Discussion:
Adding XP to 2000 PC
(too old to reply)
Newgene McMensa
2018-02-03 03:08:17 UTC
Permalink
I've to this old Win2000 machine that I would like to installed XP. Specs are below. Is there anything here that would prevent XP from running on it?
Also, can XP be installed where there's a menu to switch back to 2000 when booting? I keep this computer before I have a proprietary program that runs on 2000 but not on XP or later versions.
Thanks in advance!
Scott
[System Summary]
OS Name
- Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional
Version
- 5.0.2195 Service Pack 4 Build 2195
System Manufacturer
- AWARD_
System Model
- AWRDACPI
System Type
- X86-based PC
Processor
- x86 Family 6 Model 10 Stepping 0 AuthenticAMD ~1198 Mhz
BIOS Version
- Phoenix - AwardBIOS v6.00PG
Total Physical Memory
- 2,080,240 KB
Available Physical Memory
- 1,443,680 KB
Total Virtual Memory
- 4,539,632 KB
Available Virtual Memory
- 3,237,196 KB
Page File Space
- 2,459,392 KB
It is possible to install Windows XP on a separate partition and you can
run both Windows 2000 and Windows XP in dual boot mode. However, the
problem you are likely to have is that Windows XP requires activation
but Microsoft has shut down its servers for people to activate fresh
install of Windows XP. So after 30 days you will not be able to boot up
Windows XP unless you can activate it which is almost impossible.
People have used cracks but this has its own problems - Malware!! If
you can get hold of Volume Licensed XP (Normally available to
corporates) then you can use XP.
My personal opinion is to get a new machine for $300 from DELL with
Windows 10 pre-installed and you are set for the next 10 years because
you'll get updates and upgrades over that time.
Why did you think of installing XP now when the official support ended
in 2014 and it was around since 2001? Have you just managed to learn
about it now? Go and use Linux as it will run in dual boot with your
Windows 2000. You need to ask Linux users in their Newsgroups to advice
you how this can be done.
Good luck.
Thanks, GG. The reason is that I need to connect to a printer and I have not been able to find a new printer that will work with 2000. Several people gave suggestions of printers, drivers, etc., but none of them have worked for me. The new printers in the stores here generally work with XP.
Why not upgrade to 7, etc? Because this machine is maxed out with 2G memory. Also, I have a laptop with Win 8 on it and can't stand it - nothing but trouble for me. I am not willing to anything about XP on this machine.
Eventually I will install linux and go that route. But right now it's bottom priority to me. Same for this XP project -- I will probably end up buying an old PC with XP already installed - which is my prefered way to go.
About your printer drivers, I suggest ask your question on Windows 7
Newsgroup. There are many people there who are using old printers and
scanners so they are best people to ask.
<alt.windows7.general>
I have never used Windows 2000; I started with Windows XP then moved to
Vista then to */8.1 and now I'm on 10. Also, my home printer is now HP
LaserJet CP 2025; I still have old Epson DX6000 but that is only used
for scanning once in a blue moon when mum wants something to be scanned
for distribution to her friends.
--
With over 600 million devices now running Windows 10, customer
satisfaction is higher than any previous version of windows.
My problem is the opposite from that. I have an old OS and need a printer that will work with 2000. I would love to find an old printer to use with 2000 -- then I would not have to go through the exercise of installing XP or 7.
People have been successful with Universal Printer Drivers. HP
<http://www8.hp.com/us/en/solutions/business-solutions/printingsolutions/upd.html>
and Ricoh
<http://support.ricoh.com/bb/html/dr_ut_e/rc3/model/p_i/p_i.htm> have
got and I guess Epson
<https://files.support.epson.com/docid/cpd4/cpd41354/source/printers/source/printing_software/windows_fy13/tasks/installing_printer_universal.html>
also have one.
Your best bet is to ask people in Windows 7 Newsgroup as there are users
there who are still using old printers.
--
With over 600 million devices now running Windows 10, customer
satisfaction is higher than any previous version of windows.
Thanks, am crossing to alt.windows7.general.
Paul
2018-02-03 07:25:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Newgene McMensa
I've to this old Win2000 machine that I would like to installed XP. Specs are below. Is there anything here that would prevent XP from running on it?
Also, can XP be installed where there's a menu to switch back to 2000 when booting? I keep this computer before I have a proprietary program that runs on 2000 but not on XP or later versions.
Thanks in advance!
Scott
[System Summary]
OS Name
- Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional
Version
- 5.0.2195 Service Pack 4 Build 2195
System Manufacturer
- AWARD_
System Model
- AWRDACPI
System Type
- X86-based PC
Processor
- x86 Family 6 Model 10 Stepping 0 AuthenticAMD ~1198 Mhz
BIOS Version
- Phoenix - AwardBIOS v6.00PG
Total Physical Memory
- 2,080,240 KB
Available Physical Memory
- 1,443,680 KB
Total Virtual Memory
- 4,539,632 KB
Available Virtual Memory
- 3,237,196 KB
Page File Space
- 2,459,392 KB
It is possible to install Windows XP on a separate partition and you can
run both Windows 2000 and Windows XP in dual boot mode. However, the
problem you are likely to have is that Windows XP requires activation
but Microsoft has shut down its servers for people to activate fresh
install of Windows XP. So after 30 days you will not be able to boot up
Windows XP unless you can activate it which is almost impossible.
People have used cracks but this has its own problems - Malware!! If
you can get hold of Volume Licensed XP (Normally available to
corporates) then you can use XP.
My personal opinion is to get a new machine for $300 from DELL with
Windows 10 pre-installed and you are set for the next 10 years because
you'll get updates and upgrades over that time.
Why did you think of installing XP now when the official support ended
in 2014 and it was around since 2001? Have you just managed to learn
about it now? Go and use Linux as it will run in dual boot with your
Windows 2000. You need to ask Linux users in their Newsgroups to advice
you how this can be done.
Good luck.
Thanks, GG. The reason is that I need to connect to a printer and I have not been able to find a new printer that will work with 2000. Several people gave suggestions of printers, drivers, etc., but none of them have worked for me. The new printers in the stores here generally work with XP.
Why not upgrade to 7, etc? Because this machine is maxed out with 2G memory. Also, I have a laptop with Win 8 on it and can't stand it - nothing but trouble for me. I am not willing to anything about XP on this machine.
Eventually I will install linux and go that route. But right now it's bottom priority to me. Same for this XP project -- I will probably end up buying an old PC with XP already installed - which is my prefered way to go.
About your printer drivers, I suggest ask your question on Windows 7
Newsgroup. There are many people there who are using old printers and
scanners so they are best people to ask.
<alt.windows7.general>
I have never used Windows 2000; I started with Windows XP then moved to
Vista then to */8.1 and now I'm on 10. Also, my home printer is now HP
LaserJet CP 2025; I still have old Epson DX6000 but that is only used
for scanning once in a blue moon when mum wants something to be scanned
for distribution to her friends.
--
With over 600 million devices now running Windows 10, customer
satisfaction is higher than any previous version of windows.
My problem is the opposite from that. I have an old OS and need a printer that will work with 2000. I would love to find an old printer to use with 2000 -- then I would not have to go through the exercise of installing XP or 7.
People have been successful with Universal Printer Drivers. HP
<http://www8.hp.com/us/en/solutions/business-solutions/printingsolutions/upd.html>
and Ricoh
<http://support.ricoh.com/bb/html/dr_ut_e/rc3/model/p_i/p_i.htm> have
got and I guess Epson
<https://files.support.epson.com/docid/cpd4/cpd41354/source/printers/source/printing_software/windows_fy13/tasks/installing_printer_universal.html>
also have one.
Your best bet is to ask people in Windows 7 Newsgroup as there are users
there who are still using old printers.
--
With over 600 million devices now running Windows 10, customer
satisfaction is higher than any previous version of windows.
Thanks, am crossing to alt.windows7.general.
Apparently the Universal Print Driver shipped with Win2K support,
and didn't skip it entirely. It'll be an archeology project though,
with no guarantees. I expect some print subsystems ($$$) will work
out better for this than others, due to the differences between
PCL and Postscript, and whatever inkjets use.

https://msfn.org/board/topic/171402-hp-laserjet-printers-support-in-windows-2000-hp-upd-472/

"Use HP Universal Printing Driver 4.7 (PCL5, PCL6 or PS) that supports Windows 2000.
This driver supports some models internally "listed" inside this driver, however
it is possible add newer driver as "generic" HP PCL or PS printer.

HPUPD47PCL532.exe
HPUPD47PCL632.exe
HPUPD47PS32.exe

<additional info snipped>
"

That was on the first page of search results for:

printer that works with windows 2000

I've also used a driver like that for it's "Print To PostScript"
capability, for the times before Print To PDF became available
by other means. And fed the file into an old copy of Distiller.

HTH,
Paul
Newgene McMensa
2018-06-15 01:44:33 UTC
Permalink
This computer using Win2000 on it -- I have to keep it for running one proprietary program. But it's limited with the OS for normal tasks.

I just picked up "new" OEM versions of XP and 7, that would like to load on the same computer, so that I can boot to any one of them without screwing up the other two.

Any pointers on where to look or super E-Z advice to follow?


Thanks in advance
Mayayana
2018-06-15 02:16:04 UTC
Permalink
"Newgene McMensa" <newgene.mcmensaREMOVEREMOVEgmail.com> wrote

----
Answered in Win8 group. Please don't multi-post.
Paul
2018-06-15 03:33:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Newgene McMensa
This computer using Win2000 on it -- I have to keep it for running one proprietary program. But it's limited with the OS for normal tasks.
I just picked up "new" OEM versions of XP and 7, that would like to load on the same computer, so that I can boot to any one of them without screwing up the other two.
Any pointers on where to look or super E-Z advice to follow?
Thanks in advance
1) Backup C: system drive with Win2K to an external disk.
If you make a meesteak, you can start over.

2) Using disk management, define an NTFS partition of a size
you're happy with. NTFS for WinXP is intended to help keep
it (slightly) more secure.

If you use FAT32 for WinXP, you'll need the RidgeCrop FAT32formatter
to handle partitions larger than 32GB.

If you set a "label" on the new partition, such as "WINXP",
the stupid installer will probably reformat the partition
which wipes the label. Using intelligent labels for the partitions
might have to wait for later.

3) Boot the WinXP disc, and install WinXP.
WinXP will modify boot.ini to suit both OSes.

4) In WinXP, define another NTFS partition for
your Win7. That will be the main partition.
Like the other NTFS partition, use default cluster
size (which is 4KB). NTFS is the only choice for Win7.

Note that Windows 7 installer DVD, given't its own
choice, will use megabyte alignment for partitions.
If you define a partition using the running WinXP
OS, that will be MBR aligned.

As to what alignment to prefer, that depends on the
disk. Disks come in 512n (native, the best kind),
512e (better if these are aligned properly), and
4Kn (*don't* buy those, there aren't tools for
interworking with them). Since you've already installed
Win2K, it would be "messy" to do something else now
anyway. Making the Win7 partition from WinXP, will
keep most of the disk "consistent" in design.

5) You can point the Win7 installer at the empty
partition in question, but it can also insist
on adding a smaller System Reserved partition.
If memory serves, pointing the installer right at
the empty C: might result in a more compact install,
without the System Reserved partition. The purpose of
SR is to support BitLocker whole disk encryption, and
having a separate SR isn't really necessary for most people.

Windows 7 keeps boot menu details in the BCD binary
file. Boot menu details later (the three OSes) will
be displayed by running "bcdedit" command from an
Administrator Command Prompt window in the freshly
installed Windows 7.

6) Depending on what kind of a rough ride you're given,
the disk looks like this. Windows 7 runs the show.
Notice this takes four partitions. Notice I can't use
GPT partitioning, because the other OSes don't comprehend it.
Only Win7 would understand GPT. Windows installer discs
will also install with Extended+Logical partitions.
I *hate* this, because of the problems later if I
wanted to delete Win2K and WinXP and then run with
just Win7. The purpose of making the three partitions
on the left Primary partitions, is to simplify maintenance
later. (The MBR is a single sector, is not a partition,
and is drawn this way to signify legacy MSDOS partitioning.
it's where the partition table lives...)

Primary1 Primary2 Primary3 Primary4?
+-----+----------+----------+----------+-----------------+
| MBR | Win2K | WinXP | Win7 C: | System Reserved |
+-----+----------+----------+----------+-----------------+
Boot System,Active


If you have a DATA partition, either combine the DATA
into your Win2K install before starting, or transfer to
another disk.

If by using the custom option, pointing it to the empty
NTFS you convince it to not create System Reserved, then
the setup looks like this.

+-----+----------+----------+----------------------------+
| MBR | Win2K | WinXP | Win7 C: |
+-----+----------+----------+----------------------------+
System,Active,Boot

And in that case, there's room for a fourth partition
containing, say, a DATA partition.

Say, for example, I led a blessed life, I prepared empty
partitions in advanced, I used the custom button and told
the installer to use just the partition I provided, your
setup *might* look like this.

+-----+----------+----------+----------+------------------+
| MBR | Win2K | DATA | WinXP | Win7 C: |
+-----+----------+----------+----------+------------------+
System,Active,Boot

It's not hard to do this stuff, but it might take
more than one try to get it "just right". That's why
we make backups, so there's a fallback option.

I usually save activation for later, when the layout
looks good. Note that WinXP will give you merry hell,
as the wiring isn't so good any more. To activate
WinXP, you might have to install IE8.

IE8-WindowsXP-x86-ENU.exe 16,883,056 bytes

http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=261544

To bring your IE8 WinXP up to date, try this Cumulative.

https://download.microsoft.com/download/1/D/4/1D494784-7A1F-42E3-9B9F-BC9E36317346/IE8-WindowsXP-KB4018271-x86-Custom-ENU.exe

And if you actually expect WinXP Windows Update to work,
well... I don't want any sad faces. It's hard work
making this shit function. That's another entire post.
I have a VM flailing on this machine right now,
not behaving properly, so nothing has changed much
when it comes to Windows Update. Just perfect your
install skillz for now. The real work comes later.

Have fun,
Paul

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