Discussion:
telnet to win7
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Will Renkel
2018-03-08 17:51:41 UTC
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I have 2 windows 7 puters. I would like to telnet and ftp
between them. I can login to each other but cant get a usable
shell - ksh is choice. I can start it but it does not stay up -
executes the login stuff like .bashrc and ,profile, but then
exits. I am looking for a setup similar to what you get when you
telnet to a unix system. Any ides? All help appreciated.
--
---------------------------------------------------------------
Will Renkel
Wheaton, Ill.

---------------------------------------------------------------
Paul
2018-03-08 18:47:16 UTC
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Post by Will Renkel
I have 2 windows 7 puters. I would like to telnet and ftp
between them. I can login to each other but cant get a usable
shell - ksh is choice. I can start it but it does not stay up -
executes the login stuff like .bashrc and ,profile, but then
exits. I am looking for a setup similar to what you get when you
telnet to a unix system. Any ides? All help appreciated.
The client is a little easier to deal with.

https://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/38433.windows-10-enabling-telnet-client.aspx

The server side (telnetd) is not. While this subsystem existed
in the Win2K era, it probably isn't around today (Windows Services for UNIX???).

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb463201.aspx

Interix Telnetd

Login shell:

All users login to the Interix shell /bin/ksh.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_Services_for_UNIX

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/previous-versions/windows/it-pro/windows-server-2008-R2-and-2008/cc771470(v=ws.11)

Unbelievably, the download still works. I thought for
sure this idea was dead. Now, you'll have to find out
whether they included a telnetd, or whether the package
is mainly candy floss.

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=2391

OK, I saw an "in.telnetd" in there. Which means you can test it.

Back up your C: first, test out the kit. If not
happy, restore from backup.

The inetd server should dispatch in.telnetd when
a telnet program comes calling. This is Unix stuff
from like, 30 years ago. Even your average Linux
distro doesn't offer this now, because everything
(your username and password) all travel in plaintext.
This protocol should not be port forwarded through
your router. You should not telnet into the Windows
machine from Starbucks, for best security. Everyone in
Starbucks will know your password if you do that :-/
(Never assume a public Wifi is immune to scraping.)
Anything you do in public, should use good crypto.
Stelnet, sshd, openssh or whatever. Don't expect to find
good crypto support, in those packages Microsoft
has kindly provided for historical reasons.

Finding the client side, is always going to be easy.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PuTTY

It's the server bits that aren't going to be quite
as easy. Especially modern server bits with the
necessary crypto. So while PuTTY may have some
support for more secure login, there might not
be a server side piece for Windows to go with it.
You might be able to go from Windows PuTTY to
Linux ssh of some sort.

Paul
tesla sTinker
2018-03-17 08:18:58 UTC
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this is not so well. Today you have bluetooth.
if you have two usb ports then you can bluetooth them.
On ebay, get two bluetooth usb chips and the disc. Then install them
on both machines with the software. Then you just radio between the two
computers, and you dont need to be online to do any of it....
And, you can mp3 later to any of the dam devices that are for sale.
The CSR 4.0 is cheap on ebay, about 2$ Windows has a telnet program
in its folder. But as I said, why use it. The way above is much nicer
and easier to use without a connection.
Post by Will Renkel
I have 2 windows 7 puters. I would like to telnet and ftp
between them. I can login to each other but cant get a usable
shell - ksh is choice. I can start it but it does not stay up -
executes the login stuff like .bashrc and ,profile, but then
exits. I am looking for a setup similar to what you get when you
telnet to a unix system. Any ides? All help appreciated.
Java Jive
2018-03-17 13:23:59 UTC
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It might be better if you told us what you are trying to accomplish ...
Post by Will Renkel
I have 2 windows 7 puters. I would like to telnet
Telnet specifically? Telnet is an insecure easily intercepted means of
communication, because it travels unencrypted. For this reason, as
others have said, by default in W7+, may actually be Vista+, the service
required for the remote end of the communication path is not installed,
and you'd have to find out how to install it. Even on 2k/XP, the
service, though installed, is disabled by default.

It's not what you are asking, but for communication with my Linux boxes
from W7, almost exclusively I use Putty + ssl. Even on my own home
cabled network, I only use telnet briefly in emergencies when it's the
only thing that will work.

Depending on what you want to do, probably you'd do better to use the
means of communications that Windows provides, which are Remote
Assistance and Remote Desktop, see ...
Control Panel, System, Advanced system settings, Remote
... though I ought to say these are one of the first things I disable on
any new W7 installation!

Again, why do you need this sort of terminal-based communication? If
you'd explain that, we might be able to suggest better alternatives for
accomplishing what you want.
Post by Will Renkel
and ftp
between them.
Again FTP is insecure because it's sent unencrypted. At least use SFTP,
but why not use Windows sharing which is based on Server Message Block
(SMB often referred to as Samba), which is secure, as long as you set it
up properly.

Here is an extended quote from a post of mine to an old thread which
explains how to set up Windows sharing securely:

Quote:

IMO, M$'s default sharing arrangements have always been insecure, as
perhaps you are realising. What follows is the comparatively secure
way that I've always set up sharing, ever since Windows 2000.

Note: These are W7 instructions only, other versions of Windows will
obviously be similar but not exactly the same, because of M$'
pointless and idiotic habit of hiding all the control levers in
different places with every new edition of Windows, thus forcing
people continually to relearn everything they've known for years. (Can
you imagine the catastrophic chaos that would result on the roads if
car manufacturers decided to do that?).

In what follows, I assume that you want to create shares on each PC
visible to others, and that none are work PCs signing on to a domain
server.

On each PC:

1) Go into ...
Control Panel, All Control Panel Items, System,
Advanced system settings, Computer Name, Change
... and ensure that name and workgroup are changed to something
memorable from the defaults, and that the former is unique, and the
latter is the same for all the machines that you wish to share files
together. If you make changes here, before trying out the sharing you
will need to reboot at some point so that the system can pick up the
changes, but it needn't be done immediately.

2) Any user wishing to access a share on a PC must have a user
account on that PC, so set up the necessary accounts up on each PC,
giving them the same logon user id and passwd as they normally use on
their own PC. (If on a particular PC you want a user only to be able
to access a share, but not be able to sign on to it, you still need
his/her account to exist, but then it must be added to a block list in
that PC's security policy - however, this may not be possible on
some lower cost editions of Windows, and is beyond the scope of these
notes). To add user accounts, go into Control Panel, User Accounts, or
else <rt-click> My Computer and select Manage, and then Local Users and
Groups, Users.

3) Go into ...
Control Panel, All Control Panel Items,
Network and Sharing Center, Advanced sharing settings
... and set the following:
Network discovery
Probably on, unless reason otherwise;
File and printer sharing
Probably on, unless reason otherwise;
Public folder sharing
Probably off, unless reason otherwise;
Media streaming
Probably off, unless reason otherwise;
File sharing connections
Use 128-bit, unless reason otherwise;
Password protected sharing
Turn on;
HomeGroup connections
Select 'Use user accounts and passwords'.

4) On each directory or drive of each machine that you want to
share...
<rt-click>, then choose
Share with, Advanced sharing, Advanced sharing;
Select Share this folder;
Type a suitable share name
(note that ending it with a '$' will hide it
from users casually browsing from other PCs);
Type a suitable comment, if required;
Click Permissions, remove the relatively insecure
default permissions offered, and then click ...
Add, Advanced, Find Now
... and by <click>ing and <ctrl-click>ing select and add
the following:
Admininstrators
System
Authenticated Users
... and then give them the following permissions ...
Admininstrators Full Control
System Full Control
Authenticated Users Read or Read/Change as
required

5) If necessary, but DO NOT DO THE FOLLOWING ON THE WINDOWS FOLDER OR
OTHER SYSTEM FOLDERS, <rt-click> the drive or directory being shared
and select ...
Properties
Security
... and ensure the permissions above are replicated on the drive or
folder itself.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-03-17 16:02:38 UTC
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Post by Java Jive
It might be better if you told us what you are trying to accomplish ...
Post by Will Renkel
I have 2 windows 7 puters. I would like to telnet
Telnet specifically? Telnet is an insecure easily intercepted means of
[snip]
Post by Java Jive
Post by Will Renkel
and ftp
between them.
Again FTP is insecure because it's sent unencrypted. At least use
[HUGE essay snipped.]

FGS: he hasn't said he's running a nuclear power station, munitions
factory, or even a business!

Your concerns about the insecurity of Telnet and FTP are almost
certainly justified - but, I don't think it was necessary to go into
such length without giving him the option to come back to you with some
indication of what sort of situation he's in. They might even be a
couple of computers that are wired together and have no outside world
connection, in which case it doesn't matter _how_ insecure any
communication between them is - and, in fact, complex encrypted
communication would just make the whole thing more complicated, at least
to one who knows telnet and ftp but not the others you mention.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

I can prove anything with statistics - except the truth.
Java Jive
2018-03-17 16:17:53 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Java Jive
It might be better if you told us what you are trying to accomplish ...
I have 2 windows 7 puters.  I would like to telnet
Telnet specifically?  Telnet is an insecure easily intercepted means of
[snip]
Post by Java Jive
and ftp
between them.
Again FTP is insecure because it's sent unencrypted.  At least use
[HUGE essay snipped.]
FGS: he hasn't said he's running a nuclear power station, munitions
factory, or even a business!
Despite what you write below, it's extremely likely that the computers
are in use, are likely to have some sort of personal data on them, and
also are connected to the internet in some way, so telnet and FTP should
not be used.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Your concerns about the insecurity of Telnet and FTP are almost
certainly justified - but, I don't think it was necessary to go into
such length without giving him the option to come back to you with some
indication of what sort of situation he's in.
What you call an 'essay' was simply a set of instructions to set up
secure sharing, which could be useful to anyone, not just the OP.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
They might even be a
couple of computers that are wired together and have no outside world
connection
Possible, but unlikely - given that he is likely to have some sort of
router to be communicating with us, the further likelihood is that the
two PCs are connected via that same router, either cabled or wirelessly,
and the instructions I gave will enable him to share files between the
two securely.
Will Renkel
2018-03-18 12:11:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Java Jive
It might be better if you told us what you are trying to accomplish ...
Post by Will Renkel
I have 2 windows 7 puters. I would like to telnet
Telnet specifically? Telnet is an insecure easily intercepted means of
communication, because it travels unencrypted. For this reason, as
others have said, by default in W7+, may actually be Vista+, the service
required for the remote end of the communication path is not installed,
and you'd have to find out how to install it. Even on 2k/XP, the
service, though installed, is disabled by default.
It's not what you are asking, but for communication with my Linux boxes
from W7, almost exclusively I use Putty + ssl. Even on my own home
cabled network, I only use telnet briefly in emergencies when it's the
only thing that will work.
Depending on what you want to do, probably you'd do better to use the
means of communications that Windows provides, which are Remote
Assistance and Remote Desktop, see ...
Control Panel, System, Advanced system settings, Remote
... though I ought to say these are one of the first things I disable on
any new W7 installation!
Again, why do you need this sort of terminal-based communication? If
you'd explain that, we might be able to suggest better alternatives for
accomplishing what you want.
Post by Will Renkel
and ftp
between them.
Again FTP is insecure because it's sent unencrypted. At least use SFTP,
but why not use Windows sharing which is based on Server Message Block
(SMB often referred to as Samba), which is secure, as long as you set it
up properly.
Here is an extended quote from a post of mine to an old thread which
IMO, M$'s default sharing arrangements have always been insecure, as
perhaps you are realising. What follows is the comparatively secure
way that I've always set up sharing, ever since Windows 2000.
Note: These are W7 instructions only, other versions of Windows will
obviously be similar but not exactly the same, because of M$'
pointless and idiotic habit of hiding all the control levers in
different places with every new edition of Windows, thus forcing
people continually to relearn everything they've known for years. (Can
you imagine the catastrophic chaos that would result on the roads if
car manufacturers decided to do that?).
In what follows, I assume that you want to create shares on each PC
visible to others, and that none are work PCs signing on to a domain
server.
1) Go into ...
Control Panel, All Control Panel Items, System,
Advanced system settings, Computer Name, Change
... and ensure that name and workgroup are changed to something
memorable from the defaults, and that the former is unique, and the
latter is the same for all the machines that you wish to share files
together. If you make changes here, before trying out the sharing you
will need to reboot at some point so that the system can pick up the
changes, but it needn't be done immediately.
2) Any user wishing to access a share on a PC must have a user
account on that PC, so set up the necessary accounts up on each PC,
giving them the same logon user id and passwd as they normally use on
their own PC. (If on a particular PC you want a user only to be able
to access a share, but not be able to sign on to it, you still need
his/her account to exist, but then it must be added to a block list in
that PC's security policy - however, this may not be possible on
some lower cost editions of Windows, and is beyond the scope of these
notes). To add user accounts, go into Control Panel, User Accounts, or
else <rt-click> My Computer and select Manage, and then Local Users and
Groups, Users.
3) Go into ...
Control Panel, All Control Panel Items,
Network and Sharing Center, Advanced sharing settings
Network discovery
Probably on, unless reason otherwise;
File and printer sharing
Probably on, unless reason otherwise;
Public folder sharing
Probably off, unless reason otherwise;
Media streaming
Probably off, unless reason otherwise;
File sharing connections
Use 128-bit, unless reason otherwise;
Password protected sharing
Turn on;
HomeGroup connections
Select 'Use user accounts and passwords'.
4) On each directory or drive of each machine that you want to
share...
<rt-click>, then choose
Share with, Advanced sharing, Advanced sharing;
Select Share this folder;
Type a suitable share name
(note that ending it with a '$' will hide it
from users casually browsing from other PCs);
Type a suitable comment, if required;
Click Permissions, remove the relatively insecure
default permissions offered, and then click ...
Add, Advanced, Find Now
... and by <click>ing and <ctrl-click>ing select and add
Admininstrators
System
Authenticated Users
... and then give them the following permissions ...
Admininstrators Full Control
System Full Control
Authenticated Users Read or Read/Change as
required
5) If necessary, but DO NOT DO THE FOLLOWING ON THE WINDOWS FOLDER OR
OTHER SYSTEM FOLDERS, <rt-click> the drive or directory being shared
and select ...
Properties
Security
... and ensure the permissions above are replicated on the drive or
folder itself.
thanx for info, but I believe my "network" is qite secure.
Its solely ikn my house with router and 2 pujtgers
Obe is a laptop downstairs
the other desktop upstairs.
I have dtp running tween them
But telnet is really desired as well.
I will look at your info and see what I can glean from it

Agail thanx
Will renkel
--
---------------------------------------------------------------
Will Renkel
Wheaton, Ill.

---------------------------------------------------------------
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