Discussion:
Glary Utilities ?
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scbs29
2018-02-27 20:22:22 UTC
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Hi
Has anyone any experience with using Glary Utiloities on Win 7 64-bit
?
Any pros or cons ?
TIA
--
remove fred before emailing
Good Guy
2018-02-27 21:41:28 UTC
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Post by scbs29
Hi
Has anyone any experience with using Glary Utiloities on Win 7 64-bit
?
Any pros or cons ?
TIA
Pros only. Any malware you install is always a good thing. So go ahead
and use it until you scream.
--
With over 600 million devices now running Windows 10, customer
satisfaction is higher than any previous version of windows.
VanguardLH
2018-02-27 22:23:08 UTC
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Has anyone any experience with using Glary Utiloities on Win 7 64-bit?
Any pros or cons?
This, like many other suites that bundle in many utilities, provides
less than stellar individual tools. You would be better off getting the
tools you want and getting better quality ones. Glary doesn't even
provide a list of the functions or tools they roll into their bundle.
At the bottom of the page, they separately list their free tools which
I'm guessing is what they roll into their bundled suite. Those are:

- Registry Repair
Usually snake oil. Only rare will it help, like delete shell handlers
that have been uninstalled but were dirty and left behind handlers
defined in the registry.
Alternative: Piriform CCleaner. It is a safe cleaner rather than more
aggressive cleaners that can result in corrupting
behavior of apps of the OS.

- Tracks Eraser
Alternative: Piriform CCleaner.

- Duplicate Cleaner
Alternative: Piriform CCleaner. Lots of these tool types. Ask in the
alt.comp.freeware newsgroup for recommendations.

- Disk Cleaner
Alternative: Use the disk cleanup wizard that comes in Windows. Add
CCleaner if a more thorough cleanup is wanted, especially
if you want to include your own list of folders.

- Disk Speedup
Alternative: Use the disk defragmenter that comes in Windows, or use a
3rd party tool (e.g., Piriform Defraggler). DO NOT USE
MORE THAN ONE DEFRAGMENTER! Each has their own scheme
for how they think is the best layout on the drive and
will undo the scheme done by the other.
- Undelete
Alternative: Piriform Recuva.

- Absolute Uninstaller
Alternative: Revo Uninstaller. The free version added 64-bit Windows
support a while ago.

- Quick Startup
Alternative: Use msconfig.exe that comes in Windows. Add SysInternals
AutoRuns to manage *all* startup locations, which also
integrates with VirusTotal.com (50+ AV scan engines) to
detect malicious startup programs.

- Software Update
Alternative: Secunia Software Inspector (SPI). Some anti-virus
programs (e.g., Avast) include a software updater. Just
because there is a new update does not mean you want it:
new code = new bugs & new vulnerabilities. Plan when to
perform updates on the OS and apps, do an image backup,
then do the updates. If you plan for when to check for
and install updates, these programs are nuisanceware.

- Quick Search
Alternative: Search Everything (by filename only), FileLocator Pro (if
to search by filename and/or content). I use both.

- Disk Explorer
There are tons of file manager replacements. Ask in the
alt.comp.freeware newsgroup on recommendations.

- Security Process Explorer
Alternative: SysInternals Process Explorer. Can even intregate with
VirusTotal.com (uses 50+ AV scan engines) to detect
malicious processes. Lots of info about a process.
Handy tool to determine which process owns (has a handle
to) a window.
Stan Brown
2018-03-01 23:26:51 UTC
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Post by VanguardLH
- Registry Repair
Usually snake oil. Only rare will it help, like delete shell handlers
that have been uninstalled but were dirty and left behind handlers
defined in the registry.
I agree with "usually snake oil".

Something I've never tested is whether any of these cleaners will
remove outdated entries in the COM Type Library for old versions of
Microsoft Office. It's a known problem in 2013 and 2016, maybe 2010
too, but I can't remember, that when you uninstall the old version
and install the new version, some registry entries can be left behind
pointing to the no-longer-installed software. Then add-in software
can crash because it uses those "road to nowhere" registry entries.
--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://BrownMath.com/
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
Shikata ga nai...
Paul
2018-02-27 22:37:42 UTC
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Post by scbs29
Hi
Has anyone any experience with using Glary Utiloities on Win 7 64-bit
?
Any pros or cons ?
TIA
Registry Cleaner ?

Did someone say Registry Cleaner ?

*******

This review is written by a Registry Cleaner company. They make
jv16 powertools.

"In-Depth Review of 31 Most Popular Registry Cleaner Products
These tests were performed in April 2009"

https://www.macecraft.com/registry_cleaner_comparison2/

Glary Utilities Pro 2.10.0.622 4.8MB 14.7MB $39.95 System utility suite

Glary Utilities Pro No No Yes Yes 30 day trial, nag screen when starting

The test registry they used, had 1000 actual flaws as well
as 1000 registry entries that should not be fixed because
nothing is wrong with them. Glary found 1335 out of 1000.

Glary Utilities Pro 1335 Many* Many* 22 Sec.

Registry error fixing comparison - the registry settings that
handle .bat launch were damaged on purpose. Could Glary fix it ?

Glary Utilities Pro No No

Removal later.

Glary Utilities Pro Yes No Bad, leaves most (if not all) registry entries behind

In addition to aggressive utilities, there are ones
that just compact the registry. For some reason, their
estimates of compaction vary widely.

https://www.raymond.cc/blog/one-click-windows-registry-optimizer/

Paul
VanguardLH
2018-02-28 03:35:07 UTC
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Post by Paul
Post by scbs29
Hi
Has anyone any experience with using Glary Utiloities on Win 7 64-bit
?
Any pros or cons ?
TIA
Registry Cleaner ?
Did someone say Registry Cleaner ?
*******
This review is written by a Registry Cleaner company. They make
jv16 powertools.
"In-Depth Review of 31 Most Popular Registry Cleaner Products
These tests were performed in April 2009"
https://www.macecraft.com/registry_cleaner_comparison2/
Glary Utilities Pro 2.10.0.622 4.8MB 14.7MB $39.95 System utility suite
Glary Utilities Pro No No Yes Yes 30 day trial, nag screen when starting
The test registry they used, had 1000 actual flaws as well
as 1000 registry entries that should not be fixed because
nothing is wrong with them. Glary found 1335 out of 1000.
Glary Utilities Pro 1335 Many* Many* 22 Sec.
Registry error fixing comparison - the registry settings that
handle .bat launch were damaged on purpose. Could Glary fix it ?
Glary Utilities Pro No No
Removal later.
Glary Utilities Pro Yes No Bad, leaves most (if not all) registry entries behind
In addition to aggressive utilities, there are ones
that just compact the registry. For some reason, their
estimates of compaction vary widely.
https://www.raymond.cc/blog/one-click-windows-registry-optimizer/
Paul
Registry compaction is worthless. That is no different than disk
fragmenters (that will defrag the registry .dat files on the next boot
of Windows). When Windows loads, the registry files are copied into
system memory (RAM). All registry API calls are against the memory
copy. RAM = Random Access Memory. Any part is just as fast to access
as any other part, so it doesn't matter if the binary registry database
is in contiguous memory blocks. All compaction (file defrag) will do is
slightly shorten the Windows load time by about 17 ms to read contiguous
clusters on the drive to copy the registry into the memory; however,
since Windows startup does many things in parallel, there is no
separately distinguishable speed gain from compacting the registry's
files on the disk.

Registry cleaners should only be used by those adept at manually editing
the registry. After all, a registry cleaner is only used as a handy
method to do what the user will do in the registry. Faster doesn't
obviate the user's responsibility as the admin to make the decisions.
scbs29
2018-02-28 10:33:40 UTC
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Thanks for all of the replies.
I will not bother with it.
I had a suspicion that the consensus would be similar to the replies,
and my suspicions seem to have been confirmed.
Post by scbs29
Hi
Has anyone any experience with using Glary Utiloities on Win 7 64-bit
?
Any pros or cons ?
TIA
--
remove fred before emailing
tesla sTinker
2018-03-01 21:44:57 UTC
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if its a bundle, it may be to hard for you to figure download and use.

We like simple stuff so that its quick to download,
and does not eat your resources. And does the job.

http://www.novirusthanks.org/
Post by scbs29
Thanks for all of the replies.
I will not bother with it.
I had a suspicion that the consensus would be similar to the replies,
and my suspicions seem to have been confirmed.
Post by scbs29
Hi
Has anyone any experience with using Glary Utiloities on Win 7 64-bit
?
Any pros or cons ?
TIA
Mathedman
2018-02-28 14:01:16 UTC
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Post by scbs29
Hi
Has anyone any experience with using Glary Utiloities on Win 7 64-bit
?
Any pros or cons ?
TIA
EXCELLENT --especially it's ability to clean the computer of malware,
junk etc (it does leave "cookies" alone however). It also cleans any
junk from the registry
Char Jackson
2018-03-01 02:08:27 UTC
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Post by Mathedman
Post by scbs29
Hi
Has anyone any experience with using Glary Utiloities on Win 7 64-bit
?
Any pros or cons ?
TIA
EXCELLENT --especially it's ability to clean the computer of malware,
junk etc (it does leave "cookies" alone however). It also cleans any
junk from the registry
I agree with all of the *other* replies in this thread: it's garbage,
avoid it.
--
Char Jackson
Ken Blake
2018-03-01 16:44:40 UTC
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Post by Char Jackson
Post by Mathedman
Post by scbs29
Hi
Has anyone any experience with using Glary Utiloities on Win 7 64-bit
?
Any pros or cons ?
TIA
EXCELLENT --especially it's ability to clean the computer of malware,
junk etc (it does leave "cookies" alone however). It also cleans any
junk from the registry
I agree with all of the *other* replies in this thread: it's garbage,
avoid it.
Another vote that it, and all similar utilities, is garbage. All such
utilities are very dangerous.
Bob_S
2018-03-02 02:45:04 UTC
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Post by scbs29
Hi
Has anyone any experience with using Glary Utiloities on Win 7 64-bit
?
Any pros or cons ?
TIA
Looks like you have your answer but to open your mind a bit, Glary Utilities
is more than a registry cleaner and I won't argue the merits of either it's
other utilities usefulness or whether cleaning a registry actually helps.
But consider that on system with limited storage - say 32GB of eMMC, saving
a MB or two by cleaning the registry out can make a difference in performing
an update or maybe adding some software you want. Note - I said nothing
about registry cleaning increasing performance.

Tools like this and most others are simply aggregators of useful tool-sets
that are part of Windows. What a lot of these utilities do is offer an easy
to use interface that then allows you to access some feature or modifier
that you want to use but don't know the secret handshake to get there.

Ever hear of God Mode...? Make a new folder and name it
GodMode.{ED7BA470-8E54-465E-825C-99712043E01C}

The GodeMode part can be named anything you want but it must be followed by
the period and then the string {ED7BA470-8E54-465E-825C-99712043E01C}

There are other special folders which can be accessed as explained here:
https://www.pcworld.com/article/220753/windows_7_god_mode_tips_tricks_tweaks.html

Just do a search on GodMode and you will find plenty of other references.

As for Glary Utilities, I have it and I find that it's an easy tool to grab
when I want to do something quickly - but no, I would not recommend it to
others.
--
Bob S.
Stan Brown
2018-03-03 13:55:01 UTC
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Post by Bob_S
But consider that on system with limited storage - say 32GB of eMMC, saving
a MB or two by cleaning the registry out can make a difference in performing
an update or maybe adding some software you want.
I can't imagine how that can be true.

For one thing, there's virtual memory. For another, a 1 MB increment
in real memory of 32 GB is 0.003%.
--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://BrownMath.com/
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
Shikata ga nai...
VanguardLH
2018-03-03 15:00:07 UTC
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Post by Stan Brown
Post by Bob_S
But consider that on system with limited storage - say 32GB of eMMC, saving
a MB or two by cleaning the registry out can make a difference in performing
an update or maybe adding some software you want.
I can't imagine how that can be true.
For one thing, there's virtual memory. For another, a 1 MB increment
in real memory of 32 GB is 0.003%.
Maybe he meant that there was a maximum aggregate file size for all the
.dat files that comprise the registry, like the total or maximum size of
the registry had some upper bound.

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc963194.aspx

In my Windows 7, RegistrySizeLimit = undefined and PagedPoolSize = 0. I
have not changed these settings so they are the defaults. According to
the above article:

If the values of both RegistrySizeLimit and PagedPoolSize are 0x0, the
system calculates an optimal value for both entries. Typically, the
system sets the value of PagedPoolSize approximately equal to the
amount of physical memory on the computer, and it sets the value of
RegistrySizeLimit to approximately 33 percent of the value of
PagedPoolSize.

For Bob's 32GB setup, that means the maximum aggregate size for all
files that comprise the registry is 11GB. WOW! That's huge. That does
not include any slack space by the files within the file system, only
the allocated space within each file to hold the data (what actually
gets copied into memory).

There are some horror stories about installers that stored huge-sized
data blocks within the registry. One example was for a mouse "driver"
that stored its 32MB .pdf help file as a data item's value in the
registry. Some installers (and programmers) are very sloppy or don't
care about how they consume registry space. A user noted how to use
Nirsoft's RegScanner to find huge-size registry entries; see
https://superuser.com/a/1268082.

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms724881(v=vs.85).aspx
Generally, data consisting of more than one or two kilobytes (K)
should be stored as a file and referred to by using a key in the
registry rather than being stored as a value. Instead of duplicating
large pieces of data in the registry, an application should save the
data as a file and refer to the file. Executable binary code should
never be stored in the registry.

That article states, "The maximum size of a registry hive is 2 GB,
except for the system hive." There are only 2 real registry hives:
HKEY_USERS and HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE. The others are pseudo-hives: they
are composites of subsections of the 2 real hives and as such consume no
more file space or memory (i.e., they are just different views into the
real hives but they are addressable separately via registry API calls).

There are some tools and Powershell scripts to get the current registry
size, or you could export it to see the size of the export file (its
size, not its size on disk which would include slack space in the file
system). Alternatively, you could check the sizes of the registry's
.dat files: %userprofile%\ntuser.dat (user's registry hive) and the
DEFAULT, SAM, SECURITY, SOFTWARE, and SYSTEM files for the system hive
(under %windir%\system32\config). For me with a 4-year old Windows
setup with 8GB system RAM, the user hive file is 7MB and the system hive
files are 120MB, so 127MB total. That's 1.5% of of RAM for the registry
for its memory copy when the files get loaded into memory. For Bob with
his 32GB RAM setup, my registry size would be 0.38% of system RAM.

I just did a check of exporting the entire registry (go into
regedit.exe, select the root "Computer" node in the tree, and export all
of it) and the .reg file size was 323MB. Why the discrepency between
adding the file sizes for the user .dat and system .dat files? Because
the exported .reg file is a text file, not a binay database file. That
means a lot of wasted space to represent the keys and data items as text
instead of binary data within records in a database. Exporting the
registry to create a text file is not a good measure of the current
registry's size. Add up the user (ntuser.dat) and system files noted
above to get their aggregate file size.

The registry's files are loaded into system RAM and the registry API
calls access the memory copy. The registry is NEVER loaded into virtual
memory (which is the pagefile.sys disk file) because of the paging that
would restrict access to some parts of the registry and severely slow
down its access coming off of slow disk media (even for an SSD).
Bob_S
2018-03-03 20:08:52 UTC
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Post by Stan Brown
Post by Bob_S
But consider that on system with limited storage - say 32GB of eMMC, saving
a MB or two by cleaning the registry out can make a difference in performing
an update or maybe adding some software you want.
I can't imagine how that can be true.
For one thing, there's virtual memory. For another, a 1 MB increment
in real memory of 32 GB is 0.003%.
Stan,

Typo on the 32GB, should be 32MB.
Didn't mean to cause a math wiz a bad hair day....
--
Bob S.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-03-03 20:31:50 UTC
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Post by Bob_S
Post by Stan Brown
Post by Bob_S
But consider that on system with limited storage - say 32GB of eMMC, saving
a MB or two by cleaning the registry out can make a difference in performing
an update or maybe adding some software you want.
I can't imagine how that can be true.
For one thing, there's virtual memory. For another, a 1 MB increment
in real memory of 32 GB is 0.003%.
Stan,
Typo on the 32GB, should be 32MB.
Didn't mean to cause a math wiz a bad hair day....
I think you'll find you were right first time - these netbook-type
machines do tend to have 32 GB of eMMC. (Not 32 MB!)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

[What's your guilty pleasure?] Why should you feel guilty about pleasure? -
Michel Roux Jr in Radio Times 2-8 February 2013
Bob_S
2018-03-04 01:02:02 UTC
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Post by Bob_S
Post by Stan Brown
Post by Bob_S
But consider that on system with limited storage - say 32GB of eMMC, saving
a MB or two by cleaning the registry out can make a difference in performing
an update or maybe adding some software you want.
I can't imagine how that can be true.
For one thing, there's virtual memory. For another, a 1 MB increment
in real memory of 32 GB is 0.003%.
Stan,
Typo on the 32GB, should be 32MB.
Didn't mean to cause a math wiz a bad hair day....
I think you'll find you were right first time - these netbook-type machines
do tend to have 32 GB of eMMC. (Not 32 MB!)
John,

You're right. It is 32GB of storage - no matter what the math wiz
thinks....;-) He must have been thinking that cleaning the registry would
only be saving space in RAM and not on the storage media. It does.

Again, I'm sitting here working on setting up 5 new Asus ZenPad's for a
client and playing in the sandbox at the same time. Hey - gotta do
something while they all get updated. It's like watching grass grow.

But to expand on my initial comment. I just recently updated an Acer tablet
and it needed a few more megabytes to get to the magic 4GB it needed to
perform the update and CCleaner came to the rescue as well as moving some
files to temporary storage.

No matter what I post here, there will always be someone fact checking me.
And that’s good! Keeps me on my toes.
--
Bob S.
Stan Brown
2018-03-04 02:44:33 UTC
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Post by Bob_S
Post by Stan Brown
Post by Bob_S
But consider that on system with limited storage - say 32GB of eMMC, saving
a MB or two by cleaning the registry out can make a difference in performing
an update or maybe adding some software you want.
I can't imagine how that can be true.
For one thing, there's virtual memory. For another, a 1 MB increment
in real memory of 32 GB is 0.003%.
Stan,
Typo on the 32GB, should be 32MB.
Didn't mean to cause a math wiz a bad hair day....
If you have a Windows computer computer with 32 MB of RAM, you have
much, much bigger problems.
--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://BrownMath.com/
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
Shikata ga nai...
Bob_S
2018-03-04 04:09:08 UTC
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Post by Stan Brown
Post by Bob_S
Post by Stan Brown
Post by Bob_S
But consider that on system with limited storage - say 32GB of eMMC, saving
a MB or two by cleaning the registry out can make a difference in performing
an update or maybe adding some software you want.
I can't imagine how that can be true.
For one thing, there's virtual memory. For another, a 1 MB increment
in real memory of 32 GB is 0.003%.
Stan,
Typo on the 32GB, should be 32MB.
Didn't mean to cause a math wiz a bad hair day....
If you have a Windows computer computer with 32 MB of RAM, you have
much, much bigger problems.
Great observation....

Thank you
--
Bob S.
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