Discussion:
Thinking of updating my MS Office?
(too old to reply)
Yousuf Khan
2018-04-04 17:09:44 UTC
Permalink
Currently using Office 2007 (Ultimate), mainly use Word, Excel, and
Access at home. I understand Office 2019 is about to come out, so I'm
thinking there might be some good deals on Office 2016 soon. Thinking of
going to Office 2016, not interested in the Office 365 subscription
model at all. Also let's not get sidetracked by discussions about
OpenOffice or Google Docs, I use those as well, but you need the actual
MS Office for the most features and most compatibility.

Is there anything new that is useful with 2016 that's not also in 2007?
I'm talking about new side applications and/or features within the main
applications, for example.

Also I understand that Office 2019 will only work in Windows 10, so does
Office 2016 work in Windows 7 too?

Yousuf Khan
Char Jackson
2018-04-04 19:04:09 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 4 Apr 2018 13:09:44 -0400, Yousuf Khan
Post by Yousuf Khan
Is there anything new that is useful with 2016 that's not also in 2007?
I'm talking about new side applications and/or features within the main
applications, for example.
Most of my colleagues love the OneNote application. Is that available in
Office 2007? I can't give a personal review because it's been on my
"need to try this" list for a couple of years now. I'm just too lazy to
make my life better, I guess.
Post by Yousuf Khan
Also I understand that Office 2019 will only work in Windows 10, so does
Office 2016 work in Windows 7 too?
Yes. I use Office 2016 with Windows 7, 8.1, and 10.
--
Char Jackson
VanguardLH
2018-04-04 21:12:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Char Jackson
Post by Yousuf Khan
Is there anything new that is useful with 2016 that's not also in
2007? I'm talking about new side applications and/or features within
the main applications, for example.
Get ready for the ribbon bar. Everything you learned about where were
functions in the menus is discarded in having to figure out where it
moved to in the ribbon bar.
Post by Char Jackson
Most of my colleagues love the OneNote application.
You don't have to buy OneNote. It is free and available for Windows,
Android, and iOS (Apple).

https://www.onenote.com/
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.microsoft.office.onenote
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/microsoft-onenote/id410395246?mt=8
Post by Char Jackson
Post by Yousuf Khan
Also I understand that Office 2019 will only work in Windows 10, so
does Office 2016 work in Windows 7 too?
Yes. I use Office 2016 with Windows 7, 8.1, and 10.
Deals don't show up on Microsoft products until about 3 years after a
new version has been *released*. Also, the last version often remains
high for quite awhile. You need to go back 2, or more, versions several
years after the release of a new version to find good deals on old
versions. Most vendors sell only the license key. You have to download
the product (often from Microsoft).

Make sure you get the correct edition. If you're using Outlook, you
don't want to get the Home & Student edition that is missing Outlook.
If you use any of Outlook, Publisher, or Access, you don't want the Home
& Student or Home & Business editions. OneNote is in all editions but
then it is available for free no matter what MSOffice edition you get.
Steve Hayes
2018-04-05 05:14:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by VanguardLH
Post by Yousuf Khan
Is there anything new that is useful with 2016 that's not also in
2007? I'm talking about new side applications and/or features within
the main applications, for example.
Get ready for the ribbon bar. Everything you learned about where were
functions in the menus is discarded in having to figure out where it
moved to in the ribbon bar.
Office 2007 was the one that introduced the ribbon bar.
--
Steve Hayes
http://www.khanya.org.za/stevesig.htm
http://khanya.wordpress.com
(PeteCresswell)
2018-04-05 12:33:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve Hayes
Office 2007 was the one that introduced the ribbon bar.
When I was developing ad-hoc Access apps for bond traders (who were using
Office 2003 at the time), people would tell me "If the new app involves my
having to use Office 2007, just forget it...".

I think the Ribbon Bar was the primary culprit.
--
Pete Cresswell
Good Guy
2018-04-05 21:18:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by (PeteCresswell)
I think the Ribbon Bar was the primary culprit.
And you were so stupid that you didn't even think of telling them that
Ribbon is very intuitive if the users have some common sense. Idiots
should stop using all Microsoft products but people with some
intelligence would waste their abilities if they start using those junk
products that are given away free of charge. Microsoft is for the
intelligent person; Linux Junk and associated free products are for the
idiots.
Post by (PeteCresswell)
/--- This email has been checked for viruses by
Windows Defender software.
//https://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/windows/comprehensive-security/
--
With over 600 million devices now running Windows 10, customer
satisfaction is higher than any previous version of windows.
(PeteCresswell)
2018-04-06 13:12:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Good Guy
And you were so stupid that you didn't even think of telling them that
Ribbon is very intuitive if the users have some common sense. Idiots
should stop using all Microsoft products...
These are fund managers at a major mutual fund.

They have higher IQs and make more money than you or I ever dreamed of.

Try telling them what you just wrote above, and good luck with the rest of
your (extremely brief) career at that company.

In a prior life I worked at mainframe programming at a big-city utility
company and we had system programmers that thought everybody in the company
who did not know all about the IBM OS and JCL was an idiot - but most of
those "Idiots" were engineers earning substantially more than the system
programmers.
--
Pete Cresswell
Big Al
2018-04-06 13:20:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by (PeteCresswell)
I think the Ribbon Bar was the primary culprit.
I didn't like it myself either but got used to it. It's everywhere
now. With all the features they are jambing into programs now, it's
about as bad as all the toolbars they used to have. Kinda 50/50.
Yousuf Khan
2018-04-05 01:45:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Char Jackson
On Wed, 4 Apr 2018 13:09:44 -0400, Yousuf Khan
Post by Yousuf Khan
Is there anything new that is useful with 2016 that's not also in 2007?
I'm talking about new side applications and/or features within the main
applications, for example.
Most of my colleagues love the OneNote application. Is that available in
Office 2007? I can't give a personal review because it's been on my
"need to try this" list for a couple of years now. I'm just too lazy to
make my life better, I guess.
Yes, OneNote is in 2007.
Post by Char Jackson
Post by Yousuf Khan
Also I understand that Office 2019 will only work in Windows 10, so does
Office 2016 work in Windows 7 too?
Yes. I use Office 2016 with Windows 7, 8.1, and 10.
Great, I have one Windows 7 notebook that I'm not going to try to bother
to upgrade to Windows 10, I already tried it on it, and a lot of
features stopped working under it, so I restored it back to Windows 7
and have run it ever since.

Yousuf Khan
philo
2018-04-04 22:41:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Yousuf Khan
Currently using Office 2007 (Ultimate), mainly use Word, Excel, and
Access at home. I understand Office 2019 is about to come out, so I'm
thinking there might be some good deals on Office 2016 soon. Thinking of
going to Office 2016, not interested in the Office 365 subscription
model at all. Also let's not get sidetracked by discussions about
OpenOffice or Google Docs, I use those as well, but you need the actual
MS Office for the most features and most compatibility.
Is there anything new that is useful with 2016 that's not also in 2007?
I'm talking about new side applications and/or features within the main
applications, for example.
Also I understand that Office 2019 will only work in Windows 10, so does
Office 2016 work in Windows 7 too?
    Yousuf Khan
Unless the new version has some features you really need...no sense in
updating.

Most of the people I know are fine with their ten year old versions.
George
2018-04-04 23:44:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by philo
Post by Yousuf Khan
Currently using Office 2007 (Ultimate), mainly use Word, Excel, and
Access at home. I understand Office 2019 is about to come out, so I'm
thinking there might be some good deals on Office 2016 soon. Thinking of
going to Office 2016, not interested in the Office 365 subscription
model at all. Also let's not get sidetracked by discussions about
OpenOffice or Google Docs, I use those as well, but you need the actual
MS Office for the most features and most compatibility.
Is there anything new that is useful with 2016 that's not also in 2007?
I'm talking about new side applications and/or features within the main
applications, for example.
Also I understand that Office 2019 will only work in Windows 10, so does
Office 2016 work in Windows 7 too?
    Yousuf Khan
Unless the new version has some features you really need...no sense in
updating.
One caveat: MS Office 2007 has already gone End-of-life.
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/lifecycle/search/8753

Here's the same information for Office 2016.
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/lifecycle/search/18412

To the OP: If you aren't already using it, and you need to keep
your Office 2007 installation patched, you might look into
extended support (esr) version (currently, 9.2.4) of WSUS
Offline.
http://www.wsusoffline.net/
The standard version (currently 11.2.1) is extremely useful for
currently-supported MS software.
--
George Ruch
"Is there life in Clovis after Clovis Man?"
slate_leeper
2018-04-05 14:09:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by George
One caveat: MS Office 2007 has already gone End-of-life.
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/lifecycle/search/8753
Here's the same information for Office 2016.
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/lifecycle/search/18412
I recently installed XP as a virtual system on my Win-10 computer. On
XP I installed Office XP.

Interestingly, even though the XP "drive" was not active at the time,
when I used the Win Mini-Update tool, it came up with "Office XP SP3"
update.

I declined. My OfficeXP has been doing everything I want for years.

-dan z-
--
Someone who thinks logically provides
a nice contrast to the real world.
(Anonymous)
Yousuf Khan
2018-04-05 01:47:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by philo
Unless the new version has some features you really need...no sense in
updating.
Most of the people I know are fine with their ten year old versions.
That's what I'm trying to determine. I'm starting to get a bit more
advanced in Access right now, and reading some stuff online, it seems
there's a few extra features in later versions of Access than the one in
2007.

Yousuf Khan
s|b
2018-04-05 18:09:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by philo
Unless the new version has some features you really need...no sense in
updating.
Most of the people I know are fine with their ten year old versions.
I've convinced family and friends to use OOo and later LO (LibreOffice).
So far, no complaints...
--
s|b
Stan Brown
2018-04-05 02:21:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Yousuf Khan
Is there anything new that is useful with 2016 that's not also in 2007?
Office 2007 was slow and very buggy. Both conditions were
significantly improved by Service Pack 3. Still, 2016 is a bit
peppier.

I googled "differences Office 2007 and Office 2016" (without quotes,
and got quite a few useful-looking hits, a few of which were actually
relevant. Here are a couple:

https://www.reddit.com/r/microsoft/comments/429ti5/is_it_worth_it_to_
upgrade_from_office_2007_to/

https://forums.windowssecrets.com/showthread.php/177144-Office-365-
vs-Office-2007-work-process-differences-if-any

I personally loathe one aspect of the Excel 2016 interface: every
opened workbook is a separate window, and so to close the program you
have to click the red X multiple times. But then I bought Office 2010
when it was current, and I don't know of any new features in 2013 or
2016 that I really need.
Post by Yousuf Khan
Also I understand that Office 2019 will only work in Windows 10, so
does Office 2016 work in Windows 7 too?
Yes, it does. We have it on virtual machines at work.
--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://BrownMath.com/
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
Shikata ga nai...
Char Jackson
2018-04-05 06:56:13 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 4 Apr 2018 22:21:24 -0400, Stan Brown
Post by Stan Brown
I personally loathe one aspect of the Excel 2016 interface: every
opened workbook is a separate window, [snip]
One of my favorite and most-used features. I frequently have two or more
workbooks open at once and it's very useful to be able to move them
around to any of my 3 displays.
--
Char Jackson
(PeteCresswell)
2018-04-05 12:37:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Char Jackson
One of my favorite and most-used features. I frequently have two or more
workbooks open at once and it's very useful to be able to move them
around to any of my 3 displays.
+1 - putting all the workbooks under a single window makes me crazy.

IIRC, in 2003 at least, there is a registry change one can make that cures
that problem and opens each workbook in it's own window.

Personally, I have been drifting towards LibreOffice 4.2 because it opens the
occasional .XLSX file I get.

Even so, I keep Office 2003 installed just for MS Access...
--
Pete Cresswell
Mayayana
2018-04-05 14:43:06 UTC
Permalink
"(PeteCresswell)" <***@y.Invalid> wrote

| Personally, I have been drifting towards LibreOffice 4.2 because it opens
the
| occasional .XLSX file I get.

Is there a reason not to use the latest --
5.4 for XP or 6 for Win7+? I use LO for everything
office-esque, but my needs are minimal, so I
haven't really looked into differences between
versions. I just update every once in awhile,
when I think of it.
(PeteCresswell)
2018-04-05 21:09:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mayayana
Is there a reason not to use the latest --
5.4 for XP or 6 for Win7+? I use LO for everything
office-esque, but my needs are minimal, so I
haven't really looked into differences between
versions. I just update every once in awhile,
when I think of it.
That's the diff - I have yet to think about it ...-)

But now that you have said it, I guess I should DL the latest-and-greatest...
--
Pete Cresswell
Java Jive
2018-04-05 14:48:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by (PeteCresswell)
Post by Char Jackson
One of my favorite and most-used features. I frequently have two or more
workbooks open at once and it's very useful to be able to move them
around to any of my 3 displays.
+1 - putting all the workbooks under a single window makes me crazy.
Whereas splurging the desktop with multiple windows and the task bar
with multiple icons for the same app makes me crazy. I try to keep all
my main work windows exactly above each other and then use <Alt Tab> to
switch rapidly between them, and the first thing I have to do whenever I
open a second window of anything is put it back exactly above the
other(s) because of MS' unhelpful insistance on putting somewhere else,
anywhere else, than where I actually want it.
Post by (PeteCresswell)
IIRC, in 2003 at least, there is a registry change one can make that cures
that problem and opens each workbook in it's own window.
In earlier editions of Office such as 2000, it was an explicit choice in
the options dialog. Now I don't get the choice any more, because, after
all in these days of multiple monitors all guzzling electricity, who
ever heard of anyone working so efficiently that they only need just one?!

Er, should I have put a smiley there, I wonder? Alright, here it is :-)
Post by (PeteCresswell)
Personally, I have been drifting towards LibreOffice 4.2 because it opens the
occasional .XLSX file I get.
I use Libre Office for most things now, but that too is multiple
windows, sigh!
(PeteCresswell)
2018-04-05 21:12:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Java Jive
Whereas splurging the desktop with multiple windows and the task bar
with multiple icons for the same app makes me crazy.
Maybe it has something to do with multiple monitors?

Do you have more than one?

I have two beeeeeg monitors and one smaller one - so it's a plus to be able
to glance from sheet-to-sheet.... also, I have limited grey matter, so
remembering what is on Sheet A while looking at Sheet B is sometimes beyond
me....
--
Pete Cresswell
Yousuf Khan
2018-04-19 22:03:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Java Jive
Whereas splurging the desktop with multiple windows and the task bar
with multiple icons for the same app makes me crazy. I try to keep all
my main work windows exactly above each other and then use <Alt Tab> to
switch rapidly between them, and the first thing I have to do whenever I
open a second window of anything is put it back exactly above the
other(s) because of MS' unhelpful insistance on putting somewhere else,
anywhere else, than where I actually want it.
I find that if the two worksheets are part of the same window, rather
than being separate windows, you have a much tougher time switching back
and forth between them, especially when you're copying & pasting info
between the two worksheets.

Yousuf Khan

J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-04-05 19:43:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by (PeteCresswell)
Post by Char Jackson
One of my favorite and most-used features. I frequently have two or more
workbooks open at once and it's very useful to be able to move them
around to any of my 3 displays.
+1 - putting all the workbooks under a single window makes me crazy.
IIRC, in 2003 at least, there is a registry change one can make that cures
that problem and opens each workbook in it's own window.
Personally, I have been drifting towards LibreOffice 4.2 because it opens the
occasional .XLSX file I get.
Didn't Microsoft release a patch to open the .---x variants in earlier
Offices; I know they did for .docx.
Post by (PeteCresswell)
Even so, I keep Office 2003 installed just for MS Access...
I prefer Excel 2003 because of the non-ribbon: I'm not _too_ bothered
about the ribbon itself, but it uses up vertical space on my monitor,
meaning I can't see as much of one particular spreadsheet (or have to
zoom out enough that it's very hard to read). [My main machine is this
laptop, which doesn't have multiple monitors.]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

A man is not contemptible because he thinks science explains everything, and a
man is not contemptible because he doesn't. - Howard Jacobson, in Radio Times
2010/1/23-29.
Char Jackson
2018-04-05 20:30:30 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 5 Apr 2018 20:43:07 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I prefer Excel 2003 because of the non-ribbon: I'm not _too_ bothered
about the ribbon itself, but it uses up vertical space on my monitor,
meaning I can't see as much of one particular spreadsheet (or have to
zoom out enough that it's very hard to read). [My main machine is this
laptop, which doesn't have multiple monitors.]
Couldn't you collapse the ribbon unless/until you actually need it?
It has 3 display settings:
Auto-Hide
Show tabs
Show Tabs and Commands

Perhaps Auto-Hide would fit your use case best.
--
Char Jackson
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-04-05 20:54:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Char Jackson
On Thu, 5 Apr 2018 20:43:07 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I prefer Excel 2003 because of the non-ribbon: I'm not _too_ bothered
about the ribbon itself, but it uses up vertical space on my monitor,
meaning I can't see as much of one particular spreadsheet (or have to
zoom out enough that it's very hard to read). [My main machine is this
laptop, which doesn't have multiple monitors.]
Couldn't you collapse the ribbon unless/until you actually need it?
Auto-Hide
Show tabs
Show Tabs and Commands
Perhaps Auto-Hide would fit your use case best.
Probably. Either I didn't know the above, or had forgotten it. But I've
reloaded 2003 now. There seem now to be two shortcuts in my Office
program folder, for each - Word 2007, Word 2003, Excel 2007, Excel 2003,
and so on.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Capital flows toward lower costs like a river to lowest ground.
"MJ", 2015-12-05
(PeteCresswell)
2018-04-05 21:15:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Char Jackson
Couldn't you collapse the ribbon unless/until you actually need it?
Auto-Hide
Show tabs
Show Tabs and Commands
I think the issue with my bond traders was more that MS had (as usual) moved
the furniture around and they did not feel like they had the time to deal
with it when they could play Excel 2003 like Yitzhak Pearlman plays the
violin.
--
Pete Cresswell
Stan Brown
2018-04-05 21:48:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I prefer Excel 2003 because of the non-ribbon: I'm not _too_ bothered
about the ribbon itself, but it uses up vertical space on my
monitor,
That's why Excel offers the option to minimize the ribbon. I don't
know about 2007, but the feature is there in 2010, 2013, and 2016.
Simply right-click in the ribbon and select Minimize. It comes back,
briefly, when you click on any tab.

The ribbon takes some getting used to, I won't deny. But these
helped:

http://www.rondebruin.nl/win/s5/win008.htm

http://vpsaweb2.sjsu.edu/ES/ES/systems/Excel2007.xlsx
(Despite the ES, it's in English.)
--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://BrownMath.com/
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
Shikata ga nai...
Stan Brown
2018-04-05 21:35:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Char Jackson
On Wed, 4 Apr 2018 22:21:24 -0400, Stan Brown
Post by Stan Brown
I personally loathe one aspect of the Excel 2016 interface: every
opened workbook is a separate window, [snip]
One of my favorite and most-used features. I frequently have two or more
workbooks open at once and it's very useful to be able to move them
around to any of my 3 displays.
Office 2013 did not add that feature, which was always there in
Windows (at least from Windows 7; I'm not sure about Vista). Shift-
clicking on the taskbar box for any program opens a second copy of
it, which you can move anywhere you like.

Office 2013 took away the feature of having multiple workbooks open
in one window.
--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://BrownMath.com/
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
Shikata ga nai...
Fokke Nauta
2018-04-09 11:11:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Yousuf Khan
Currently using Office 2007 (Ultimate), mainly use Word, Excel, and
Access at home. I understand Office 2019 is about to come out, so I'm
thinking there might be some good deals on Office 2016 soon. Thinking of
going to Office 2016, not interested in the Office 365 subscription
model at all. Also let's not get sidetracked by discussions about
OpenOffice or Google Docs, I use those as well, but you need the actual
MS Office for the most features and most compatibility.
Is there anything new that is useful with 2016 that's not also in 2007?
I'm talking about new side applications and/or features within the main
applications, for example.
Also I understand that Office 2019 will only work in Windows 10, so does
Office 2016 work in Windows 7 too?
Yousuf Khan
Yes, Office 2016 works well on W7 (pro 64b). I had to get used to the
differences with 2007 (less) and 2003 (huge). But now me and my wife use
2016 on all systems. Not cheap but it works well.
BTW, I would'n want 365 either.

Fokke
Keith Keith
2018-04-09 15:44:16 UTC
Permalink
Hello Fokke,

I use WPS Office, from KingSoft, no Access but word processing and spreadsheets
can be made to work like MS Office Pro. Never used its Presentation (PowerPoint)
as I don't do slides/presentations... retired from work 20 years ago.
Post by Fokke Nauta
Post by Yousuf Khan
Currently using Office 2007 (Ultimate), mainly use Word, Excel, and
Access at home. I understand Office 2019 is about to come out, so I'm
thinking there might be some good deals on Office 2016 soon. Thinking
of going to Office 2016, not interested in the Office 365
subscription model at all. Also let's not get sidetracked by
discussions about OpenOffice or Google Docs, I use those as well, but
you need the actual MS Office for the most features and most
compatibility.
Is there anything new that is useful with 2016 that's not also in
2007? I'm talking about new side applications and/or features within
the main applications, for example.
Also I understand that Office 2019 will only work in Windows 10, so
does Office 2016 work in Windows 7 too?
Yousuf Khan
Yes, Office 2016 works well on W7 (pro 64b). I had to get used to the
differences with 2007 (less) and 2003 (huge). But now me and my wife use
2016 on all systems. Not cheap but it works well.
BTW, I would'n want 365 either.
Fokke
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