Discussion:
SOLVED: How ot back up data of varying sizes to multipe non-linked DVDs with efficiency
(too old to reply)
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-04 03:03:46 UTC
Permalink
SOLVED:
Back up data by efficiently filling multiple DVDs as individual disks
Loading Image...

Strategy:
a. Back up large data to multiple individual non-sequential DVDs
b. As efficiently as possible (i.e., by filling up each of the DVDs)
c. Without needing proprietary stitching software for use in a decade

Tactic:
A. Create one 4,482,269KB encrypted container file (password = spacekey)
B. Copy that DVD-sized container file as many times as you like
C. Mount those container files as Removable Disk Drives using Veracrypt

Steps:
1. Run Veracrypt (or Truecrypt) & create a 4,482,269KB container file
2. The password (unfortunately) must exist, but it will take 1 character
3. Choose "Large File" if you wish NTFS instead of FAT32 format containers
4. Once you have one empty 4,482,269KB container file, copy it as needed
5. Mount as many of the DVD-sized container files as you think you need
6. Copy as many files as will fit in the container & burn to DVD

http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/03/04/dvd_sized_dirs.jpg

NOTE: If you wish to keep the encryption on the resulting DVD, you can
simply unmount the removable disk & burn the filled container file;
otherwise burn the contents of the removable disk to DVD media.

What we don't want, for this method, is any forced connection between the
DVDs, as that makes recovery in a decade problematic. The inherent beauty
of this method is that you never have to /calculate/ or back out data, as
you only put into the container as much as will fit on a single-sided DVD.
Auric__
2018-03-04 03:59:12 UTC
Permalink
You know, putting "SOLVED" in the subject like that suggests that you're
solving someone's problem. Stop doing that, and instead just say what you've
done.
--
- The enemy of my enemy is my ally.
- They aren't enemies.
- The friend of my enemy is an unwitting dupe.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-04 04:31:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Auric__
You know, putting "SOLVED" in the subject like that suggests that you're
solving someone's problem. Stop doing that, and instead just say what you've
done.
Hmmm.... I'm on a lot of Linux forums, where you change the title to
"SOLVED" when the original problem is solved, which is it, in this case.

But I can remove that the next time I post a tribal-knowledge solution if
it bothers you. I have no problem with that.

The main point is that this method works under the specific circumstances
of making it easier to back up to multiple DVDs without ever having to
calculate the file and folder sizes, and where the end result isn't
beholden to any archival method, particularly one that cares about the
sequence order of the DVDs themselves.

What I found by help from others is the container size (of 4,482,269KB)
and the fact that you can create just one container, as a template, and
copy it as many times as you like.

In practice, you'll likely copy it only a few times because once you burn
the data to a DVD, you can clean out the container file and re-use it.

In my case, I didn't want the inherent encryption that comes with the
process, but others might want their DVDs to be encrypted, in which case
they can skip a step and just burn the container file to the DVD.

Of course, burning the encrypted container file (instead of burning the
cleartext mounted removable drive) brings the risk that the encryption tool
has to be available ten or twenty years from now when you want to access
the data, so I prefer to burn the data in cleartext.

Of course, there are other ways to create DVD-size-limited folders on
Windows, but I've tried a few of them, and they're a pain compared to this
method, which is almost trivial to implement.

The reason for posting the solution is to add to the tribal knowledge of
the group, and for the group to add additional value, if possible.
wasbit
2018-03-05 10:53:09 UTC
Permalink
Can't see original post so no attribution.

There are a number of freeware file sizing programmes to fit various media
types, eg

CD/DVD/BR Compiler - http://www.kifoth.de/jane/misc/
Disc Archiver - http://www.broadexsystems.com/
Ignition - http://www.kcsoftwares.com/index.php?ignition
SizeMe (floppy,zip,cd/dvd) - http://lars.werner.no/?page_id=2
The New Fileorder (tnfo4en) - http://www.wild-zone.de/service-downloads.php
--
Regards
wasbit
VanguardLH
2018-03-04 09:52:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Back up data by efficiently filling multiple DVDs as individual disks
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/03/04/dvd_sized_dirs.jpg
a. Back up large data to multiple individual non-sequential DVDs
b. As efficiently as possible (i.e., by filling up each of the DVDs)
c. Without needing proprietary stitching software for use in a decade
A. Create one 4,482,269KB encrypted container file (password = spacekey)
B. Copy that DVD-sized container file as many times as you like
C. Mount those container files as Removable Disk Drives using Veracrypt
1. Run Veracrypt (or Truecrypt) & create a 4,482,269KB container file
2. The password (unfortunately) must exist, but it will take 1 character
3. Choose "Large File" if you wish NTFS instead of FAT32 format containers
4. Once you have one empty 4,482,269KB container file, copy it as needed
5. Mount as many of the DVD-sized container files as you think you need
6. Copy as many files as will fit in the container & burn to DVD
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/03/04/dvd_sized_dirs.jpg
NOTE: If you wish to keep the encryption on the resulting DVD, you can
simply unmount the removable disk & burn the filled container file;
otherwise burn the contents of the removable disk to DVD media.
What we don't want, for this method, is any forced connection between the
DVDs, as that makes recovery in a decade problematic. The inherent beauty
of this method is that you never have to /calculate/ or back out data, as
you only put into the container as much as will fit on a single-sided DVD.
"Solved:" is the wrong prefix. Use "Announce:" or "Ann:" to declare an
announcement!

Since you did not attribute someone's original thread (by replying to
it), you did not solve anyone's problem. You made an announcement.
mechanic
2018-03-04 11:04:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by VanguardLH
"Solved:" is the wrong prefix. Use "Announce:" or "Ann:" to
declare an announcement!
Since you did not attribute someone's original thread (by
replying to it), you did not solve anyone's problem. You made an
announcement.
Yes, "Hey look at me, I'm a clever boy" might be more appropriate!
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-04 18:10:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by mechanic
Yes, "Hey look at me, I'm a clever boy" might be more appropriate!
WTF?

Think about that statement, and then think about your own motives for
making that statement, in the context of the fact that I'm completely
anonymous (in that /all/ my headers are fabricated).

Think about that.

Think about /your/ motive (aka, your own internal emotions), for saying
what you just said, in light of the fact that I have, anonymously,
contributed to the ADDED VALUE of the tribal knowledge of Usenet for
DECADES, all anonymously.

Whom do you think /created/ the tinyurl archives of this ng in the first
place, for example? Did you? (HINT: I know the answer to that question.)

Despite /your/ emotional problems, my motives are pure.
A. The question is extremely common of how to limit folder size on Windows
B. Almost all the answers on the net are far more complex than this one
C. You'd be hard pressed to find /this answer/ on the net.

Hence, I posit, despite /your/ emotional problems, that the archives will
show a future user how better to limit folder size on Windows (with the
addition of symlinks, which I didn't put in the answer because it was
specific to DVD but symlinks make it general to Windows).

You can continue to needlessly pollute this thread with /your/ emotional
hangups, but I'm going to stick to the facts, and add to the overall tribal
knowledge of this newgroup, as I have done for decades, anonymously.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-03-06 16:47:14 UTC
Permalink
In message <c2s01uoahwzd$.t83e825cwusc$***@40tude.net>, ultred ragnusen
<***@ragnusen.com> writes:
[]
Post by ultred ragnusen
A. The question is extremely common of how to limit folder size on Windows
[]
I think I may have _occasionally_ wondered it - but I actually can't
_remember_ ever doing so. I certainly can't _remember_ ever seeing
anyone else ask it - so I don't think "extremely common" is valid.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Bother," said Pooh, as he tasted the bacon in his sandwich.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-06 18:01:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I think I may have _occasionally_ wondered it - but I actually can't
_remember_ ever doing so. I certainly can't _remember_ ever seeing
anyone else ask it - so I don't think "extremely common" is valid.
Continuing to be responsive to your concerns, I agree that your point is
valid and fair enough that I have only the search record to indicate that
the question has been asked and answered numerous times, but I have not
gone to the trouble of counting the actual number of times someone has
asked how to limit folder size in Windows.

Given both the lack of value in answering numerous questions of whether
it's just common or actually very common, our lack of numerical precision
aside, let's just agree that the question has been asked before, so that we
can end this useless emotional pollution of the thread, and, let's agree
that different technical answers should suffice, where none of which, to
date anyway, are as simple as this:
C:\> limit-folder-size 100MB folderA folderB folderC

It seems the /simplest/ viable method was the one proposed by Andy Burns:
C:\> imdisk -a -s 100M -m Z: -p "/fs:ntfs /q /y"
C:\> mklink /d folderA Z:

The /simplest/ non-ephemeral solution that I can come up with so far is:
a. Create a 100MB encrypted file container & copy it to files A B & C
b. Mount each as a removable drive & link to folderA folderB & folderC

Other possible solutions are to use partitions, FSRM disk quotas, Windows
VHDs, symlinks & junctions, VirtualBox VHDs, VMToolKit, WinRAR, the Windows
Recycle Bin, Veritas Storage Exec, Truecrypt, or BitLocker.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-04 18:10:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by VanguardLH
Since you did not attribute someone's original thread (by replying to
it), you did not solve anyone's problem. You made an announcement.
Maybe I should have called it a PSA?

I think the solution is akin to (but different from) for example, this one:
http://www.tech-recipes.com/rx/2435/winrar_limit_volume_sizes_fit_cd_dvd/

Given it's a common question that has no good answers (IMHO) until now, I'm
surprised about the objection to the title, but your objection is fair
enough that there was no attribute to a specifically stated problem in the
OP, where we all know the question is extremely common of how best to limit
the size of a folder on Windows.

Unfortunately, I don't know of Windows 10 or Windows 7 archives on Google
Groups for which to belatedly point to those references for you, where I
can easily find a related question on alt.backup-software
https://tinyurl.com/alt-backup-software

For example.
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/alt.backup-software/RxOFnzuhuCo/HaNEhULnDH4J;context-place=searchin/microsoft.public.windowsxp.general/windows$20virtual$20disk|sort:date

Or in alt.comp.freeware
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/alt.comp.freeware

For example:
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/alt.comp.freeware/aGNMMOe_ycg[26-50]
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/alt.comp.freeware/23Ba2Ga7OLg/pl0IWiFo6LIJ;context-place=forum/alt.comp.freeware
etc

Googling outside of Usenet for the common question of limiting the size of
a Windows folder, the most common answers are legendary, but the search
results come with what I consdier the wrong answer, given that they never
include the far easier method shown in this thread as a PSA.
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=limit+size+windows+folders+dvd+sized

For example:
http://www.techsupportforum.com/forums/f217/limit-max-size-of-windows-folder-500221.html

Bearing in mind that it's trivial to symlink the removable drive to a
Winodws folder, you'll note that /all/ the answers for how to limit the
size of a Windows folder are /far/ more complex than this method I hit upon
independently.

For example:
https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_7-files/can-i-impose-a-size-limit-for-a-windows-folder/61a9155e-0d70-44dd-b4da-78c137775bf0
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/265100-45-limit-file-size-folder
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/532775/is-it-possible-to-limit-folder-size-in-a-windows-environment
https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/windows/en-US/02c8fc41-16a1-4201-9206-669d2b663316/how-to-restrict-a-folder-size?forum=winserverfiles

Given that the question of limiting Windows folder sizes is a common
question that has horridly complex answers all over the net, I thought it
would be useful to put into the tribal knowledge archives this simple
solution.
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=how+to+limit+windows+folder+size

Notice how horridly complex and hard-to-change /all/ those answers are,
compared to the trivially simple method shown in this now-archived PSA.

This method:
a. Works <== that's most important!
b. Is the easiest method ever proposed <=== that's very important!
c. Is easy to resize <=== all the other methods are not easy to resize
d. Is free <== to be expected of any tribal solution for general use
e. Has encryption <== a bonus or a flaw, depending on your needs
f. Is generally unknown <== just look at the horrid answers on the net!
g. Requires either Truecrypt or Veracrypt <== that's a flaw
h. Limited to a maximum of 26 - default (alphabetical) size-limited folders

The suggested methods for size-limited folders on Windows include
- NTFS disk quotas (try it if you love complexity that doesn't work)
- File Server Resource Manager Quotas (similar if not exactly the above)
- Partitions (just try to resize them if you want to see the difference)
- Virtual Hard Disks (compare the ease of .vhd method to this one!)
- Other tools (e.g., Truecrypt, WinRar, VirtualBox, VMToolKit, etc.)
- (what else?)

Here are some links to proposed solutions to this common problem:
https://www.experts-exchange.com/questions/23786205/How-to-I-limit-the-maximum-size-of-a-folder.html

Virtual Hard Disk:
https://www.howtogeek.com/howto/5291/how-to-create-a-virtual-hard-drive-in-windows-7/
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/microsoft.public.virtualserver/EmQ7I2kWBj0/8G1DYaM2l5QJ

WinRar:
http://www.tech-recipes.com/rx/2435/winrar_limit_volume_sizes_fit_cd_dvd/

Hence, I posit, with the addition of a symlink (mklink, ntfs junctions),
there is no easier method of limiting folder size on Windows that /anyone/
has ever come up with other than this simple method.
--
See also mklink & junctions
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/previous-versions/windows/it-pro/windows-server-2008-R2-and-2008/cc753194%28v=ws.10%29
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/downloads/junction
Andy Burns
2018-03-04 18:18:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Limited to a maximum of 26
If you mount them to a folder, rather than assigning a drive letter, you
can have more than 26 volumes.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-04 20:05:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy Burns
Post by ultred ragnusen
Limited to a maximum of 26
If you mount them to a folder, rather than assigning a drive letter, you
can have more than 26 volumes.
I think your helpful suggestion is great as it allows anyone to have any
number of size-limited folders in Windows, but I don't understand your
suggestion (yet) in that I don't know how to "mount" the encrypted
container to a folder.

That same question, for example, was asked here:
https://community.spiceworks.com/topic/169635-mounting-truecrypt-encrypted-container-as-a-folder

But Truecrypt (BoxCrypt, Veracrypt, VHD, etc.) all mount to a /drive/
first, and only after that, can we link to a folder (AFAIK).

I'd be happy to be wrong, where we all know is how to mount one of the 26
possible existing removable disks to a folder:
a. At an elevated command prompt, given removable disk Z:, run this:
b. mklink /d folder01 Z:
x, That will report: "symbolic link created for folder01 <<===>> Z:"
But that method still is limited to 26 concurrent drive letters, is it not?

Likewise, we all know how to mount a partition to a folder:
1. Run the Windows 10 Disk Management Tool:
Start > Run > diskmgmt.msc
2. Create a 4.3GB disk partition (also known as a volume it seems):
Right click in unallocated space & select "Create Simple Volume"
Follow the wizard to completion (assume you created drive Z:)
3. Symlink that new desktop folder to that newly created partition Z:
mklink /d C:\ForBurning\Disc01 Z:
But that method also is limited to 26 concurrent drive letters, I think.

There are some people who size-limit a single special folder, which is easy
to do if that single folder is the Recycle Bin, but that limits us to 1
size-limited folder.
Loading Image...

This suggests other tricks to size limit any number of folders on Windows,
one of which is to 3rd-party software named "Veritas Storage Exec"
https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc938945.aspx

But I don't yet know what you're suggesting, such that we can overcome the
26-drive limit when limiting the size of Windows folders.
https://www.howtogeek.com/98195/how-to-mount-a-hard-drive-as-a-folder-on-your-windows-pc/

It would be great to mount an encrypted file container (bitlocker,
truecrypt, veracrypt, etc.) as a folder if that overcomes the 26-drive
limit of Windows. But I don't see how, yet, to mount them as a folder.
https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa365733%28v=vs.85%29.aspx

Can you kindly expound on how we can do what you suggest, which would be
useful to overcome the 26 numerical limit when creating size-limited
folders on Windows?
Andy Burns
2018-03-05 15:54:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
I don't understand your
suggestion (yet) in that I don't know how to "mount" the encrypted
container to a folder.
Since encryption is not your aim, try ImDisk instead of vera/truecrypt
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-06 17:57:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy Burns
Post by ultred ragnusen
I don't understand your
suggestion (yet) in that I don't know how to "mount" the encrypted
container to a folder.
Since encryption is not your aim, try ImDisk instead of vera/truecrypt
Thanks Andy Burns for adding value to the thread topic, and for not wasting
everyone's time with emotional pollution!

I presume this is the canonical location for ImDisk downloads?
https://sourceforge.net/projects/imdisk-toolkit/files/

The ImDisk Virtual Disk Driver method is very simple, and very useful!
C:\> imdisk -a -s 512M -m Z: -p "/fs:ntfs /q /y"
C:\> mklink /d folderA Z:

-a initializes the virtual disk
-s 512M is the size, 512 MegaBytes
(Other choices are b, k, m, g, t, K, M, G, or T)

These denote a number of 512-byte blocks, thousand bytes, million bytes,
billion bytes, trillion bytes, KB, MB, GB, and TB, respectively

-m Z: sets up the mount point a.k.a. the drive letter, Z:

-p "fs:ntfs /q /y" formats the drive
(-p's parameters are actually for Windows' format program)

So, if you want the RAM disk in a different filesystem, just change ntfs to
fat (FAT16) or fat32 (FAT32)

This answers the question of how to easily created size-limited folders in
Windows, using an ephemeral RAM disk which gains us speed and simplicity,
and with the added advantage that encryption need not be involved!

Thank you for adding value to every post!
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-06 19:36:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
This answers the question of how to easily created size-limited folders in
Windows, using an ephemeral RAM disk which gains us speed and simplicity,
and with the added advantage that encryption need not be involved!
For the tribal record, here is my personal log file of my one and only test
of Andy Burns' helpful, non-emotional, and on-topic suggested method, which
has a huge advantage in simplicity & speed, at only the cost of
ephemerality. http://i.cubeupload.com/GZHdJy.jpg

As all my log files contain enough detail to be reproduced, this will be
archived in the tribal records for others to benefit from in the future.

Downloaded the tool from:
https://sourceforge.net/projects/imdisk-toolkit/files/
It tries to install by default to C:\Program Files\ImDisk
I put ImDisk in C:\app\archiver\imdisk
It works at the command line so it seems to have added a magical path
outside of the regular path (which it did not change) and which appears to
be outside of the App Paths key.
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\App Paths

When you install, you are asked:
[x]ImDisk Virtual Disk Driver (required)
This includes a Control Panel applet, a command-line tool, the
imdisk.exe, and interfaces to manage volumes from File Explorer
context menus
[x]DiscUtils library (uses .NET Framework 4)
Required to mount advanced image file formats like VHD, VDI,
VMDK, and some others. Also adds a command-line tool to the
installation folder, DiscUtilsDevio.exe, and a dedicated dialog
box to use the librar yfrom the file context menu in File Explorer
[x]RamDisk Configuration Tool
Allows you to configure RAM Disks
Options:
[x]Enable entries in context menus
Adds entries to the drive context menu & file context menu to
manage ImDisk volumes and images files directly from File Explorer
[x]Request administrator rights in Explorer
Solves UAC issues with "Save disk contents as image file" and
"Unmount ImDisk Virtual Disk" in the drive context menu
[x]Create shortcuts on desktop
Creates three desktop shortcuts:
ImDisk Virtual Disk Driver (Control Panel applet)
Mount Image File (C:\app\archiver\imdisk\MountImg.exe)
RamDisk Configuration (C:\app\archiver\imdisk\RamDiskUI.exe)

This is the first test
C:\Users\ultred\Desktop>imdisk -a -s 512M -m Z: -p "/fs:ntfs /q /y"
Creating device...
Created device 0: Z: -> Image in memory
Formatting disk Z:...
Access Denied as you do not have sufficient privileges.
You have to invoke this utility running in elevated mode.
Cannot open volume for direct access.
Notifying applications...
Done.

Despite the error above, it still mounted the disk Z, which, when I clicked
on it in the File Explorer, asked to be formatted.

Once formatted, I ran the following, as admin this time:
c:\Users\ultred\Desktop>mklink /d folderA Z:
symbolic link created for folderA <<===>> Z:

That created a size-limited ephemeral fast folder on the desktop.
http://i.cubeupload.com/GZHdJy.jpg
Andy Burns
2018-03-06 19:49:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
For the tribal record, here is my personal log file of my one and only test
of Andy Burns' helpful, non-emotional, and on-topic suggested method, which
has a huge advantage in simplicity & speed, at only the cost of
ephemerality.
No need for it to be ephemeral ... as well as using RAM disks (people
are going to run out quickly creating more than 26x DVD sized RAM disks)
it can handle disk based containers, which can be mounted to folders, as
well as drive letters

<Loading Image.../1>

You might need to use some other tool to create the vhd/iso/vmdk or
whatever file(s).
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-06 21:57:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andy Burns
No need for it to be ephemeral ... as well as using RAM disks (people
are going to run out quickly creating more than 26x DVD sized RAM disks)
it can handle disk based containers, which can be mounted to folders, as
well as drive letters
<https://a.fsdn.com/con/app/proj/imdisk-toolkit/screenshots/Capture3.png/1>
You might need to use some other tool to create the vhd/iso/vmdk or
whatever file(s).
Thanks Andy, as the RAM disk suggestion enabled a fast and easy
size-limited folder, but a RAM disk suffers from all the foibles of RAM
itself.

Your post above actually cleared up a confusion I had in my one and only
test of imdisk, which was when I tried to unmount the ram disk Z:, the GUI
asked me if I wanted to create a more permanent "image disk" prior to
unmounting.

Loading Image...

Right clicking on the resulting *.img file mounted the image file as a
disk, which, as you noted, means that permanence is assured!

My only exposure to "img" files is Microsoft Office downloads (where they
seem similar, in concept, to ISO files) - so I guess it's good for everyone
to know whatever you can teach us about using the resulting IMG file.

To keep on track, I copied that IMG file to multiple copies, afterward I
simply right clicking on an IMG file copy which enabled me to mount it
(Mount as ImDisk Virtual Disk), so, that establishes the permanence you
speak of!

In summary, your proposed solution is better than mine in /all/ ways I can
think of.
a. It is simple & fast
b. It is permanent (or leaves no footprint, depending on your needs)
c. It doesn't suffer from encryption (which was a flaw of my method)

Thanks for adding value to the overall knowledge level of the group!
Char Jackson
2018-03-05 09:52:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
The question is extremely common of how to limit folder size on Windows
Given it's a common question [snip]
we all know the question is extremely common of how best to limit
the size of a folder on Windows. [snip]
Googling outside of Usenet for the common question of limiting the size of
a Windows folder [snip]
Given that the question of limiting Windows folder sizes is a common
question [snip]
I'm starting to get the feeling that limiting folder size on Windows is
a common question. At least that's what I'm hearing.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-05 12:14:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Char Jackson
I'm starting to get the feeling that limiting folder size on Windows is
a common question. At least that's what I'm hearing.
Yup. It's a common a question, as witnessed by these results (none of which
portray the simple solution proposed in this thread).

https://epicsearch.in/search?pno=1&q=how+to+limit+folder+size+on+windows
https://bing.com/search?q=how+to+limit+folder+size+on+windows
https://google.com/search?q=how+to+limit+folder+size+on+Windows
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=how+to+limit+folder+size+on+windows

The only unknown at the moment is how to implement Andy Burns' suggestion
of mounting the container file to a folder instead of mounting the
container file to an alphabetical drive letter (and then symlinking to a
folder).
Char Jackson
2018-03-05 16:17:11 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 5 Mar 2018 12:14:54 +0000 (UTC), ultred ragnusen
Post by Char Jackson
I'm starting to get the feeling that limiting folder size on Windows is
a common question. At least that's what I'm hearing.
Yup. It's a common a question [snip]
I guess I forgot the wink. ;-)

BTW, I wouldn't call it a common question. It's not something that most
people want or need to do.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-05 17:08:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Char Jackson
BTW, I wouldn't call it a common question. It's not something that most
people want or need to do.
Well, in my defense, this offshoot is becuase someone complained that the
original post didn't answer a question directly, so the only reason for
bringing up that it's a common question is that it's a common question.

At least it's common enough of a question to have multiple answers, all of
which, IMHO, are pretty involved (if you clicked on any of the search
results).

https://google.com/search?q=how+to+limit+folder+size+on+Windows

Let's not argue whether it's a common enough question to start with the
word "SOLVED" - and get back to solutions to the question - which -
generically - boils down to this desire:

Q: What an easy way to dynamically create size-limited folders on Windows.
A: (I already gave a half dozen methods - one of which is the one I came up
with which uses copies of size-limited encrypted file containers).
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-06 17:16:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Unfortunately, I don't know of Windows 10 or Windows 7 archives on Google
Groups for which to belatedly point to those references for you, where I
can easily find a related question on alt.backup-software
https://tinyurl.com/alt-backup-software
Thanks to Frank Slootweg for adding value, we all now have an answer to
that question posed in the quote above.

Q: What is a good searchable archive for these Windows newsgroups?
* alt.windows7.general
* alt.comp.os.windows-8
* alt.comp.os.windows-10

A: These are searchable archives for those Windows newsgroups:
* https://tinyurl.com/alt-windows7-general
* https://tinyurl.com/alt-comp-os-windows-8
* https://tinyurl.com/alt-comp-os-windows-10

Every question has an answer ... we just have to write it & then find it.
Char Jackson
2018-03-05 09:41:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Back up data by efficiently filling multiple DVDs as individual disks
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/03/04/dvd_sized_dirs.jpg
a. Back up large data to multiple individual non-sequential DVDs
b. As efficiently as possible (i.e., by filling up each of the DVDs)
c. Without needing proprietary stitching software for use in a decade
A. Create one 4,482,269KB encrypted container file (password = spacekey)
B. Copy that DVD-sized container file as many times as you like
C. Mount those container files as Removable Disk Drives using Veracrypt
1. Run Veracrypt (or Truecrypt) & create a 4,482,269KB container file
2. The password (unfortunately) must exist, but it will take 1 character
3. Choose "Large File" if you wish NTFS instead of FAT32 format containers
4. Once you have one empty 4,482,269KB container file, copy it as needed
5. Mount as many of the DVD-sized container files as you think you need
6. Copy as many files as will fit in the container & burn to DVD
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/03/04/dvd_sized_dirs.jpg
NOTE: If you wish to keep the encryption on the resulting DVD, you can
simply unmount the removable disk & burn the filled container file;
otherwise burn the contents of the removable disk to DVD media.
What we don't want, for this method, is any forced connection between the
DVDs, as that makes recovery in a decade problematic. The inherent beauty
of this method is that you never have to /calculate/ or back out data, as
you only put into the container as much as will fit on a single-sided DVD.
Pardon me for quoting 30+ lines of text to ask this question, but I need
it in order to make a point. You stated that one of your objectives was
KISS. When did that objective fly out the window?
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-05 12:31:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Char Jackson
Pardon me for quoting 30+ lines of text to ask this question, but I need
it in order to make a point. You stated that one of your objectives was
KISS. When did that objective fly out the window?
You're just confused. Hence you're not thinking logically.

Whether or not I describe the steps in confusing detail or if I summarize
them succinctly, the solution is still KISS.

In fact, I'm confident it's a hellova-lot more KISS than /any/ of solution
you have ever seen or even thought of (that works).

Q: What's an easy way to create size-limited dynamic folders on Windows?
A: Symlink a mounted container file as a folder on your Windows HDD.

Now that's KISS! :)
Char Jackson
2018-03-05 15:47:47 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 5 Mar 2018 12:31:00 +0000 (UTC), ultred ragnusen
Post by ultred ragnusen
Post by Char Jackson
Pardon me for quoting 30+ lines of text to ask this question, but I need
it in order to make a point. You stated that one of your objectives was
KISS. When did that objective fly out the window?
You're just confused. Hence you're not thinking logically.
Whether or not I describe the steps in confusing detail or if I summarize
them succinctly, the solution is still KISS.
In fact, I'm confident it's a hellova-lot more KISS than /any/ of solution
you have ever seen or even thought of (that works).
Except for the obvious solution that 99.99% of the rest of the crowd
uses: hard drive(s). Now *that's* KISS.

Whether you get to it/them via USB2, USB3, Firewire, eSata, SATA, or
Ethernet, a hard drive still makes the most sense as the target device.
They come in sizes that don't require you to jump through 95% of the
hoops you're jumping through. Your Rube Goldberg solution probably isn't
a valuable solution to most people. It has way too many steps and way
too much complexity for what's already a well-defined task.
Post by ultred ragnusen
Q: What's an easy way to create size-limited dynamic folders on Windows?
I'm not sure why you decided to focus on this one specific aspect of
your much larger project.
Post by ultred ragnusen
A: Symlink a mounted container file as a folder on your Windows HDD.
Now that's KISS! :)
Hardly. I'm surprised you didn't arrive at something like creating 128
partitions (GPT limit under Windows, or arbitrary limit under MBR inside
an extended partition), then mounting them as folders under the root of
your choice. Since they're partitions, they're automatically
size-limited, since that seems to be important to you. Mounting as
folders means no drive-letter limitation, as well. That has fewer steps
than your solution, although it's still too complicated.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-05 17:41:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Char Jackson
Except for the obvious solution that 99.99% of the rest of the crowd
uses: hard drive(s). Now *that's* KISS.
I realize that you feel this HDD hard disc is actually more KISS, but it
has its own inherent problems fitting on the backup DVD spindle and the
problem of writing to that smooth surface where the writing has to last for
archival time periods.

Loading Image...
Post by Char Jackson
Whether you get to it/them via USB2, USB3, Firewire, eSata, SATA, or
Ethernet, a hard drive still makes the most sense as the target device.
Nobody is going to disagree that there are different solutions for
different problem sets.

But, I just tried your method, where I found that a hard drive hard disc is
a terrible way to stack discs on a spindle for archival since you have to
disassemble the hard drive to take the discs out where, admittedly, they
are very shiny and make great non-breakable shaving mirrors if you don't
mind the hole in the center (ask me how I know this).

Loading Image...
Post by Char Jackson
They come in sizes that don't require you to jump through 95% of the
hoops you're jumping through.
Actually, as you can see from this picture, the size of the hard disk disc
is not right for the DVD spindle. I agree with you though that it's pretty
close to the DVD size, but the hole is bigger and the disc diameter is
smaller.

Loading Image...
Post by Char Jackson
Your Rube Goldberg solution probably isn't
a valuable solution to most people. It has way too many steps and way
too much complexity for what's already a well-defined task.
Well, again, in my defense, I'm not going to tell anyone why they might
want size-limited folders on Windows, but we know the question isn't a
unique question.

We only know that all the solutions basically suck.

But I at least gave a really good reason why the size I wanted to limit the
folders to was less than 4.7GB. Do you want me to post another picture of
my DVD backup spindles for you to figure out why? :)
Post by Char Jackson
Post by ultred ragnusen
Q: What's an easy way to create size-limited dynamic folders on Windows?
I'm not sure why you decided to focus on this one specific aspect of
your much larger project.
Ummmm... because I was responding to the questions of what problem the OP
was solving.
Post by Char Jackson
Post by ultred ragnusen
A: Symlink a mounted container file as a folder on your Windows HDD.
Now that's KISS! :)
Hardly. I'm surprised you didn't arrive at something like creating 128
partitions (GPT limit under Windows, or arbitrary limit under MBR inside
an extended partition), then mounting them as folders under the root of
your choice. Since they're partitions, they're automatically
size-limited, since that seems to be important to you. Mounting as
folders means no drive-letter limitation, as well. That has fewer steps
than your solution, although it's still too complicated.
I always said that partitions were an option. I like working with files
more so than with partitions. But I never said partitions were not an
option.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-06 18:22:48 UTC
Permalink
Since they're partitions, they're automatically size-limited,
So as to continue to be responsive to your concerns, and at the same time
to always add a workable solution to every thread for the tribal knowledge
archives, here is one way to implement Char Jackson's proposed solution
that I found in the web-searchable archives just now that Frank Slootweg
pointed us to.

Note: Since this paste if from the web archives, it doesn't contain Andy
Burns' excellent suggestion of using a RAM disk (ImDisk) as the solution!

[BEGIN WEB ARCHIVE PASTE]

There are multiple ways to create DVD-sized mount points:
- Partitions (not easily changed)
- Quotas (too difficult to manage)
- Virtual disks (too difficult to manage)
- 3rd-party software container files (easy to change & easy to manage
Here's the command-line sequence I tried after the graphical method failed.

Run the "diskpart" tool on the Windows 10 command line as Administrator.
C:\WINDOWS\system32> diskpart

Create a virtual disk:
DISKPART> list vdisk (should report that there are none)
DISKPART> create vdisk file=c:\Users\x\Documents\vdisk01.vhd maximum=4300
DISKPART> list vdisk (should now report that vdisk01.vhd)
DISKPART> detail vdisk (should report that it's not attached yet)
DISKPART> attach vdisk
DISKPART> detail vdisk (should report that it's now attached but not open)
DISKPART> create partition primary
DISKPART> format fs=ntfs label="vhd vdisk01" quick
DISKPART> assign letter=z
DISKPART> exit

According to Microsoft, you MUST detach all virtual disks BEFORE shutting
Windows down or the files will be corrupted:
https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg318052(v=ws.10).aspx

C:\WINDOWS\system32> diskpart
DISKPART> select vdisk file="c:\Users\x\Documents\vdisk01.vhd"
DISKPART> detach vdisk
DISKPART> exit

Create a symlinked folder on the users' desktop.
C:\WINDOWS\system32> mklink /d C:\Users\x\Desktop\folder01 z:
C:\WINDOWS\system32> exit
While I had expected this to put a symlink on the users' desktop (as it did
in the case of the VeraCrypt mounted containers), this actually puts a
"shortcut" on the users' desktop named "folder01".

The result is three things (working backward):
1. A shortcut named "folder01" on the users' Desktop.
[Right clicking properties tells you nothing, inexplicably to me.]
2. A drive named "vhd vdisk01 (Z:) in "This PC" "Devices and drives".
[Right clicking properties show size = 4.19 GB (4,508,877,312 bytes)
and Size on disk = 4.19 GB (4,508,880,896 bytes)]
3. A virtual hard disk named "vdisk01.vhd" in the users' Documents folder.
[Right clicking properties show used space = 31,174,656 bytes (29.7MB)
and Free space = 4,475,600,896 bytes (4.16GB) and
Capacity = 4,506,775,552 bytes (4.19GB)]

This method has two nice advantages over the VeraCrypt method.
1. This method uses only Windows components (no extra software), and,
2. This method doesn't have the extra encryption overhead of VeraCrypt.
Dave
2018-03-04 16:22:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Back up data by efficiently filling multiple DVDs as individual disks
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/03/04/dvd_sized_dirs.jpg
a. Back up large data to multiple individual non-sequential DVDs b. As
efficiently as possible (i.e., by filling up each of the DVDs)
c. Without needing proprietary stitching software for use in a decade
A. Create one 4,482,269KB encrypted container file (password = spacekey)
B. Copy that DVD-sized container file as many times as you like C. Mount
those container files as Removable Disk Drives using Veracrypt
1. Run Veracrypt (or Truecrypt) & create a 4,482,269KB container file 2.
The password (unfortunately) must exist, but it will take 1 character 3.
Choose "Large File" if you wish NTFS instead of FAT32 format containers
4. Once you have one empty 4,482,269KB container file, copy it as needed
5. Mount as many of the DVD-sized container files as you think you need
6. Copy as many files as will fit in the container & burn to DVD
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/03/04/dvd_sized_dirs.jpg
NOTE: If you wish to keep the encryption on the resulting DVD, you can
simply unmount the removable disk & burn the filled container file;
otherwise burn the contents of the removable disk to DVD media.
What we don't want, for this method, is any forced connection between
the DVDs, as that makes recovery in a decade problematic. The inherent
beauty of this method is that you never have to /calculate/ or back out
data, as you only put into the container as much as will fit on a
single-sided DVD.
That sounds like a wonderful suggestion. So for all you people using
multiple DVD's to back up your data, you have something you can use.
Personally, I plug my not too expensive external usb drive into a usb
port, and run the backup without interruption.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-05 17:53:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dave
That sounds like a wonderful suggestion. So for all you people using
multiple DVD's to back up your data, you have something you can use.
Personally, I plug my not too expensive external usb drive into a usb
port, and run the backup without interruption.
I never once said that choices aren't a good thing, and I never once said I
don't also have hard disk drives, where, in fact, I just tried your
proposed solution which is similar to that of Char Jackson, and the hard
disk disc doens't fit on the DVD spindle as well as I would like it to.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/03/05/hdd_disc_3.jpg

The fit is close, but the hard disk disc is sort of malformed, like an
avocado is malformed, with the pit too large for the fruit.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/03/05/hdd_disc_2.jpg

In this case, as you can see, the hard disk disc method you propose fits on
the DVD spindle, but the hole in the middle it too big and the diameter too
small for my long-standing well-organized DVD archival method.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/03/05/hdd_disc_1.jpg

Can you suggest how I can make the hard disk disc fit the spindle better?
pjp
2018-03-04 20:33:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Back up data by efficiently filling multiple DVDs as individual disks
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/03/04/dvd_sized_dirs.jpg
a. Back up large data to multiple individual non-sequential DVDs
b. As efficiently as possible (i.e., by filling up each of the DVDs)
c. Without needing proprietary stitching software for use in a decade
A. Create one 4,482,269KB encrypted container file (password = spacekey)
B. Copy that DVD-sized container file as many times as you like
C. Mount those container files as Removable Disk Drives using Veracrypt
1. Run Veracrypt (or Truecrypt) & create a 4,482,269KB container file
2. The password (unfortunately) must exist, but it will take 1 character
3. Choose "Large File" if you wish NTFS instead of FAT32 format containers
4. Once you have one empty 4,482,269KB container file, copy it as needed
5. Mount as many of the DVD-sized container files as you think you need
6. Copy as many files as will fit in the container & burn to DVD
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/03/04/dvd_sized_dirs.jpg
NOTE: If you wish to keep the encryption on the resulting DVD, you can
simply unmount the removable disk & burn the filled container file;
otherwise burn the contents of the removable disk to DVD media.
What we don't want, for this method, is any forced connection between the
DVDs, as that makes recovery in a decade problematic. The inherent beauty
of this method is that you never have to /calculate/ or back out data, as
you only put into the container as much as will fit on a single-sided DVD.
I simply have a folder and copy what I intend to burn into that folder.
When the folder reaches over 4Gb I burn the max amount I can fit onto a
dvd using Nero. I select the inidividual files to max out disk as best
as possible but what's left over just gets burned onto next dvd etc.
I'll often have 3-4 dvds of stuff I burn one after the other using this
method. DVD's then get stored in cases someplace safe.

The little bit of wasted space doesn't amount to enough for me to bother
trying to use a disk to it's maximum. I don't mind a couple 100 Mbs
unused with the cost of disks so cheap, e.g. $0.30. I see it same as
burning a movie dvd. Most movies are approx 2hrs max yet disk holds 3
hrs so always wasted space on movie disks. I do try to put two 1 1/2 hr
movies onto one disk but even then there's always some wasted space.

Yes - same as you. I dislike needing 3rd party software to break apart
larger then 4.5Gb files so you can burn them. I try and keep some dual-
layer disks just for these and have seldom had to resort to any file
splitting software.
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-05 18:10:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by pjp
I simply have a folder and copy what I intend to burn into that folder.
When the folder reaches over 4Gb I burn the max amount I can fit onto a
dvd using Nero. I select the inidividual files to max out disk as best
as possible but what's left over just gets burned onto next dvd etc.
I'll often have 3-4 dvds of stuff I burn one after the other using this
method. DVD's then get stored in cases someplace safe.
Yes. I know. That's exactly what most people do who want to fit as many
files for backup purposes as they can on a DVD. I used your method perhaps
a billion times, so I'm well acquainted with that fill, check, fill some
more, check again, fill more, check, overfill, back it out, check, etc.
method.

We all are.
Post by pjp
The little bit of wasted space doesn't amount to enough for me to bother
trying to use a disk to it's maximum.
The little bit of wasted space isn't at all the issue. In my proposed
method, there's still wasted space that is the same as your method.

The only difference between my method and yours is that I never need to
check the file size. So I skip a few iterations of "is it full yet", that
you have to do manually. To be clear, I've been there and done that a
billion times.

I just think this method is easier, that's all.

It's even easier on Windows 10 than I recall Windows XP (and maybe also
Windows 7 was). In Windows XP, as I recall, if you overfilled a
size-limited folder, it would screw up the last copy like you can't
believe.

As I recall, it would complain, and fail, but only partially fail, such
that you'd have to do a painstaking visual diff to see which files made it
and which ones didn't.

At least in Windows 10, the whole last copy fails, en masse, as it should,
if you can't fit whatever files you selected to fit in the size-limited
container.
Post by pjp
I don't mind a couple 100 Mbs
unused with the cost of disks so cheap, e.g. $0.30.
Again, it's not an issue of the last 100MB of wasted space.
It's an issue of not having to check the folder each time you get close to
filling it up.

The folder will let you know when it's full.
Post by pjp
I see it same as
burning a movie dvd. Most movies are approx 2hrs max yet disk holds 3
hrs so always wasted space on movie disks. I do try to put two 1 1/2 hr
movies onto one disk but even then there's always some wasted space.
I gave up doing that, but I have a billion DVDs of movies, where I used to
store them as MP3 files, and then as authored DVDs with multiple movies in
the menu, and then I simply put one DVD per disc, where I hit the button to
not compress the VIDEO_TS files so much such that they /filled/ the entire
DVD.

So, I'm with you on this experience of movies where I must have burned at
least two or three hundred movie DVDs in my lifetime. (If you want, I can
snap pictures, or you can just believe me.)

BTW, my authoring software of choice is DeVeDe (which works on Linux &
Windows), and DVDFlick (but it's very slow) if I need to do more with the
movie conversion and menu selections.
Post by pjp
Yes - same as you. I dislike needing 3rd party software to break apart
larger then 4.5Gb files so you can burn them. I try and keep some dual-
layer disks just for these and have seldom had to resort to any file
splitting software.
I never could justify the cost of blue ray or double-layer discs, and, in
fact, my main "portable" DVD burner is /still/ a huge Sony burner I bought
when DVDs were brand new, where the thing is the size of a couple of
bricks.

The point is, DVD isn't dead (yet), and DVD makes great archival media if
you don't want to deal with the frailties of hard disc drives (there's a
reason my shaving mirror is a hard disk disc and it's the same reason why
my backpack contains the other hard disk disc for a signal mirror).
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/03/05/hdd_disc_1.jpg
ultred ragnusen
2018-03-06 19:25:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by ultred ragnusen
Back up data by efficiently filling multiple DVDs as individual disks
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/03/04/dvd_sized_dirs.jpg
In summary, for the tribal record, while more than a half dozen methods
were discussed in detail in this thread which will enable any user to
create a size-limited folder on their desktop, the /simplest/ two methods
proposed, IMHO, were:

a. Andy Burns' proposal of linking a ram disk to a size-limited folder:
Loading Image...

b. My proposal of linking a file container to a size-limited folder.
Loading Image...

If you know of a /simpler/ way to create a size-limited folder, please add
value; otherwise, we can consider this topic as having been solved.
Loading...