Helwig
The March update (KB4088875) was presented for download and then
disappeared. I was pleased about this as apparently it would have
broken my network which uses fixed IP addresses.
Didn't break the four PCs I installed it on at work, all four have fixed
IPs.
Thanks for the info.
I was not prepared to take the risk when I read about the problem, and
then the update disappeared, so I presumed that it was removed for
modifications by MS.

~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
2018-03-25 04:48:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Maurice Helwig
Post by Brian Gregory
Post by Maurice Helwig
The March update (KB4088875) was presented for download and then
disappeared. I was pleased about this as apparently it would have
broken my network which uses fixed IP addresses.
Didn't break the four PCs I installed it on at work, all four have
fixed IPs.
Thanks for the info.
I was not prepared to take the risk when I read about the problem, and
then the update disappeared, so I presumed that it was removed for
modifications by MS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~
This morning (Sunday 2018-03-25) an optional update was presented for me
to install --

2018-03 Preview of Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows 7 for x64-based
Systems (KB4088881)

I do not install Preview updates ever but a look at the MS information
site on this KB shows that the IP address issue is acknowledged by MS
and is yet to be fixed.

http://support.microsoft.com/help/4088881

While others may have installed KB4088875 without any network problems,
I am not prepared to do so until it is fixed.
Have a look at --
https://www.askwoody.com/category/microsoft-windows-patches-security/

Can anyone tell me how to remove the "ALLOW REGKEY" which is required
for these updates to install.
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Paul
2018-03-25 05:31:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Maurice Helwig
Post by Maurice Helwig
Post by Brian Gregory
Post by Maurice Helwig
The March update (KB4088875) was presented for download and then
disappeared. I was pleased about this as apparently it would have
broken my network which uses fixed IP addresses.
Didn't break the four PCs I installed it on at work, all four have
fixed IPs.
Thanks for the info.
I was not prepared to take the risk when I read about the problem, and
then the update disappeared, so I presumed that it was removed for
modifications by MS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~
This morning (Sunday 2018-03-25) an optional update was presented for me
to install --
2018-03 Preview of Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows 7 for x64-based
Systems (KB4088881)
I do not install Preview updates ever but a look at the MS information
site on this KB shows that the IP address issue is acknowledged by MS
and is yet to be fixed.
http://support.microsoft.com/help/4088881
While others may have installed KB4088875 without any network problems,
I am not prepared to do so until it is fixed.
Have a look at --
https://www.askwoody.com/category/microsoft-windows-patches-security/
Can anyone tell me how to remove the "ALLOW REGKEY" which is required
for these updates to install.
I thought Windows 7 had a Windows Update setting that basically
disabled Windows Update. Then, you could click the button to have
Windows Update scan for updates, then go through the list manually,
and selected the updates you want.

That should give sufficient control without "hiding" the updates.

AFAIK, if you hide an update and the version number of the update
changes, the update will be re-offered. This is one reason that
hiding updates is not "ultimately effective". If you leave Windows
Update in one of its Automatic modes, you could end up installing
an update you had hidden previously.

Just switch WU off, make a list of KB number versus the problems
with it, and you can review the state next month, of what is safe
to install.

Paul
Maurice Helwig
2018-03-25 06:52:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul
Post by Maurice Helwig
Post by Maurice Helwig
Post by Brian Gregory
Post by Maurice Helwig
The March update (KB4088875) was presented for download and then
disappeared. I was pleased about this as apparently it would have
broken my network which uses fixed IP addresses.
Didn't break the four PCs I installed it on at work, all four have
fixed IPs.
Thanks for the info.
I was not prepared to take the risk when I read about the problem,
and then the update disappeared, so I presumed that it was removed
for modifications by MS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~
This morning (Sunday 2018-03-25) an optional update was presented for
me to install --
2018-03 Preview of Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows 7 for x64-based
Systems (KB4088881)
I do not install Preview updates ever but a look at the MS information
site on this KB shows that the IP address issue is acknowledged by MS
and is yet to be fixed.
http://support.microsoft.com/help/4088881
While others may have installed KB4088875 without any network
problems, I am not prepared to do so until it is fixed.
Have a look at --
https://www.askwoody.com/category/microsoft-windows-patches-security/
Can anyone tell me how to remove the "ALLOW REGKEY" which is required
for these updates to install.
I thought Windows 7 had a Windows Update setting that basically
disabled Windows Update. Then, you could click the button to have
Windows Update scan for updates, then go  through the list manually,
and selected the updates you want.
That should give sufficient control without "hiding" the updates.
AFAIK, if you hide an update and the version number of the update
changes, the update will be re-offered. This is one reason that
hiding updates is not "ultimately effective". If you leave Windows
Update in one of its Automatic modes, you could end up installing
an update you had hidden previously.
Just switch WU off, make a list of KB number versus the problems
with it, and you can review the state next month, of what is safe
to install.
   Paul
Yes my windows 7 computer has a "Never check for updates (Not
Recommended)" setting and that is where it is now set, so that I can
avoid any accidental installations of unwanted updates.

And yes hiding updates needs to be handled carefully as you have said.

I would like to continue with updates but the quality of them coming out
of MS is a worry. I am thinking seriously about setting all my computers
to "Never check for updates (Not Recommended)" and forgetting about
updating all together.

This might not be wise but It may be the only option at the moment.
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~
mike
2018-03-25 06:54:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul
Post by Maurice Helwig
Post by Maurice Helwig
Post by Brian Gregory
Post by Maurice Helwig
The March update (KB4088875) was presented for download and then
disappeared. I was pleased about this as apparently it would have
broken my network which uses fixed IP addresses.
Didn't break the four PCs I installed it on at work, all four have
fixed IPs.
Thanks for the info.
I was not prepared to take the risk when I read about the problem,
and then the update disappeared, so I presumed that it was removed
for modifications by MS.
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~
This morning (Sunday 2018-03-25) an optional update was presented for
me to install --
2018-03 Preview of Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows 7 for x64-based
Systems (KB4088881)
I do not install Preview updates ever but a look at the MS information
site on this KB shows that the IP address issue is acknowledged by MS
and is yet to be fixed.
http://support.microsoft.com/help/4088881
While others may have installed KB4088875 without any network
problems, I am not prepared to do so until it is fixed.
Have a look at --
https://www.askwoody.com/category/microsoft-windows-patches-security/
Can anyone tell me how to remove the "ALLOW REGKEY" which is required
for these updates to install.
I thought Windows 7 had a Windows Update setting that basically
disabled Windows Update. Then, you could click the button to have
Windows Update scan for updates, then go through the list manually,
and selected the updates you want.
That should give sufficient control without "hiding" the updates.
That does work. But deciding which ones to hide is a daunting task.
All I could do is rely on lists posted by others.
Post by Paul
AFAIK, if you hide an update and the version number of the update
changes, the update will be re-offered. This is one reason that
hiding updates is not "ultimately effective". If you leave Windows
Update in one of its Automatic modes, you could end up installing
an update you had hidden previously.
Just switch WU off, make a list of KB number versus the problems
with it, and you can review the state next month, of what is safe
to install.
Paul
Paul
2018-03-25 13:25:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by mike
That does work. But deciding which ones to hide is a daunting task.
All I could do is rely on lists posted by others.
That's how the current Quality Assurance system works.

On Patch Tuesday, unsuspecting users (with Windows Update set to
full Auto) "test" the latest Cumulative Updates for us.

If a machine is bricked, or some strange behavior is
seen, it's reported in popular forums (or on USENET) so others
can benefit from the misfortune of the testers.

Then, Microsoft pulls the update, Microsoft visits the forum and
gets the list of problems, the developer works on it and re-releases
it. This avoids the need to dog-food the updates on Microsoft desktops,
or pay testers on the premises to do the testing.

The fact that Microsoft has the cheek to release Preview updates
for the month after, tells you how institutionalized this thinking is.
"We'll catch it in Field Test".

*******

How should a user respond to this kind of delivery system ?

Barge pole, 10 foot long.

Apply the updates, sure. But some time after they're released.

Paul
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-03-25 15:50:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul
Post by mike
That does work. But deciding which ones to hide is a daunting task.
All I could do is rely on lists posted by others.
That's how the current Quality Assurance system works.
[]
Post by Paul
How should a user respond to this kind of delivery system ?
Barge pole, 10 foot long.
Apply the updates, sure. But some time after they're released.
Paul
Obviously only a rule of thumb, but do you have a value for "some time"
- two weeks so they're about half way between updates? Or as near as
possible to the _following_ month's ones, in the hope that as many bugs
as possible have been fixed?

Or do you not have a fixed value for it, but instead monitor forums,
usenet, and (it seems to me) lots of other places (such as askwoody), to
see what others are saying and doing? I'd rather not have to do that (-:
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Just because you're old it doesn't mean you go beige. Quite the reverse.
- Laurence Llewelyn-Bowen, RT 2015/7/11-17
Paul
2018-03-25 16:23:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Paul
Post by mike
That does work. But deciding which ones to hide is a daunting task.
All I could do is rely on lists posted by others.
That's how the current Quality Assurance system works.
[]
Post by Paul
How should a user respond to this kind of delivery system ?
Barge pole, 10 foot long.
Apply the updates, sure. But some time after they're released.
Paul
Obviously only a rule of thumb, but do you have a value for "some time"
- two weeks so they're about half way between updates? Or as near as
possible to the _following_ month's ones, in the hope that as many bugs
as possible have been fixed?
Or do you not have a fixed value for it, but instead monitor forums,
usenet, and (it seems to me) lots of other places (such as askwoody), to
If you want, you have the option of backing up your C: drive,
blasting in all the updates, then testing.

If something is amiss, or the machine is bricked, restore
from backup.

When you're confident the update is good, you can "toss the backup image".

In other words, you can "do all the testing on your own dime".
And use the "statistics of one sample" to guide you.

If a second computer in the house needs updates, it's going
to need a backup too.

This is why it pays to keep your C: drive small, in the 45-60GB
range or so. And move your movie collection to your D: drive
for easier backup management.

To do the above on Windows 7, set Windows Update to manual,
so you can do the backup before "punching any buttons" in
Windows Update.

Paul
Maurice Helwig
2018-03-26 08:40:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul
That does work.  But deciding which ones to hide is a daunting task.
All I could do is rely on lists posted by others.
That's how the current Quality Assurance system works.
On Patch Tuesday, unsuspecting users (with Windows Update set to
full Auto) "test" the latest Cumulative Updates for us.
If a machine is bricked, or some strange behavior is
seen, it's reported in popular forums (or on USENET) so others
can benefit from the misfortune of the testers.
Then, Microsoft pulls the update, Microsoft visits the forum and
gets the list of problems, the developer works on it and re-releases
it. This avoids the need to dog-food the updates on Microsoft desktops,
or pay testers on the premises to do the testing.
The fact that Microsoft has the cheek to release Preview updates
for the month after, tells you how institutionalized this thinking is.
"We'll catch it in Field Test".
*******
How should a user respond to this kind of delivery system ?
Barge pole, 10 foot long.
Apply the updates, sure. But some time after they're released.
   Paul
A good summary Paul. I do not mind if someone becomes a Beta tester for
MS or some other company, but I do object to being used as an unwilling
guinea pig. I expect the problems to be sorted out before they get to me
(occasional obscure ones excepted -- after all no ones perfect)

As of today the computers I look after have not hag an update since
December, Updates are turned off, and Images made with Macrium Reflect.

It will stay that way until MS fixes their problem.
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Maurice Helwig
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Brian Gregory
2018-03-25 13:30:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Maurice Helwig
While others may have installed KB4088875 without any network problems,
I am not prepared to do so until it is fixed.
Have a look at --
https://www.askwoody.com/category/microsoft-windows-patches-security/
Classic example of a scaremonger.
--
Brian Gregory (in England).
David E. Ross
2018-03-25 15:33:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brian Gregory
Post by Maurice Helwig
While others may have installed KB4088875 without any network problems,
I am not prepared to do so until it is fixed.
Have a look at --
https://www.askwoody.com/category/microsoft-windows-patches-security/
Classic example of a scaremonger.
I am a volunteer with AARP, doing U.S. and state income tax returns for
free. All AARP volunteers across the country use laptops supplied by
the Internal Revenue Service (ITS) and a software service for income
taxes contracted by the IRS. In almost all cases, we file tax returns
electronically.

The AARP team with which I volunteer works only on Wednesdays. We
received a warning early last week, not to allow any further Windows
updates because other teams that work on Mondays and Tuesdays had their
laptops "bricked" by automatic Windows updates.

Not allowing updates, however, required our area coordinator to visit
our facility and use an administrative password to change the Windows
Update settings. Not even our site coordinator was allowed to have that
password.
--
David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/>

First you say you do, and then you don't.
And then you say you will, but then won't.
You're undecided now, so what're you goin' to do?
From a 1950s song
That should be Donald Trump's theme song. He obviously
does not understand "commitment", whether it is about
policy or marriage.
David E. Ross
2018-03-25 15:21:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Maurice Helwig
This morning (Sunday 2018-03-25) an optional update was presented for me
to install --
2018-03 Preview of Monthly Quality Rollup for Windows 7 for x64-based
Systems (KB4088881)
I do not install Preview updates ever but a look at the MS information
site on this KB shows that the IP address issue is acknowledged by MS
and is yet to be fixed.
http://support.microsoft.com/help/4088881
While others may have installed KB4088875 without any network problems,
I am not prepared to do so until it is fixed.
Have a look at --
https://www.askwoody.com/category/microsoft-windows-patches-security/
Can anyone tell me how to remove the "ALLOW REGKEY" which is required
for these updates to install.
Yes, I saw this yesterday. It seems to have many of the same
unacceptable "Known Issues" as KB4088875.
--
David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/>

First you say you do, and then you don't.
And then you say you will, but then won't.
You're undecided now, so what're you goin' to do?
From a 1950s song
That should be Donald Trump's theme song. He obviously
does not understand "commitment", whether it is about
policy or marriage.
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