Discussion:
System Volume Information ?
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c***@optonline.net
2018-06-17 21:55:41 UTC
Permalink
When defragging HD using Piriform's Defraggler, there is always a file
that's spread over a number of blocks and can't be consolidated.
Defraggler show a bit over 3500 blocks, each having a bit over 1/4 GB.
Path to the fragmented file is listed as "C:\System Volume
Information\", and the file accounts for over 5% of the HD.

Any "pearls of wisdom" relating to this, most welcome.
Paul
2018-06-17 22:10:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@optonline.net
When defragging HD using Piriform's Defraggler, there is always a file
that's spread over a number of blocks and can't be consolidated.
Defraggler show a bit over 3500 blocks, each having a bit over 1/4 GB.
Path to the fragmented file is listed as "C:\System Volume
Information\", and the file accounts for over 5% of the HD.
Any "pearls of wisdom" relating to this, most welcome.
Administrator command prompt

http://www.thewindowsclub.com/defrag-options-in-windows-7

http://www.thewindowsclub.com/disk-defragmenter-windows

# -w Perform FULL defragmentation of files of ALL sizes.

defrag C: -w

But note that the defrag command was a work in progress,
and my experience is, any useful option doesn't work.
(You may see a web article like the one above, where
the feature is now defunct.) Or, the option was removed.
And so on. The track record on it isn't that good.

The SVI folder is "Access Denied". Have you noticed ?
The defragmenter doesn't care, but then again, there's
a magic reason the defragmenter should not be in there.
There are shadow copies in there, which are not regular
files (you can break the files simply by reading them),
and it's not certain what the outcome would be
of defragmenting the representation in one of those.

Going to System control panel, System Protection (i.e.
System Restore control stuff), you have the option of
deleting restore points, or setting the restore point
max size to zero, which can erase most of the contents
in there. I don't know what happens if you do that
while your backup software is tracking Incrementals
with a persistent shadow. It's possible in Windows 10,
that if File History is enabled, it could be using
shadows for tracking file deltas (before transferring
the information to an external USB hard drive).

You have plenty of options, many places for Whack-A-Mole
action, but in the greater scheme of things, you should
just leave well enough alone. The commercial defragmenter
you're using, has put your user files in nice, neat order
for quick loading. Same as executable EXE or DLL files
in the system folder. And really, you should be
satisfied with that.

Defragment what it allows you to defragment... then
move on.

I usually keep SVI in "almost switched off" state,
so this isn't usually a problem. For example, I might
set the max size to 3GB, instead of whatever the
system set it to. On some OSes here, it's turned
off completely. A Macrium full backup might create
a VSS shadow, but the shadow in my case is not likely
to be persistent, so no harm done.

Paul
c***@optonline.net
2018-06-17 22:33:15 UTC
Permalink
Thanks Paul. So very much good info as usual.
Post by Paul
Going to System control panel, System Protection (i.e.
System Restore control stuff), you have the option of
deleting restore points, or setting the restore point
max size to zero, which can erase most of the contents
in there. I don't know what happens if you do that
while your backup software is tracking Incrementals
with a persistent shadow. It's possible in Windows 10,
that if File History is enabled, it could be using
shadows for tracking file deltas (before transferring
the information to an external USB hard drive).
You have plenty of options, many places for Whack-A-Mole
action, but in the greater scheme of things, you should
just leave well enough alone. The commercial defragmenter
you're using, has put your user files in nice, neat order
for quick loading. Same as executable EXE or DLL files
in the system folder. And really, you should be
satisfied with that.
Defragment what it allows you to defragment... then
move on.
Even when I delete all restore points, the file persists.

Just going to leave it and accept the apparent 5% fragmentation.

Thanks again ...

Steve
Paul
2018-06-18 00:19:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@optonline.net
Thanks Paul. So very much good info as usual.
Post by Paul
Going to System control panel, System Protection (i.e.
System Restore control stuff), you have the option of
deleting restore points, or setting the restore point
max size to zero, which can erase most of the contents
in there. I don't know what happens if you do that
while your backup software is tracking Incrementals
with a persistent shadow. It's possible in Windows 10,
that if File History is enabled, it could be using
shadows for tracking file deltas (before transferring
the information to an external USB hard drive).
You have plenty of options, many places for Whack-A-Mole
action, but in the greater scheme of things, you should
just leave well enough alone. The commercial defragmenter
you're using, has put your user files in nice, neat order
for quick loading. Same as executable EXE or DLL files
in the system folder. And really, you should be
satisfied with that.
Defragment what it allows you to defragment... then
move on.
Even when I delete all restore points, the file persists.
Just going to leave it and accept the apparent 5% fragmentation.
Thanks again ...
Steve
There are downloads here for jkdefrag.exe version 3.36.

https://web.archive.org/web/20150107024505/http://www.kessels.com/JkDefrag/

In an administrator command prompt window

cd /d C:\folder\where\jkdefrag_exe\is\located

jkdefrag -a 1 -d 2 C:

That command invocation just generates fragment information
without changing the file system. "-a 5" is "pack".
"-a 2" is defrag_without_packing.

Wait until the two pass block display completes. Close
the window. Note that the program is *not* finished yet.
It's generating "jkdefrag.log" file in the same folder
as "jkdefrag.exe". For a disk with a hundred thousand
fragmented files, it might take five minutes for the
jkdefrag.log file to finish filling up.

When the size of the jkdefrag.log file stops
increasing, jkdefrag.exe has exited. A second
invocation of jkdefrag.exe is then "cleared for
takeoff". A "frag-blocks" window won't pop up,
until the log file generation of the previous
session is finished.

Using "jkdefrag.log" and Notepad, you can examine
which files are listed. And, maybe your "mystery file"
will be listed in there.

I *hate* picking utilities for this stuff, because
really no utility is perfect, and if I name
a dozen things, the person reading the post will
merely be disappointed a dozen times :-/

Paul

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