Discussion:
Quick customized-installation tutorial for setting up gVim on Windows
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Arlen Holder
2018-06-28 06:22:13 UTC
Permalink
****************************************************************************
Quick customized-installation tutorial for setting up gVim on Windows
Tested only on Windows 10, but it should work on all versions of Windows.
Please suggest improvements if you have helpful ideas to benefit others.
****************************************************************************
============================================================================
1. Download the gvim80-586.exe installer from the canonical site:
http://www.vim.org/download.php/
============================================================================
2. Doubleclick on gvim80-586.exe and select the type of install
The default list of checked settings is:
[x]Vim executables and runtime files
[x]Vim console program (vim.exe)
[ ]Create .bat files for command line use
[x]Create icons on the desktop
[x]Add vim to the start menu
[x]Add an edit-with-vim context menu entry
[x]Create a _vimrc if it doesn't exist
[x]Create plugin directories in HOME or VIM
[ ]Create plugin directriesa in VIM
[ ]VisVim extension for MS Visual Studio
[x]Native Language Support

If desired, change those default checked settings to:
[x]Vim executables and runtime files
[x]Vim console program (vim.exe)
[x]Create .bat files for command line use
[x]Create icons on the desktop
[x]Add vim to the start menu
[x]Add an edit-with-vim context menu entry
[x]Create a _vimrc if it doesn't exist
[x]Create plugin directories in HOME or VIM
[ ]Create plugin directriesa in VIM
[ ]VisVim extension for MS Visual Studio
[ ]Native Language Support

Explanation of changes:
- Creating batch files allows vim to be run easily in a command window.
- Native language support isn't all that useful for English speakers.
============================================================================
3. The program will default to installing in C:\Program Files (x86)\Vim
I installed it into C:\app\editor\txt\vim instead.

Note: The default may depend on your operating system.
Note: Use whatever directory structure makes sense to you.

Note that the installer is in the category of misbehaving (IMHO) in that
it creates *multiple* levels of hierarchy, e.g., if you install into:
C:\app\editor\txt\vim
What you end up with is:
C:\app\editor\txt\vim\vim80\
and
C:\app\editor\txt\vim\vimfiles\
and
C:\app\editor\txt\vim\_vimrc
============================================================================
4. By default, 3 desktop shortcuts are created:
a. gVim 8.0
Default Target = "C:\Program Files (x86)\Vim\vim80\gvim.exe"
Default Startin = %HOMEDRIVE%%HOMEPATH%
b. gVim Easy 8.0
Default Target = "C:\Program Files (x86)\Vim\vim80\gvim.exe" -y
Default Startin = %HOMEDRIVE%%HOMEPATH%
c. gVim Read only 8.0
Default "C:\Program Files (x86)\Vim\vim80\gvim.exe" -R
Default Startin = %HOMEDRIVE%%HOMEPATH%

I delete the latter two & put the remaining shortcut in the menus:
A. Right click on the desktop "gVim 8.0" > SendTo > Heterodox Start Menu
B. Right click on the desktop "gVim 8.0" > SendTo > Cascade Start Menu
C. As desired, organize "gVIM 8.0" for your Orthodox Start Menu

Note: The default may depend on your operating system.
Note: See separate notes for setting up menus using the SendTo feature.
============================================================================
5. Test the command-line feature to test the batch-file option:

Run a quick test in a command window:
Start > cmd > [Enter] > vim foo

Note that setting the batch file option will create the following files:
%windir%\{evim,gview,gvim,gvimdiff,view,vim,vimdiff,vimtutor}.bat
============================================================================
6. Make gVim the default for editing *.txt text files.

a. Create a sample text file, e.g., C:\tmp\fname.txt
b. RMB on fname.txt > Open with > Choose another app >
Other options > More apps > (scroll down to select)
"VI Improved - a Text Editor"
[x]Always use this app to open .txt files

Notice the "Settings" method does not work because there is no
option for setting vim as the default editor for text files.
A. Start > Settings > Apps > Default apps >
Choose default apps by file type
Change from ".txt ==> Notepad"
Your only choices are:
a. Notepad
b. Registry Editor Utility
c. Wordpad
d. Look for an app in the store
Note: RMB=== right mouse button

Note: The sequence may depend on your operating system.
============================================================================
7. If desired, fix the unsightly ungainly turd files proliferation problem.

Start > cmd > [Enter]
copy c:\app\editor\txt\vim\_vimrc c:\app\editor\txt\vim\_vimrc.orig
mkdir c:\tmp\turd\vim\directory
mkdir c:\tmp\turd\vim\backup
mkdir c:\tmp\turd\vim\undo
vim c:\app\editor\txt\vim\_vimrc

Add the following lines to the beginning of _vimrc:
set directory=c:\\tmp\turd\vim\directory//,%TMP%,C:\WINDOWS\Temp//,$HOME,.
set backupdir=c:\\tmp\turd\vim\backup//,%TMP%,C:\WINDOWS\Temp//,$HOME,.
set undodir=c:\\tmp\turd\vim\undo//,%TMP%,C:\WINDOWS\Temp//,$HOME,.
============================================================================
9. Test turd file dynamics (by creating, editing & changing files).

a. Open the three locations in separate Windows file explorer windows:
c:\tmp\turd\vim\directory
c:\tmp\turd\vim\backup
c:\tmp\turd\vim\undo
b. Create, edit, and change a test file to note how turd files react:
RMB > New > Text Document >
c:\app\editor\txt\vim\New Text Document.txt
c. Doubleclick "New Text Document.txt" & observe turd file changes.

directory
Ephemeral %-swp-named swap lock file created when you edit a text file.
fname=C%%app%editor%txt%vim%New Text Document.txt.swp

backup
Persistent ~-named file when you save a text file.
fname=New Text Document.txt~

undo
Persistent %-named txt file when you save changes to a text file.
fname=C%%app%editor%txt%vim%New Text Document.txt
============================================================================
10. If desired, set gVim to edit extensionless files when doubleclicked.

Create this registry file & import into the registry;

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.]
[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.\shell]
[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.\shell\open]
[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.\shell\open\command]
@="\"C:\\app\\editor\\txt\\vim\\vim80\\gvim.exe\" \"%1\""

Note: If desired, set Notepad to edit extensionless files instead:

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.]
[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.\shell]
[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.\shell\open]
[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.\shell\open\command]
@="\"C:\\Windows\\System32\\NOTEPAD.EXE\" \"%1\""
============================================================================
11. If desired, edit or remove the RMB context menu added by the installer.

If you have CCleaner installed, then run
CCleaner: Tools > Startup > Context Menu >
- Enabled = Change Yes to No (if desired)
- Key = File
- Program = gvim
- Publisher = Tianmiao Hu's Developer Studio
- File = C:\app\editor\txt\vim\vim80\gvimext.dll


Note: I checked the Windows task scheduler where no tasks were added.
a. Open an admin command window or powershell using normal procedures.
b. Then start the task scheduler using either this method:
%windir%\system32\control.exe
System and Security > Administrative Tools > TASk Scheduler
Or use this method to open the task scheduler as admin:
%windir%\system32\taskschd.msc /s
c. Select the "Task Scheduler Library" entry (top left)
d. Check for any tasks set up by the installer
(There were none when I checked today.)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
12. If desired, check the setup in the default _vimrc file:

Start > Run > cmd > [Enter]
vim c:\app\editor\txt\vim\_vimrc

Make sure _vimrc sources mswin.vim which maps the ^v to the paste.
(Otherwise you need to use control+q on Windows instead of control+v.)

For example, normally you'd use control+v in this circumstance:
:%s/xxx/&<control-v><return>/g
But if the mapping of control+v isn't set, then you have to use this:
:%s/abc/&<control-q><return>/g

NOTE: the syntax is, roughly:
: === begin command
% === for the whole file
s === search
/ === for
abc ==== the characters abc
/ === then
/&<control-v><return> === replace it plus add a carriage return
/ === do that
g === for as many times as you see abc in any given line
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Please test and suggest improvements so that everyone benefits.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
--
Tested today only on WIndows 10 but I've been installing gVIM on all
versions of Windows over the decades so it should work, with minor changes,
on all Windows platforms.
Char Jackson
2018-06-28 13:33:35 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 28 Jun 2018 06:22:13 -0000 (UTC), Arlen Holder
Post by Arlen Holder
****************************************************************************
Quick customized-installation tutorial for setting up gVim on Windows
Tested only on Windows 10, but it should work on all versions of Windows.
Please suggest improvements if you have helpful ideas to benefit others.
****************************************************************************
As you may know, there are many editors available. Most won't require a
tutorial to install or use.

I use and recommend Notepad++ from https://notepad-plus-plus.org/.
Big Al
2018-06-28 14:07:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Char Jackson
On Thu, 28 Jun 2018 06:22:13 -0000 (UTC), Arlen Holder
Post by Arlen Holder
****************************************************************************
Quick customized-installation tutorial for setting up gVim on Windows
Tested only on Windows 10, but it should work on all versions of Windows.
Please suggest improvements if you have helpful ideas to benefit others.
****************************************************************************
As you may know, there are many editors available. Most won't require a
tutorial to install or use.
I use and recommend Notepad++ from https://notepad-plus-plus.org/.
+1
Personally I'm getting tired of Arlen's tutorials. I may be a
minority but I've said my piece and I'll shut up now.
Arlen Holder
2018-06-28 14:19:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Big Al
Personally I'm getting tired of Arlen's tutorials. I may be a
minority but I've said my piece and I'll shut up now.
*Can Big Al contribute any technical merit to this Usenet newsgroup?*

I'll wager that there are technical nuances in the original tutorial that
you are completely ignorant of, Big Al, are there not?

Do you know, for example, of how to wrestle the "turd files" into
submission, in vim?

Or, did you know, for another example, about how to set the editor to open
on extensionless files?

Or, perhaps, were you aware to always look in the task scheduler for
scheduled tasks - and did you know how to enable the vi command-line
option? Or how to use the SendTo for populating the Windows 10 Cascade
Menu?

I'll wager, based on your own clearly expressed lack of appreciation of
technical merit in your post above, that you, Big Al, feel that technical
topics impinge on your God-given right to troll, Big Al.

Is that right?

Do technical topics impinge on your right to chit-chat endlesssly for your
own amusement, Big Al?

There is a simple solution I offer you, Big Al.

If you want to say a technical topic is worthless, then *prove* that you,
yourself, can stand in the same arena as those who contribute technical
merit.

But, of course, you can't contribute any technical merit, Big Al.
Or can you?
Frank Slootweg
2018-06-28 15:52:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arlen Holder
Post by Big Al
Personally I'm getting tired of Arlen's tutorials. I may be a
minority but I've said my piece and I'll shut up now.
*Can Big Al contribute any technical merit to this Usenet newsgroup?*
Why are you - again - polluting your 'own' thread, while you
continuously claim you want to keep it clean? Hypocritical much?

[More of the usual rants deleted.]
Nil
2018-06-28 17:23:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Slootweg
Why are you - again - polluting your 'own' thread, while you
continuously claim you want to keep it clean? Hypocritical much?
He craves the attention.
Big Al
2018-06-28 16:16:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arlen Holder
*Can Big Al contribute any technical merit to this Usenet newsgroup?*
I HAVE helped people, but I don't feel an urge to jump in. Someone
usually has both the time and knowledge to reply and monitor and keep
replying and helping. I'll toss my one note of help or a link to a
program when I can.
Post by Arlen Holder
I'll wager that there are technical nuances in the original tutorial that
you are completely ignorant of, Big Al, are there not?
Nope, it's just that I'm not interested. And I did say too that I was
probably a minority. So please don't go off a handle. It's only one
opinion, but you've been flooding groups with tutorials. Not sure I
come here for unsolicited tutorials. It's nice to read some of Paul's
explanations on a questioned topic, and he seems to be very
knowledgeable but I don't see starting unsolicited posts.
Post by Arlen Holder
Do you know, for example, of how to wrestle the "turd files" into
submission, in vim?
Haven't tried
Post by Arlen Holder
Or, did you know, for another example, about how to set the editor to open
on extensionless files?
Yes
Post by Arlen Holder
Or, perhaps, were you aware to always look in the task scheduler for
scheduled tasks - and did you know how to enable the vi command-line
option? Or how to use the SendTo for populating the Windows 10 Cascade
Menu?
Yes
Post by Arlen Holder
I'll wager, based on your own clearly expressed lack of appreciation of
technical merit in your post above, that you, Big Al, feel that technical
topics impinge on your God-given right to troll, Big Al.
Is that right?
No! And I'm not trolling. Expressing a dislike for something one time
is not being a troll IMHO. Especially if I give credit to the fact that
I may be in a minority. I'm sure by the discussion following your posts
you are followed.

Besides, I did supply YOU with some help about your tutorial about
reloading a new PC, and you were thankful! So get off your horse.

Al
FredW
2018-06-28 17:05:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Big Al
Post by Arlen Holder
*Can Big Al contribute any technical merit to this Usenet newsgroup?*
I HAVE helped people, but I don't feel an urge to jump in.
Don't worry, be happy
:-)

Don't feed the trolls.
:-(
--
Fred W. (nld)
Arlen Holder
2018-06-29 01:59:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by FredW
Don't feed the trolls.
The decision, in the Q&A model, is how to deal with trolls like FredW.

I've been on Usenet as long as any of you have, where I've seen you trolls
ruin many a newsgroup, simply because you trolls can't possibly add value.

As you must be aware, there are these typical Usenet models:
a. Chit-chat (people are in it for their own amusement)
b. Q&A (people are in it for the technical value added)

The overall posting frequency is completely different for the two models:
a. Chit-chat model (users post 95% to other people's threads)
b. Q&A model (users post 95% to their own threads or only to Q&A threads)

The amount of vested interest is *hugely* different between the models:
a. In the chit-chat model, there is little vested interest in the outcome
b. In the Q&A model, there is a vested interest in the outcome by the OP

Given that difference, there are multiple ways to deal with you trolls:
a. In the chit-chat model, the OP simply ignores you trolls.
b. However, ignoring trolls in the Q&A model is a strategic decision

The choice, in the Q&A model, is how to deal with trolls like FredW.

There are maxims about these trolls such as FredW shows himself to be.
A. They're cowards and bullies.
B. Once they infest a thread, it's already ruined.

The question becomes how do you deal with cowards & bullies in real life?
a. Do you ignore cowards and bullies?
b. Do you confront cowards and bullies with their own actions?

Often, in real life, how you deal with cowards & bullies depends on how
much you care about what those cowards and bully trolls are ruining.
a. If they ruin a chit-chat thread - often you don't care that they ruin it
b. If they ruin a Q&A thread - then the answer is in danger.

Hence, how one deals with you cowardly bullying trolls, FredW, depends on
how much the OP cares about the outcome of the thread.

My personal strategic decision is to confront the cowardly trolls and
bullies with tactics that point out their actions in threads I care about.

That strategy is not designed to save the current thread (it's ruined the
moment worthless cowardly trolls like FredW infest it).

*The goal is to save the *next* Q&A thread from infestation by you, FredW.*
Char Jackson
2018-06-29 04:49:19 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 29 Jun 2018 01:59:23 -0000 (UTC), Arlen Holder
Post by Arlen Holder
Post by FredW
Don't feed the trolls.
The decision, in the Q&A model, is how to deal with trolls like FredW.
<Nearly 50 lines deleted since I've seen them, verbatim, more times than
I can count.>

Are you doing copy/paste when you do these repetitive posts, or does AS
require you to type it from scratch every time?
Arlen Holder
2018-06-29 01:43:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Big Al
Besides, I did supply YOU with some help about your tutorial about
reloading a new PC, and you were thankful! So get off your horse.
Hi Al,
I made a mistake when I responded that way to you.
I publicly apologize for jumping on your case.

I was far too harsh when I responded earlier to your comments.
Mea culpa.

I'm sorry. I misinterpreted your intent and tone.
I do believe that you have purposefully helpful intent.

And that is all that matters!
a. Being purposefully helpful
b. Even if that doesn't actually supply any value.

The *intent* is paramount; the value is secondary.
I will try to NOT jump on your case again, given you are purposefully
helpful (as you can tell, I'm frustrated by the purposefully unhelpful
trolls who are in Usenet merely for their own amusement).

Since my intent is to be helpful, I did work on the tutorial in the
interim, correcting some minor errors and clarifying some topics
and adding some screenshots (and running into a couple of bugs).
****************************************************************************
Quick customized-installation tutorial for setting up gVim on Windows
Tested only on Windows 10, but it should work on all versions of Windows.
Please suggest improvements if you have helpful ideas to benefit others.
****************************************************************************
============================================================================
1. Download the gvim80-586.exe installer from the canonical site:
http://www.vim.org/download.php/
============================================================================
2. Doubleclick on gvim80-586.exe and select the type of install
The default list of checked settings is:
[x]Vim executables and runtime files
[x]Vim console program (vim.exe)
[ ]Create .bat files for command line use
[x]Create icons on the desktop
[x]Add vim to the start menu
[x]Add an edit-with-vim context menu entry
[x]Create a _vimrc if it doesn't exist
[x]Create plugin directories in HOME or VIM
[ ]Create plugin directriesa in VIM
[ ]VisVim extension for MS Visual Studio
[x]Native Language Support

If desired, change those default checked settings to:
[x]Vim executables and runtime files
[x]Vim console program (vim.exe)
[x]Create .bat files for command line use
[x]Create icons on the desktop
[x]Add vim to the start menu
[x]Add an edit-with-vim context menu entry
[x]Create a _vimrc if it doesn't exist
[x]Create plugin directories in HOME or VIM
[ ]Create plugin directriesa in VIM
[ ]VisVim extension for MS Visual Studio
[ ]Native Language Support

Explanation of changes from the default:
- Creating batch files allows vim to be run easily in a command window.
- Native language support isn't all that useful for English speakers.
============================================================================
3. The program will default to installing in C:\Program Files (x86)\Vim
I installed it into C:\app\editor\txt\vim instead.

Note: The default may depend on your operating system.
Note: Use whatever directory structure makes sense to you.

For me, I keep the same task-based hierarchies throughout the years
on all computers, of, for example:
a. I put installers in c:\software\{archiver,browser,cleaner,etc.}
b. I put installed programs in c:\app\{archiver,browser,cleaner,etc.}
c. I put temporary program data in
c:\tmp\{vim,download,screenshots,etc.}
d. Menus mirror functionality: Start > menu >
{archiver,browser,cleaner,etc.}

In the "editor" hierarchy (I never use plurals if they can be avoided),
I organize them by the types of files they "edit" (viewers count):
editor > {audio,hex,pic,pspdf,suite,txt,vid,etc.}

For example, here is my Windows XP native Cascade Menu to VIM 7.4:
<Loading Image...>
For example, here is my Windows 10 native Cascade Menu to VIM 8.0:
<Loading Image...>
Other than honing, the task-based organization survives decades:
<Loading Image...

Note that the installer is in the category of potentially misbehaving
(IMHO) in that it creates *multiple* levels of unasked-for hierarchy,
e.g., if you install into:
C:\app\editor\txt\vim
What you end up with is:
C:\app\editor\txt\vim\vim80\
and
C:\app\editor\txt\vim\vimfiles\
and
C:\app\editor\txt\vim\_vimrc
============================================================================
4. By default, 3 desktop shortcuts are created by the gVim 8.0 installer:
a. gVim 8.0
Default Target = "C:\Program Files (x86)\Vim\vim80\gvim.exe"
Default Startin = %HOMEDRIVE%%HOMEPATH%
b. gVim Easy 8.0
Default Target = "C:\Program Files (x86)\Vim\vim80\gvim.exe" -y
Default Startin = %HOMEDRIVE%%HOMEPATH%
c. gVim Read only 8.0
Default "C:\Program Files (x86)\Vim\vim80\gvim.exe" -R
Default Startin = %HOMEDRIVE%%HOMEPATH%

I delete the latter two & put the remaining shortcut in the menus:
A. Right click on the desktop "gVim 8.0" > SendTo > Heterodox Start Menu
B. Right click on the desktop "gVim 8.0" > SendTo > Cascade Start Menu
C. As desired, organize "gVIM 8.0" for your Orthodox Start Menu
D. As desired, move the remaining "gVIM 8.0" ink to your shortcuts
folder.

Note: The default may depend on your operating system.
Note: See separate notes for efficient setting up of all menus
consistenly by using the right-click SendTo feature on shortcuts.
============================================================================
5. Test the command-line feature to test the batch-file option:

Run a quick test in a command window:
Start > Run > cmd > [Enter] > vim foo

Note that setting the batch file option will create the following files:
%windir%\{evim,gview,gvim,gvimdiff,view,vim,vimdiff,vimtutor}.bat
============================================================================
6. Make gVim the default for editing *.txt text files.

a. Create a sample text file, e.g., C:\tmp\fname.txt
b. RMB on fname.txt > Open with > Choose another app >
Other options > More apps > (scroll down to select)
"VI Improved - a Text Editor"
[x]Always use this app to open .txt files

Notice the "Settings" method does not work because there is no
option for setting vim as the default editor for text files.
A. Start > Settings > Apps > Default apps >
Choose default apps by file type
Change from ".txt ==> Notepad"
Your only choices are:
a. Notepad
b. Registry Editor Utility
c. Wordpad
d. Look for an app in the store
Note: RMB=== right mouse button

Note: The sequence may depend on your operating system.
============================================================================
7. If desired, fix the unsightly ungainly turd files proliferation problem.

Start > cmd > [Enter]
copy c:\app\editor\txt\vim\_vimrc c:\app\editor\txt\vim\_vimrc.orig
mkdir c:\tmp\turd\vim\directory
mkdir c:\tmp\turd\vim\backup
mkdir c:\tmp\turd\vim\undo
vim c:\app\editor\txt\vim\_vimrc

Add the following lines to the beginning of _vimrc:
set
directory=c:\\tmp\turd\vim\directory//,%TMP%,C:\WINDOWS\Temp//,$HOME,.
set backupdir=c:\\tmp\turd\vim\backup//,%TMP%,C:\WINDOWS\Temp//,$HOME,.
set undodir=c:\\tmp\turd\vim\undo//,%TMP%,C:\WINDOWS\Temp//,$HOME,.

Note: If you don't fix this issue, and if you have Windows set to
show all files, then you'll see constant and unsightly pollution
in your current directory. (If that's fine by you, skip this step.)
============================================================================
9. Test turd file dynamics (by creating, editing & changing files).
This optional step is only for those who want to know how things work.

a. Open the three locations in separate Windows file explorer windows:
c:\tmp\turd\vim\directory
c:\tmp\turd\vim\backup
c:\tmp\turd\vim\undo
b. Create, edit, and change a test file to note how turd files react:
RMB > New > Text Document >
c:\app\editor\txt\vim\New Text Document.txt
c. Doubleclick "New Text Document.txt" & observe turd file changes.

directory
Ephemeral %-swp-named swap lock file created when you edit a text file.
fname=C%%app%editor%txt%vim%New Text Document.txt.swp

backup
Persistent ~-named file when you save a text file.
fname=New Text Document.txt~

undo
Persistent %-named txt file when you save changes to a text file.
fname=C%%app%editor%txt%vim%New Text Document.txt
============================================================================
10. If desired, set gVim to edit extensionless files when doubleclicked.

Create this registry file & import into the registry;

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.]
[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.\shell]
[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.\shell\open]
[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.\shell\open\command]
@="\"C:\\app\\editor\\txt\\vim\\vim80\\gvim.exe\" \"%1\""

Note: If desired, set Notepad to edit extensionless files instead:

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.]
[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.\shell]
[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.\shell\open]
[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.\shell\open\command]
@="\"C:\\Windows\\System32\\NOTEPAD.EXE\" \"%1\""
============================================================================
11. If desired, edit or remove the RMB context menu added by the installer.
<Loading Image...>

If you have CCleaner installed, then run
CCleaner: Tools > Startup > Context Menu >
- Enabled = Change Yes to No (if desired)
- Key = File
- Program = gvim
- Publisher = Tianmiao Hu's Developer Studio
- File = C:\app\editor\txt\vim\vim80\gvimext.dll

Note: I checked the Windows task scheduler where no tasks were added.
a. Open an admin command window or powershell using normal procedures.
b. Then start the task scheduler using either this method:
%windir%\system32\control.exe
System and Security > Administrative Tools > TASk Scheduler
Or use this method to open the task scheduler as admin:
%windir%\system32\taskschd.msc /s
c. Select the "Task Scheduler Library" entry (top left)
d. Check for any tasks set up by the installer
(There were none when I checked today.)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
12. If desired, check the setup in the default _vimrc file:

Start > Run > cmd > [Enter]
vim c:\app\editor\txt\vim\_vimrc

Make sure _vimrc sources mswin.vim which maps the ^v to the paste.
(Otherwise you need to use control+q on Windows instead of control+v.)

For example, normally you'd use control+v in this circumstance:
:%s/abc/&<control-v><return>/g
But if the mapping of control+v isn't set, then you have to use this:
:%s/abc/&<control-q><return>/g

NOTE: the syntax is, roughly:
: === begin action
% === on the whole file
s === search
/ === for
abc ==== the characters abc
/ === then
/&<control-v><return> === replace it plus add a carriage return
/ === do that
g === for as many times as you see abc in any given line
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Please test and suggest improvements so that everyone benefits.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Char Jackson
2018-06-29 04:57:11 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 29 Jun 2018 01:43:49 -0000 (UTC), Arlen Holder
Post by Arlen Holder
Post by Big Al
Besides, I did supply YOU with some help about your tutorial about
reloading a new PC, and you were thankful! So get off your horse.
Hi Al,
I made a mistake when I responded that way to you.
I publicly apologize for jumping on your case.
I was far too harsh when I responded earlier to your comments.
Mea culpa.
I'm sorry. I misinterpreted your intent and tone.
I do believe that you have purposefully helpful intent.
And that is all that matters!
a. Being purposefully helpful
b. Even if that doesn't actually supply any value.
The *intent* is paramount; the value is secondary.
I will try to NOT jump on your case again, given you are purposefully
helpful (as you can tell, I'm frustrated by the purposefully unhelpful
trolls who are in Usenet merely for their own amusement).
Since my intent is to be helpful, I did work on the tutorial in the
interim, correcting some minor errors and clarifying some topics
and adding some screenshots (and running into a couple of bugs).
****************************************************************************
Quick customized-installation tutorial for setting up gVim on Windows
Tested only on Windows 10, but it should work on all versions of Windows.
Please suggest improvements if you have helpful ideas to benefit others.
****************************************************************************
How is anyone supposed to find your crappy tutorial when you hide it
behind a well-deserved apology? I'd really like to know.

Since nothing you do is by accident, you obviously don't want it to be
found, whether it's tomorrow, next week, or next month. Are you simply
embarrassed by it? Are you embarrassed that you took a relatively
obscure, by Windows standards, editor and overcomplicated the crap out
of installing it, so now you need to hide it?

<snip 250 lines>
Mayayana
2018-06-29 12:15:02 UTC
Permalink
"Big Al" <***@invalid.com> wrote

| Nope, it's just that I'm not interested. And I did say too that I was
| probably a minority. So please don't go off a handle. It's only one
| opinion, but you've been flooding groups with tutorials. Not sure I
| come here for unsolicited tutorials. It's nice to read some of Paul's
| explanations on a questioned topic, and he seems to be very
| knowledgeable but I don't see starting unsolicited posts.
|

You don't have to explain yourself to Field Marshall
Holder. He's a crank with an imperious, authoritative
style. But he's still a crank. And he periodically changes
his pen name here once enough people find him out.
I stopped looking at his posts when it became clear
that his only real interest is in holding forth. He
sometimes raises interesting questions or useful issues,
but then always digresses, using a combination of
scolding and flattery to browbeat people and hold
onto his soapbox. In short, he's a Usenet denizen
for the Trump era. :)

I'd block his posts, but too many people are having
fun arguing with him. I'd end up seeing it all anyway.

Nor is Vim relevant to most people. It's mainly a
code editor for Linux. Most people don't use code
editors in the first place. Vim. Emacs. Notepad++
on Windows.... There was a discussion about N++ last
week.... All of those represent a view that "real men
do things the hard way".

They're all barebones editors designed for people
who like to rough it, doing things like heavy command
line use or writing Perl. They're the people who are
ambivalent about newfangled gadgets like a mouse
and prefer to trade in esoteric keyboard shortcuts.

None of the editors has much value otherwise.
They can't do much that Notepad can't do. They
provide no particular usefulness for prose writing or word
processing. At the same time, they lack the functionality
of specialized editors that one might use for specific
coding languages. (Though I occasionally use Notepad++
for simple handling of extremely big text files that Notepad
chokes on. N++ is very solidly built.)

Maybe it would be most accurate to say that the
barebones editors are outdated. Most people writing any
kind of code these days will use some kind of IDE
(integrated development environment) or a full-blown,
specialized code editor. An IDE just means that relevant
functionality is built in, so that you don't have to keep
leaving the editor to get things done, and that functions
are provided for specific needs.

A typical example would be a code editor that
displays a popup menu when an object name is typed,
so that one doesn't have to look up and type out a
function provided by that object. Microsoft calls it
"intellisense". It's also called auto-completion. And
it's wildly useful. Visual Studio is Microsoft's IDE, used
by most people who write software for Windows.

Another example would be an HTML editor that
generates an image tag automatically when you
choose an image file. It will measure the width
and height, then generate the HTML. That saves
the task of browsing externally for the image,
opening it in IrfanView to get the w/h, then writing
out the tag:

<IMG SRC="img.jpg" WIDTH=80 HEIGHT=100>

A good editor will do all that. In a barebones
editor you get no help. At most it will provide
a barebones kind of color syntax highlighting, like
you see when viewing source code in a browser.
But even that is limited because barebones editors
don't provide specialization. They give you
highlighting of 30+ languages but achieve that
only by using a lowest common denominator
methodology.

So Vim, Emacs and N++ might occasionally work
as superior, albeit more bloated, alternatives to
Notepad. For coding, they might be compared to
a county fair tractor pull contest. They give you
a good workout and provide a comforting sense
of tradition, but no one needs to pull a tractor
with a horse anymore.
nospam
2018-06-29 13:49:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mayayana
Nor is Vim relevant to most people. It's mainly a
code editor for Linux.
that will be very surprising news to those who use vi(m) on netbsd,
freebsd and mac os, all of which include it (along with emacs) in a
standard install.
Post by Mayayana
Most people don't use code
editors in the first place.
that's because most people don't write code.

however, those who *do* write code are very likely to use what you're
calling a code editor, including vi/emacs, along with numerous others.
Post by Mayayana
Maybe it would be most accurate to say that the
barebones editors are outdated.
actually, it would be most accurate to say you do not realize why that
sentence is hilarious.
Char Jackson
2018-06-28 16:28:53 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 28 Jun 2018 14:19:10 -0000 (UTC), Arlen Holder
Post by Arlen Holder
Post by Big Al
Personally I'm getting tired of Arlen's tutorials. I may be a
minority but I've said my piece and I'll shut up now.
*Can Big Al contribute any technical merit to this Usenet newsgroup?*
It's usually a good idea to read a newsgroup for a while before posting.
Had you done so, you wouldn't have had to ask the question above.

In case you're averse to reading, the answer is yes.
Arlen Holder
2018-06-28 14:41:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Char Jackson
As you may know, there are many editors available. Most won't require a
tutorial to install or use.
I use and recommend Notepad++ from https://notepad-plus-plus.org/.
Thank you Char Jackson for your advice that Notepad++ is a text editor.
There may be noobs here who don't know that Notepad++ is a text editor.

*Notepad++ is, by all accounts, _simpler_ for noobs to learn than is vim.*

For comparison of Notepad++ to scores of similar text editors, see:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_text_editors

See also these verbatim observations:
1. https://www.slant.co/versus/42/44/~vim_vs_notepad
"Vim is ranked 1st while Notepad++ is ranked 13th."

2. https://stackoverflow.com/questions/5811188/vim-and-notepad
"Vim is about touch typist shortcuts. Notepad++ is a usual text editor."

3. https://www.pythoncentral.io/best-text-editors-for-python-development/
"Unless you're tied to Notepad++ for some reason, ...one of the
other editors ... is probably a better choice."

4. http://blog.liveedu.tv/10-best-text-editors-programming-2016/
"Notepad++ is for those who want a simplistic UI"

5. https://www.lifehacker.com.au/2011/07/the-best-programming-text-editor-for-windows/
"If the Notepad++ ugly factor gets to you, SublimeText is a more
attractive but also considerably more expensive option."

For me, & many others, the key reason to use VIM is efficiency.
VIM is not for the technically incompetent though - by all accounts.

Many of those of us who are highly technical, dual boot to Linux daily.
Having the same powerful editor on both platforms is an efficiency boon.

It's nice that a text editor like Notepadd++ is simple for you to use.
Jonathan N. Little
2018-06-28 14:50:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arlen Holder
Post by Char Jackson
As you may know, there are many editors available. Most won't require a
tutorial to install or use.
I use and recommend Notepad++ from https://notepad-plus-plus.org/.
Thank you Char Jackson for your advice that Notepad++ is a text editor.
There may be noobs here who don't know that Notepad++ is a text editor.
*Notepad++ is, by all accounts, _simpler_ for noobs to learn than is vim.*
Real men use EDLIN...
--
Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
Big Al
2018-06-28 16:18:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jonathan N. Little
Post by Arlen Holder
Post by Char Jackson
As you may know, there are many editors available. Most won't require a
tutorial to install or use.
I use and recommend Notepad++ from https://notepad-plus-plus.org/.
Thank you Char Jackson for your advice that Notepad++ is a text editor.
There may be noobs here who don't know that Notepad++ is a text editor.
*Notepad++ is, by all accounts, _simpler_ for noobs to learn than is vim.*
Real men use EDLIN...
Haven't seen that since years back, maybe SCO Unix years in the 70's.
Frank Slootweg
2018-06-28 17:29:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Big Al
Post by Jonathan N. Little
Post by Arlen Holder
Post by Char Jackson
As you may know, there are many editors available. Most won't require a
tutorial to install or use.
I use and recommend Notepad++ from https://notepad-plus-plus.org/.
Thank you Char Jackson for your advice that Notepad++ is a text editor.
There may be noobs here who don't know that Notepad++ is a text editor.
*Notepad++ is, by all accounts, _simpler_ for noobs to learn than is vim.*
Real men use EDLIN...
Or, to stay a bit on topic:

Real men use ed(1)...
Post by Big Al
Haven't seen that since years back, maybe SCO Unix years in the 70's.
No wonder, because EDLIN is an (external) *DOS* command! :-)

<https://www.computerhope.com/edlin.htm>
Big Al
2018-06-28 21:42:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Slootweg
Post by Big Al
Post by Jonathan N. Little
Post by Arlen Holder
Post by Char Jackson
As you may know, there are many editors available. Most won't require a
tutorial to install or use.
I use and recommend Notepad++ from https://notepad-plus-plus.org/.
Thank you Char Jackson for your advice that Notepad++ is a text editor.
There may be noobs here who don't know that Notepad++ is a text editor.
*Notepad++ is, by all accounts, _simpler_ for noobs to learn than is vim.*
Real men use EDLIN...
Real men use ed(1)...
Post by Big Al
Haven't seen that since years back, maybe SCO Unix years in the 70's.
No wonder, because EDLIN is an (external) *DOS* command! :-)
<https://www.computerhope.com/edlin.htm>
Oh well.
Nil
2018-06-28 17:34:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Big Al
Post by Jonathan N. Little
Real men use EDLIN...
Haven't seen that since years back, maybe SCO Unix years in the 70's.
EDLIN was an MS-DOS streaming editor. I bet Unix had something similar.
Ian Jackson
2018-06-28 21:01:55 UTC
Permalink
In message <ph31p7$pja$***@dont-email.me>, Big Al <***@invalid.com>
writes
Post by Big Al
Post by Jonathan N. Little
Post by Arlen Holder
Post by Char Jackson
As you may know, there are many editors available. Most won't require a
tutorial to install or use.
I use and recommend Notepad++ from https://notepad-plus-plus.org/.
Thank you Char Jackson for your advice that Notepad++ is a text editor.
There may be noobs here who don't know that Notepad++ is a text editor.
*Notepad++ is, by all accounts, _simpler_ for noobs to learn than is vim.*
Real men use EDLIN...
Haven't seen that since years back, maybe SCO Unix years in the 70's.
Isn't that VI (or is that just Xenix)?
--
Ian
Arlen Holder
2018-06-29 00:35:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jonathan N. Little
Real men use EDLIN...
In effect, when you hit the wrong buttons, at the very least, in vi (aka
vim for our purposes), you're in ed often, depending on how used to the
keyboard your hand muscles are.

One of my earlier tutorials was a treatise showing all the known uses of
"DEBUG" in DOS, which is reminiscent of what you speak about (I also wrote
tutorials on assembly language tricks in DOS and wire-wrapping the Motorola
68701 - where all my SAMS books fell apart from overuse!).

I no longer have my brown TI TTL bible or blue ADI linear devices handbooks
that we all had on our shelves, but, I do still have the Peter Norton and
Bernard GroB classics that most of you (along with me) cut your teeth on
many decades ago when PC's evolved...
<Loading Image...>
Char Jackson
2018-06-28 16:24:02 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 28 Jun 2018 14:41:12 -0000 (UTC), Arlen Holder
Post by Arlen Holder
Post by Char Jackson
As you may know, there are many editors available. Most won't require a
tutorial to install or use.
I use and recommend Notepad++ from https://notepad-plus-plus.org/.
Thank you Char Jackson for your advice that Notepad++ is a text editor.
There may be noobs here who don't know that Notepad++ is a text editor.
If you slow down and read for comprehension, you might see that my
primary point regarding Notepad++ was that anyone can install and use it
without needing a so-called tutorial.
Arlen Holder
2018-06-29 00:35:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Char Jackson
If you slow down and read for comprehension, you might see that my
primary point regarding Notepad++ was that anyone can install and use it
without needing a so-called tutorial.
Nothing needs a "tutorial" if all you do is keep the defaults.

For example, I just installed the full offline Edge Privacy Browser.

I'll bet you your life that you, Char Jackson, could never accomplish the
that browser installation tasks such as putting the browser where you want
it to go, and to obtain the full offline installer (as I had to look both
of those up myself - and I haven't found the solution yet to the first
problem - at least not directly).

If all you do is take the defaults, then almost any installation is simple
(except those, like, oh, say, VirtualBox, which have a *lot* of settings
that need to be right during installation).

The point is that you seem to think the whole world thinks as
simplistically as you do - but they don't.

Lots of people don't accept the defaults, Char Jackson, even if you always
do.

If all you do is accept the defaults, I agree - you don't need anything.
Char Jackson
2018-06-29 05:07:36 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 29 Jun 2018 00:35:54 -0000 (UTC), Arlen Holder
Post by Arlen Holder
For example, I just installed the full offline Edge Privacy Browser.
That's what qualifies as a noteworthy accomplishment now? Has the bar
fallen that low?
Post by Arlen Holder
I'll bet you your life that you, Char Jackson, could never accomplish the
that browser installation tasks such as putting the browser where you want
it to go, and to obtain the full offline installer (as I had to look both
of those up myself - and I haven't found the solution yet to the first
problem - at least not directly).
That's a dangerous escalation. Please don't do it again. You don't have
my permission to bet my life - on anything.
Nil
2018-06-28 17:32:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Char Jackson
As you may know, there are many editors available. Most won't
require a tutorial to install or use.
Nor does gVim - installation is click and go. Configuring it and using
it are separate subjects.

I suppose after 30 more tedious, unnecessary, incorrect tutorials he'll
be doing ones about things like "How to Part your Hair", "How to
Recognize a Spoon", and "How to Save the World with my Devilish Logic".
Post by Char Jackson
I use and recommend Notepad++ from https://notepad-plus-plus.org/.
Good choice. It's got lots of useful features, it's free, it's
extensible, and it's actively developed.

I use vim, too, for certain things. I have a couple of other text
editors - they all have their specialties.
Arlen Holder
2018-06-29 00:39:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Nil
Nor does gVim - installation is click and go. Configuring it and using
it are separate subjects.
I suppose after 30 more tedious, unnecessary, incorrect tutorials
I agree with Nil that you only need the tutorial if you want to customize
how the tools work.

For example, if you want to clean up where the lock/swap/undo files that
gVim makes go, that's where the tutorial helps others.
Post by Nil
I use vim, too, for certain things.
Do you simply acquiesce when the turd files pollute your current folder?
Nil
2018-06-29 02:07:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arlen Holder
Do you simply acquiesce when the turd files pollute your current folder?
I read the documentation on how to control them. Then I collected them
all in one place, gave them all pet names, and smiled gently as they
gyred and gimbled in the wabe.

We can meet over Sanka to chat about it further. Monday at 11?
Frank Slootweg
2018-06-28 15:52:55 UTC
Permalink
Arlen Holder <***@nospam.net> wrote:
[...]
Post by Arlen Holder
============================================================================
7. If desired, fix the unsightly ungainly turd files proliferation problem.
Start > cmd > [Enter]
copy c:\app\editor\txt\vim\_vimrc c:\app\editor\txt\vim\_vimrc.orig
mkdir c:\tmp\turd\vim\directory
mkdir c:\tmp\turd\vim\backup
mkdir c:\tmp\turd\vim\undo
vim c:\app\editor\txt\vim\_vimrc
[...]

IMO you should not use your personal/non-standard folder hierarchy in
this tutorial / these examples. It adds no value :-) and just makes it
less valuable / more difficult for others.

For example when they get to section 7., users will not have c:\app,
so the very first copy command will fail.

I assume your tutorial is intended for less experience users, because
more experienced users would not need one, so IMO you should use the
standard folder hierarchy.
Arlen Holder
2018-06-29 00:59:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank Slootweg
IMO you should not use your personal/non-standard folder hierarchy in
this tutorial / these examples. It adds no value :-) and just makes it
less valuable / more difficult for others.
You bring up a good related point, Frank Slootweg, which I know well.

1. Lots of noobs "just give up" (not realizing how much control they have)
2. Lots of noobs "turn their brains off" when installing & using programs

Philosophically, some may think of their device as Microsoft's computer,
but I consider it MY computer, not Microsoft's or Dell's or Adobe's or
Apple's or Google's computer so, IMHO, *YOU get to decide where programs
belong*.

Pragmatically, like it or not, you NEED functional hierarchies of:
a. Where you save your installers on your computer
b. Where you install your programs into
c. Where those programs store their default data
d. What your menus look like (cascade, heterodox, & orthodox)
etc.

Assuming it's YOU who owns the computer (and not them).... then... your
philosophy seems to be "let them control everything", where mine is clearly
"I control where things go".

a. I put installers in c:\software\{archiver,browser,cleaner,etc.}
b. I put installed programs in c:\app\{archiver,browser,cleaner,etc.}
c. I put temporary program data in c:\tmp\{vim,download,screenshots,etc.}
d. Menus mirror hierarchy, Start > menu > {archiver,browser,cleaner,etc.}

Philosophically, if you CONTROL the computer, then you have to think.
If you philosophically yield control of your computer to Microsoft or Dell
or Adobe or Apple or Google, etc., then I agree, you can turn your brain
off.

I'm sure turning the brain off is comfortable for a lot of people.
But some people still control their computer.

And for that, you have to think about what you wish to control.
Post by Frank Slootweg
For example when they get to section 7., users will not have c:\app,
so the very first copy command will fail.
I've been using PCs since the day they were born (and before that, UNIX and
DEC flavors), and I don't think I had a computer once in my life that I
wasn't the one who controlled where things go, even when PCs were young:
<Loading Image...>

Philosophically, there are those who own the computer; and,
there are those who are owned by the computer.

Pick one.

If people simply let Microsoft/Adobe/Apple/Google/etc/ run amok on their
computers, then I agree with you. Not only do they not need brains, but
they certainly don't need a tutorial for how to install a program.

All they need, sans brains, is a mouse.

The tutorial wasn't written for the brain-dead user.
Post by Frank Slootweg
I assume your tutorial is intended for less experience users, because
more experienced users would not need one, so IMO you should use the
standard folder hierarchy.
Philosophically, it's not surprising that we differ, Frank Slootweg.

I prefer to provide examples of BEST PRACTICES.

It's not a good practice to allow your programs to OWN YOU, IMHO.

Philosophically, while you seem to advise allowing the computer to own you,
I promulgate a strategy and tactics that ensures I own the computer.

STRATEGY: All programs go where they belong, on all your computers, and
that spot is the same spot throughout the decades.

TACTICS: Learn how to control where the programs go, how to build mirror
menus, and where the programs put their ancillary data.

All my tutorials over the decades exemplify best-practice strategy and
tactics.
Char Jackson
2018-06-29 04:59:49 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 29 Jun 2018 00:59:09 -0000 (UTC), Arlen Holder
Post by Arlen Holder
Post by Frank Slootweg
IMO you should not use your personal/non-standard folder hierarchy in
this tutorial / these examples. It adds no value :-) and just makes it
less valuable / more difficult for others.
You bring up a good related point, Frank Slootweg, which I know well.
1. Lots of noobs "just give up" (not realizing how much control they have)
2. Lots of noobs "turn their brains off" when installing & using programs
Philosophically, some may think of their device as Microsoft's computer,
but I consider it MY computer, not Microsoft's or Dell's or Adobe's or
Apple's or Google's computer so, IMHO, *YOU get to decide where programs
belong*.
a. Where you save your installers on your computer
b. Where you install your programs into
c. Where those programs store their default data
d. What your menus look like (cascade, heterodox, & orthodox)
etc.
Assuming it's YOU who owns the computer (and not them).... then... your
philosophy seems to be "let them control everything", where mine is clearly
"I control where things go".
Minor correction: your behavior isn't controlled by your philosophy,
it's controlled by your medical condition. You couldn't change if you
wanted to.
Frank Slootweg
2018-06-29 20:09:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Arlen Holder
Post by Frank Slootweg
IMO you should not use your personal/non-standard folder hierarchy in
this tutorial / these examples. It adds no value :-) and just makes it
less valuable / more difficult for others.
You bring up a good related point, Frank Slootweg, which I know well.
1. Lots of noobs "just give up" (not realizing how much control they have)
2. Lots of noobs "turn their brains off" when installing & using programs
[And some 70 more lines 'justifying' his personal/non-standard folder
hierarchy.]
Post by Arlen Holder
Philosophically, there are those who own the computer; and,
there are those who are owned by the computer.
Pick one.
If people simply let Microsoft/Adobe/Apple/Google/etc/ run amok on their
computers, then I agree with you. Not only do they not need brains, but
they certainly don't need a tutorial for how to install a program.
All they need, sans brains, is a mouse.
The tutorial wasn't written for the brain-dead user.
IOW, you don't give a shit whether or not your 'tutorial' is useful to
anybody else. As long as (you think) you can feel superior by posturing
your silly warped (non-)solutions, it's fine by you.

So your claimed "intent" of being "purposefully helpful", is yet
another of your many lies.

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