Discussion:
Hiberfil.sys needed?
(too old to reply)
Dan
2018-07-07 10:25:57 UTC
Permalink
Hello.

I have 16GB RAM in my desktop. Do I need this file Hiberfil.sys?

I do not put my computer into standby.
Java Jive
2018-07-07 11:20:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan
Hello.
I have 16GB RAM in my desktop. Do I need this file Hiberfil.sys?
It depends ...
Post by Dan
I do not put my computer into standby.
Are you sure? If it's a desktop, I guess you will be pretty certain,
but if it's a laptop, do you ever close the lid, because, depending on
the power settings, that will likely put it into either standby or
hibernation.

Note that there is a difference between the two. AIUI ...

Standby is a reduced power mode, but the computer is still 'running' -
it's running state remains in RAM memory - and therefore drawing some
power. Hibernation is a form of shutdown where the running state of the
computer is saved to hard disk for quick retrieval, and therefore
requires nominally no power at all, though most modern PCs still draw
very small amounts of power even when turned off, to preserve CMOS
settings, and, in the case of a laptop, to keep the battery charged.

Hiberfile.sys is the file where the running state of the computer is
saved, and therefore is only required for hibernation, not standby.
Mr. Man-wai Chang
2018-07-07 12:26:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan
Hello.
I have 16GB RAM in my desktop. Do I need this file Hiberfil.sys?
I do not put my computer into standby.
I turn it off by "powercfg /h off" in an Admin Command Prompt and I have
only 8G RAM. No problem so far.

That file is mainly used for fast startup and hibernation.
--
@~@ Remain silent! Drink, Blink, Stretch! Live long and prosper!!
/ v \ Simplicity is Beauty!
/( _ )\ May the Force and farces be with you!
^ ^ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.39.3
不借貸! 不詐騙! 不賭錢! 不援交! 不打交! 不打劫! 不自殺! 不求神! 請考慮綜援
(CSSA):
http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
Dan
2018-07-07 12:34:57 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 7 Jul 2018 20:26:24 +0800, "Mr. Man-wai Chang"
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Dan
Hello.
I have 16GB RAM in my desktop. Do I need this file Hiberfil.sys?
I do not put my computer into standby.
I turn it off by "powercfg /h off" in an Admin Command Prompt and I have
only 8G RAM. No problem so far.
That file is mainly used for fast startup and hibernation.
Cheers, I have a laptop with 8 GB ram and SSD. I will do this as will.
Since SSD's have a limited write cycle.
Mr. Man-wai Chang
2018-07-07 16:45:04 UTC
Permalink
I turn it off by "powercfg /h off" ...
Someone corrected my mistake: it's "-h" not "/h". Sorry!
--
@~@ Remain silent! Drink, Blink, Stretch! Live long and prosper!!
/ v \ Simplicity is Beauty!
/( _ )\ May the Force and farces be with you!
^ ^ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.39.3
不借貸! 不詐騙! 不賭錢! 不援交! 不打交! 不打劫! 不自殺! 不求神! 請考慮綜援
(CSSA):
http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
Paul
2018-07-07 17:59:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
I turn it off by "powercfg /h off" ...
Someone corrected my mistake: it's "-h" not "/h". Sorry!
Syntax varies with OS version.

You can find both types of syntax in Google.

Paul
Stan Brown
2018-07-07 12:53:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan
I have 16GB RAM in my desktop. Do I need this file Hiberfil.sys?
I do not put my computer into standby.
Do you mean hibernation? If you never hibernate, then you can delete
it with the command
powercfg -h off
Source:
https://www.raymond.cc/blog/is-it-safe-to-delete-hiberfilsys-and-
pagefilesys/

I do hibernate, fifty times or more for every once I actually shut
down my laptop. The only problem I have with Hiberfil.sys is that it
increases the size of my backups, so I just tell my backup program to
ignore it, as it ignores Pagefile.sys.
--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://BrownMath.com/
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
Shikata ga nai...
Mayayana
2018-07-07 12:57:57 UTC
Permalink
"Dan" <***@nonedan.com> wrote

| I have 16GB RAM in my desktop. Do I need this file Hiberfil.sys?
|
| I do not put my computer into standby.
|

Java Jive explained the details and the difference
between hibernation and standby. Since you don't
seem to want/use hibernation, just check the Control
Panel power settings to make sure you don't have
it set for a hibernation option.

I use standby quite a bit with my desktop. I never
use hibernate. So I delete hiberfil.sys. When I use
a laptop I don't normally use it unplugged, so I
also don't need hibernation then. The only sensible
situation for hibernate would be a laptop that you
want to put on standby for a notable period of time
and can't plug in. In that case, hibernate won't
use power the way that standby would. But even
then the usefulness is questionable. Hibernate
shuts down the computer. So what's the point, really?
It just allows you to not bother saving your DOC
and closing MS Word before shutting down.


I also put a swap file on D:\ of set size. That keeps
it from growing. Then I set no swap on C. The normal
situation has pagefile.sys on C drive and it can be
quite large, even if you have a massive amount of RAM.
It's a standard that's outdated, going back to the time
when no one had a D drive and no one had enough RAM.
Frank Slootweg
2018-07-07 20:28:04 UTC
Permalink
Mayayana <***@invalid.nospam> wrote:
[...]
Post by Mayayana
I use standby quite a bit with my desktop. I never
use hibernate. So I delete hiberfil.sys. When I use
a laptop I don't normally use it unplugged, so I
also don't need hibernation then. The only sensible
situation for hibernate would be a laptop that you
want to put on standby for a notable period of time
and can't plug in. In that case, hibernate won't
use power the way that standby would. But even
then the usefulness is questionable. Hibernate
shuts down the computer. So what's the point, really?
It just allows you to not bother saving your DOC
and closing MS Word before shutting down.
Hibernate does not shut down the computer. That's the whole point. See
Java Jive's response as to what hibernate does and doesn't do. Hibernate
is faster than Shut Down and a resume from hibernate is much, much
faster than a power-on boot.

I just hibernated and resumed my 12GB 8.1 laptop (with a normal HDD,
no SSD) and it took about 25 seconds each way.

My laptop is mostly on mains power, so I mainly use Sleep (8.1 says
Sleep instead of Standby, at least mine does), but I use hibernate when
it's not on power, because it's much faster than Shut Down / reboot.

For a desktop, hibernate would mainly save energy consumption/costs.
Mayayana
2018-07-07 20:46:47 UTC
Permalink
"Frank Slootweg" <***@ddress.is.invalid> wrote

| Hibernate does not shut down the computer. That's the whole point. See
| Java Jive's response as to what hibernate does and doesn't do.

? He said the same I said: It stores the state of
the system in a file and shuts down, to avoid
using power to keep RAM charged, which standby
does.

But actually I've never used hibernate. Only standby.
Frank Slootweg
2018-07-07 21:24:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mayayana
| Hibernate does not shut down the computer. That's the whole point. See
| Java Jive's response as to what hibernate does and doesn't do.
? He said the same I said: It stores the state of
the system in a file and shuts down, to avoid
using power to keep RAM charged, which standby
does.
The term 'shut down' has a specific meaning in Windows. By doing a
shut down, everything that was running at shut down time, including the
OS, will have to be restarted at (re)boot. No such thing with hibernate.

Hibernate does its thing and then only does a *power-off* at the end.
Post by Mayayana
But actually I've never used hibernate. Only standby.
You mean 'sleep'! :-) Just kidding, 'standby' is fine by me [1].

[1] For example in (HP/8.1) Power Options, Hibernate is a subcategory of
Sleep! Who needs terminology if we can have total chaos instead! :-)
Paul
2018-07-07 22:20:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Slootweg
Post by Mayayana
| Hibernate does not shut down the computer. That's the whole point. See
| Java Jive's response as to what hibernate does and doesn't do.
? He said the same I said: It stores the state of
the system in a file and shuts down, to avoid
using power to keep RAM charged, which standby
does.
The term 'shut down' has a specific meaning in Windows. By doing a
shut down, everything that was running at shut down time, including the
OS, will have to be restarted at (re)boot. No such thing with hibernate.
Hibernate does its thing and then only does a *power-off* at the end.
Post by Mayayana
But actually I've never used hibernate. Only standby.
You mean 'sleep'! :-) Just kidding, 'standby' is fine by me [1].
[1] For example in (HP/8.1) Power Options, Hibernate is a subcategory of
Sleep! Who needs terminology if we can have total chaos instead! :-)
Sleep Stays in RAM, uses a watt or two to keep RAM contents refreshed.
(My 8x8GB RAM machine needs 7.5W, my 4x2GB machine needs 5W, YMMV)

Hybrid sleep Same as sleep, only the session information is also
kept in the hiberfile.
Uses a watt or two to keep RAM contents refreshed.
Starts quickly (if the RAM contents are still around).
On power loss, reverts to hiberfile, slow startup.

Hibernate Session kept in hiberfile.
RAM is not powered.
Both stop and start are slow (function of %RAM used).
Only "active" RAM areas are recorded. An idle desktop
might need 350MB of writes to the hiberfile.

Fast Start Kernel hibernation, followed by driver warm start on recovery.
Uses hiberfile.
Doesn't require power for RAM.
Session and applications not recorded.
Likely a Win8/Win10 feature - I don't think Win7 has it.

Use "powercfg /h off" to defeat the hiberfile and
easily achieve full shutdowns without resorting
to tricks.

Standby (S1) traditionally just removed sync signals from
the VGA monitor cable, causing the monitor screen to blank.
Much of the remaining hardware was left running. The fans
are still spinning in Standby. With modern C states, and
ACPI, similar savings can be achieved while still running
in S0. Use Sleep (S3) if you expect to be away from the
machine for a bit.

Paul
Frank Slootweg
2018-07-08 10:52:02 UTC
Permalink
Paul <***@needed.invalid> wrote:
[...]
Post by Paul
Hibernate Session kept in hiberfile.
RAM is not powered.
And most importantly - especially for a laptop - the *system* does not
need to be powered.
Post by Paul
Both stop and start are slow (function of %RAM used).
This needs qualification as to 'slow' compared to *what*?

[...]

VanguardLH
2018-07-07 19:13:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan
I have 16GB RAM in my desktop. Do I need this file Hiberfil.sys?
I do not put my computer into standby.
Only used (created on shutdown) if you enabled Hibernate mode in
Windows. Do you ever hibernate the OS?

Hibernate is NOT a standby (low-power power-ON) mode. Hibernate is a
power-OFF mode: memory gets copied into a file and the computer is
powered down. On power up and OS boot, the file (hiberfil.sys) gets
read back into memory to restart where you left off before. Takes time
to write all of memory into a file, so shutdown takes longer, and also
takes time to read the file into memory on Windows startup (although the
assumption is that takes much less time then loading everything from
scratch).
Paul in Houston TX
2018-07-07 20:26:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan
Hello.
I have 16GB RAM in my desktop. Do I need this file Hiberfil.sys?
I do not put my computer into standby.
It is not normally needed on a desktop.
At a command prompt, type:
POWERCFG -H OFF
The sys will be auto deleted.

I also turned it off on the laptops due to shutdown taking significantly
longer and startup somewhat longer than a normal cold boot.
And Outlook needs to be shut down and restarted to reconnect to the VPN.
It's faster for me to just cold boot and restart the programs.
Loading...