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Cloudflare launches 1.1.1.1 DNS service that will speed up your internet
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Mr. Man-wai Chang
2018-04-03 06:12:06 UTC
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Full story:
<https://www.theverge.com/2018/4/1/17185732/cloudflare-dns-service-1-1-1-1>

Cloudflare is launching its own consumer DNS service today, on April
Fools’ Day, that promises to speed up your internet connection and help
keep it private. The service is using https://1.1.1.1, and it’s not a
joke but an actual DNS resolver that anyone can use. Cloudflare claims
it will be “the Internet’s fastest, privacy-first consumer DNS service.”
While OpenDNS and Google DNS both exist, Cloudflare is focusing heavily
on the privacy aspect of its own DNS service with a promise to wipe all
logs of DNS queries within 24 hours.

DNS services are typically provided by internet service providers to
resolve a domain name like Google.com into a real IP address that
routers and switches understand. It’s an essential part of the internet,
but DNS servers provided by ISPs are often slow and unreliable. ISPs or
any Wi-Fi network you connect to can also use DNS servers to identify
all sites that are visited, which presents privacy problems. DNS also
played an important role in helping Turkish citizens avoid a Twitter ban.

"Cloudflare worked with APNIC to get 1.1.1.1 working"

Cloudflare has worked with APNIC to offer its DNS service through
1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1. Lots of people have used 1.1.1.1 as a dummy
address, and APNIC have tried in the past to analyze the flood of
traffic to the IP address and been overwhelmed. “We talked to the APNIC
team about how we wanted to create a privacy-first, extremely fast DNS
system,” explains Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince. “We offered
Cloudflare’s network to receive and study the garbage traffic in
exchange for being able to offer a DNS resolver on the memorable IPs.
And, with that, 1.1.1.1 was born.”

.... more .....

Full story:
<https://www.theverge.com/2018/4/1/17185732/cloudflare-dns-service-1-1-1-1>
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Andy Burns
2018-04-03 07:14:18 UTC
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Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
The service is using https://1.1.1.1, and it’s not a
joke but an actual DNS resolver
DNS on TCP:443 instead of UDP:53 would be a good joke ...
Char Jackson
2018-04-03 07:50:53 UTC
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Post by Andy Burns
The service is using https://1.1.1.1, and it’s not a
joke but an actual DNS resolver
DNS on TCP:443 instead of UDP:53 would be a good joke ...
That caught my eye, as well, but TCP:443 is just a web site that
explains what they're doing and how to configure it locally. The actual
DNS server is at UDP:53, as you'd expect.

I'm sure you noticed that, so this is for others who might have
wondered. FWIW, for me, it's as fast as Google's DNS, but not any
faster.
Andy Burns
2018-04-03 08:24:16 UTC
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Post by Char Jackson
Post by Andy Burns
DNS on TCP:443 instead of UDP:53 would be a good joke ...
That caught my eye, as well, but TCP:443 is just a web site that
explains what they're doing and how to configure it locally. The actual
DNS server is at UDP:53, as you'd expect.
I had a look, and it seems they *are* offering DNSoverHTTPS

<https://developers.cloudflare.com/1.1.1.1/dns-over-https>
Post by Char Jackson
I'm sure you noticed that, so this is for others who might have
wondered. FWIW, for me, it's as fast as Google's DNS, but not any
faster.
Doesn't seem any faster, all the quad DNS servers 1.1.1.1, 8.8.8.8 and
9.9.9.9 are 15 milliseconds away from here. Verizon's 4.4.4.4 no longer
seems to work, but they never encouraged non-customers to use it.

One interesting tit-bit I noticed while reading Cloudflare's blog is
that they opened one data centre per day last month, maybe they actually
mean they established a presence in someone else's data centres?
Char Jackson
2018-04-03 17:26:05 UTC
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Post by Andy Burns
Post by Char Jackson
Post by Andy Burns
DNS on TCP:443 instead of UDP:53 would be a good joke ...
That caught my eye, as well, but TCP:443 is just a web site that
explains what they're doing and how to configure it locally. The actual
DNS server is at UDP:53, as you'd expect.
I had a look, and it seems they *are* offering DNSoverHTTPS
<https://developers.cloudflare.com/1.1.1.1/dns-over-https>
But that's not going to be available to the general public. You need a
special DNS client for that.
Post by Andy Burns
Doesn't seem any faster, all the quad DNS servers 1.1.1.1, 8.8.8.8 and
9.9.9.9 are 15 milliseconds away from here. Verizon's 4.4.4.4 no longer
seems to work, but they never encouraged non-customers to use it.
For a moment, I thought you meant the nameservers at 4.2.2.[2-4]. Those
still work.
Tim
2018-04-03 07:27:52 UTC
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Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
<https://www.theverge.com/2018/4/1/17185732/cloudflare-dns-service-1-1-
1-1>
Cloudflare is launching its own consumer DNS service today, on April
Fools’ Day, that promises to speed up your internet connection and
help keep it private. The service is using https://1.1.1.1, and it’s
not a joke but an actual DNS resolver that anyone can use. Cloudflare
claims it will be “the Internet’s fastest, privacy-first consumer
DNS service.” While OpenDNS and Google DNS both exist, Cloudflare is
focusing heavily on the privacy aspect of its own DNS service with a
promise to wipe all logs of DNS queries within 24 hours.
DNS services are typically provided by internet service providers to
resolve a domain name like Google.com into a real IP address that
routers and switches understand. It’s an essential part of the
internet, but DNS servers provided by ISPs are often slow and
unreliable. ISPs or any Wi-Fi network you connect to can also use DNS
servers to identify all sites that are visited, which presents privacy
problems. DNS also played an important role in helping Turkish
citizens avoid a Twitter ban.
"Cloudflare worked with APNIC to get 1.1.1.1 working"
Cloudflare has worked with APNIC to offer its DNS service through
1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1. Lots of people have used 1.1.1.1 as a dummy
address, and APNIC have tried in the past to analyze the flood of
traffic to the IP address and been overwhelmed. “We talked to the
APNIC team about how we wanted to create a privacy-first, extremely
fast DNS system,” explains Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince. “We
offered Cloudflare’s network to receive and study the garbage
traffic in exchange for being able to offer a DNS resolver on the
memorable IPs. And, with that, 1.1.1.1 was born.”
.... more .....
<https://www.theverge.com/2018/4/1/17185732/cloudflare-dns-service-1-1-
1-1>
I read an article about this this am. My ISP seems to have periodic DNS
problems, so I was open to trying something else. I switched to 1.1.1.1
and immediately noticed a much faster snap to everything that would use a
DNS.
Libor Striz
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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I highly doubt it would make internet connection generally faster.

Many years ago came OpenDNS, with domain classification and DNS
filtering. It also claimed faster internet.

But the DNS benchmarking tool by Gibson research revealed it was
for cached and uncached queries much slower that my ISP
DNS.

Plus, it is cheap way to track habits of a bunch of users and sell
the data.

For filtering, more efficient are good hosts files, like MSVP one
at local DNS client, or at browser level e.g in the uBlock
origin.
--
Libor Striz aka Poutnik ( a pilgrim/wanderer/wayfarer)


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Rene Lamontagne
2018-04-03 14:49:02 UTC
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Post by Libor Striz
I highly doubt it would make internet connection generally faster.
Many years ago came OpenDNS, with domain classification and DNS
filtering. It also claimed faster internet.
But the DNS benchmarking tool by Gibson research revealed it was
for cached and uncached queries much slower that my ISP
DNS.
Plus, it is cheap way to track habits of a bunch of users and sell
the data.
For filtering, more efficient are good hosts files, like MSVP one
at local DNS client, or at browser level e.g in the uBlock
origin.
Well I added 1.1.1.1 to Gibsons DNSbench
And find all this hoopla is rather misleading and not worth bothering
with. It benches at about half the speed of my current Shaw Cable resolvers.

Rene
Shadow
2018-04-03 16:17:44 UTC
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On Tue, 3 Apr 2018 12:07:47 +0200 (GMT+02:00), Libor Striz
Post by Libor Striz
Plus, it is cheap way to track habits of a bunch of users and sell
the data.
Hum. That seems to be the most relevant "feature".

8 8 8 8 represents four pairs of eyes, completely in the dark
.... I'll ponder over 1 1 1 1.
[]'s
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We have a new policy - Google 2012
David E. Ross
2018-04-04 03:40:27 UTC
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Post by Libor Striz
I highly doubt it would make internet connection generally faster.
Many years ago came OpenDNS, with domain classification and DNS
filtering. It also claimed faster internet.
But the DNS benchmarking tool by Gibson research revealed it was
for cached and uncached queries much slower that my ISP
DNS.
Plus, it is cheap way to track habits of a bunch of users and sell
the data.
For filtering, more efficient are good hosts files, like MSVP one
at local DNS client, or at browser level e.g in the uBlock
origin.
I too use Gibson Research's DNSBench. I ran it about an hour ago. It
found 11 DNSes that have better responses than 1.1.1.1.

I also notices that 1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1 both resolve to the same domain
name. That raises the question wether they are actually the same server
instead of two different servers.
--
David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/>

First you say you do, and then you don't.
And then you say you will, but then won't.
You're undecided now, so what're you goin' to do?
From a 1950s song
That should be Donald Trump's theme song. He obviously
does not understand "commitment", whether it is about
policy or marriage.
Libor Striz
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by David E. Ross
[...]
I also notices that 1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1 both resolve to the same domain
name. That raises the question wether they are actually the same server
instead of two different servers.
One domain name can have more IP addresses, if the DNS server is
configured to apply the round robin as a server load balance,
typically Google search servers.

OTOH, 1 computer has multiple IPs only if it has multiple network
interfaces.
--
Libor Striz aka Poutnik ( a pilgrim/wanderer/wayfarer)


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
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Melzzzzz
2018-04-04 04:38:42 UTC
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Post by Libor Striz
Post by David E. Ross
[...]
I also notices that 1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1 both resolve to the same domain
name. That raises the question wether they are actually the same server
instead of two different servers.
One domain name can have more IP addresses, if the DNS server is
configured to apply the round robin as a server load balance,
typically Google search servers.
OTOH, 1 computer has multiple IPs only if it has multiple network
interfaces.
Not true on Linux. You can have eth0:1 - eth0:x ip addresses on same
interface...
--
press any key to continue or any other to quit...
Libor Striz
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Melzzzzz
Post by Libor Striz
Post by David E. Ross
[...]
I also notices that 1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1 both resolve to the same domain
name. That raises the question wether they are actually the same server
instead of two different servers.
One domain name can have more IP addresses, if the DNS server is
configured to apply the round robin as a server load balance,
typically Google search servers.
OTOH, 1 computer has multiple IPs only if it has multiple network
interfaces.
Not true on Linux. You can have eth0:1 - eth0:x ip addresses on same
interface...
Hmm, interesting.

It would make sense for some high availability systems.

But are not they then virtual interfaces ?
Does it present the same or different MACs ?
--
Libor Striz aka Poutnik ( a pilgrim/wanderer/wayfarer)


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Libor Striz
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Libor Striz
Post by Melzzzzz
Post by Libor Striz
Post by David E. Ross
[...]
I also notices that 1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1 both resolve to the same domain
name. That raises the question wether they are actually the same server
instead of two different servers.
One domain name can have more IP addresses, if the DNS server is
configured to apply the round robin as a server load balance,
typically Google search servers.
OTOH, 1 computer has multiple IPs only if it has multiple network
interfaces.
Not true on Linux. You can have eth0:1 - eth0:x ip addresses on same
interface...
Hmm, interesting.
It would make sense for some high availability systems.
But are not they then virtual interfaces ?
Does it present the same or different MACs ?
Ah, I will answer myself. Both ways.
The latter is typical for virtualization environment.

See also

https://serverfault.com/q/312221/406984
--
Libor Striz aka Poutnik ( a pilgrim/wanderer/wayfarer)


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Melzzzzz
2018-04-04 05:27:25 UTC
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Post by Libor Striz
Post by Melzzzzz
Post by Libor Striz
Post by David E. Ross
[...]
I also notices that 1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1 both resolve to the same domain
name. That raises the question wether they are actually the same server
instead of two different servers.
One domain name can have more IP addresses, if the DNS server is
configured to apply the round robin as a server load balance,
typically Google search servers.
OTOH, 1 computer has multiple IPs only if it has multiple network
interfaces.
Not true on Linux. You can have eth0:1 - eth0:x ip addresses on same
interface...
Hmm, interesting.
It would make sense for some high availability systems.
But are not they then virtual interfaces ?
Does it present the same or different MACs ?
Same MAC. I don't know how are they called but you can assign them
anyway.
--
press any key to continue or any other to quit...
Anssi Saari
2018-04-04 09:42:14 UTC
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Post by Melzzzzz
Post by Libor Striz
Post by Melzzzzz
Post by Libor Striz
Post by David E. Ross
[...]
I also notices that 1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1 both resolve to the same domain
name. That raises the question wether they are actually the same server
instead of two different servers.
One domain name can have more IP addresses, if the DNS server is
configured to apply the round robin as a server load balance,
typically Google search servers.
OTOH, 1 computer has multiple IPs only if it has multiple network
interfaces.
Not true on Linux. You can have eth0:1 - eth0:x ip addresses on same
interface...
Hmm, interesting.
It would make sense for some high availability systems.
But are not they then virtual interfaces ?
Does it present the same or different MACs ?
Same MAC. I don't know how are they called but you can assign them
anyway.
They are called IP aliases. There's even an ancient "Setting up IP
Aliasing on A Linux Machine Mini-HOWTO" at
http://www.faqs.org/docs/Linux-mini/IP-Alias.html. Apparently this is
supported on Windows as well and I think I've used this on FreeBSD too,
so presumably most Unixes support it.

In Linux they're configured via ifconfig normally e.g. if you have eth0
you can do ifconfig eth0:0 a.b.c.d netmask whatever or with the ip
command (something like ip address add a.b.c.d/whatever dev eth0).

I used this long ago when I had public IP addresses (and single NICs) on
my PCs at home but wanted to have a local network too so local traffic
didn't circle out and back via ADSL.

I think the downside was that with iptables you couldn't then
differentiate between internal and external traffic except by trusting
the source address so any address-spoofed external traffic would be free
to come through the iptables firewall. No idea if such spoofed traffic
was allowed by ISPs even back then.

Apparently a more common use case for IP aliases is running multiple
instances of some server software on the same machine without having to
use different ports.
Andy Burns
2018-04-04 06:57:33 UTC
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Post by Melzzzzz
1 computer has multiple IPs only if it has multiple network
interfaces.
Not true on Linux. You can have eth0:1 - eth0:x ip addresses on same
interface...
Not true for Windows either.
Libor Striz
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Andy Burns
Post by Melzzzzz
1 computer has multiple IPs only if it has multiple network
interfaces.
Not true on Linux. You can have eth0:1 - eth0:x ip addresses on same
interface...
Not true for Windows either.
Ok, my mistake. So just usually.

But if high load is supposed as for widely used DNS servers,
then DNS round robin to more servers seems to me as more probable
and efficient.
--
Libor Striz aka Poutnik ( a pilgrim/wanderer/wayfarer)


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Andy Burns
2018-04-04 08:05:11 UTC
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Post by Libor Striz
if high load is supposed as for widely used DNS servers,
then DNS round robin to more servers seems to me as more probable
Large scale DNS servers are usually provided over "anycast" IP
addresses, so you route to one that's (a) up, and (b) close to your ISP.
Char Jackson
2018-04-04 14:31:11 UTC
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Post by Andy Burns
Post by Melzzzzz
1 computer has multiple IPs only if it has multiple network
interfaces.
Not true on Linux. You can have eth0:1 - eth0:x ip addresses on same
interface...
Not true for Windows either.
Right. I stack multiple IPs on a single Windows NIC all the time.
Tim
2018-04-04 10:11:54 UTC
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Post by Libor Striz
Post by David E. Ross
[...]
I also notices that 1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1 both resolve to the same domain
name. That raises the question wether they are actually the same server
instead of two different servers.
One domain name can have more IP addresses, if the DNS server is
configured to apply the round robin as a server load balance,
typically Google search servers.
OTOH, 1 computer has multiple IPs only if it has multiple network
interfaces.
The problem is that if it is the same server then it is a single point of
failure. Hopefully, they have a backup available.
Richard Kettlewell
2018-04-04 07:28:49 UTC
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Post by David E. Ross
I too use Gibson Research's DNSBench. I ran it about an hour ago. It
found 11 DNSes that have better responses than 1.1.1.1.
I also notices that 1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1 both resolve to the same domain
name. That raises the question wether they are actually the same server
instead of two different servers.
It’s an anycast address, it’s large numbers of servers distributed
around the world.
--
https://www.greenend.org.uk/rjk/
Dirk T. Verbeek
2018-04-03 20:45:57 UTC
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Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
<https://www.theverge.com/2018/4/1/17185732/cloudflare-dns-service-1-1-1-1>
Cloudflare is launching its own consumer DNS service today, on April
Fools’ Day, that promises to speed up your internet connection and help
keep it private. The service is using https://1.1.1.1, and it’s not a
joke but an actual DNS resolver that anyone can use. Cloudflare claims
it will be “the Internet’s fastest, privacy-first consumer DNS service.”
While OpenDNS and Google DNS both exist, Cloudflare is focusing heavily
on the privacy aspect of its own DNS service with a promise to wipe all
logs of DNS queries within 24 hours.
DNS services are typically provided by internet service providers to
resolve a domain name like Google.com into a real IP address that
routers and switches understand. It’s an essential part of the internet,
but DNS servers provided by ISPs are often slow and unreliable. ISPs or
any Wi-Fi network you connect to can also use DNS servers to identify
all sites that are visited, which presents privacy problems. DNS also
played an important role in helping Turkish citizens avoid a Twitter ban.
"Cloudflare worked with APNIC to get 1.1.1.1 working"
Cloudflare has worked with APNIC to offer its DNS service through
1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1. Lots of people have used 1.1.1.1 as a dummy
address, and APNIC have tried in the past to analyze the flood of
traffic to the IP address and been overwhelmed. “We talked to the APNIC
team about how we wanted to create a privacy-first, extremely fast DNS
system,” explains Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince. “We offered
Cloudflare’s network to receive and study the garbage traffic in
exchange for being able to offer a DNS resolver on the memorable IPs.
And, with that, 1.1.1.1 was born.”
.... more .....
<https://www.theverge.com/2018/4/1/17185732/cloudflare-dns-service-1-1-1-1>
Nice for those with a bad provider who would otherwise be the product
for Google.
Caver1
2018-04-03 21:08:06 UTC
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Post by Dirk T. Verbeek
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
<https://www.theverge.com/2018/4/1/17185732/cloudflare-dns-service-1-1-1-1>
Cloudflare is launching its own consumer DNS service today, on April
Fools’ Day, that promises to speed up your internet connection and help
keep it private. The service is using https://1.1.1.1, and it’s not a
joke but an actual DNS resolver that anyone can use. Cloudflare claims
it will be “the Internet’s fastest, privacy-first consumer DNS service.”
While OpenDNS and Google DNS both exist, Cloudflare is focusing heavily
on the privacy aspect of its own DNS service with a promise to wipe all
logs of DNS queries within 24 hours.
DNS services are typically provided by internet service providers to
resolve a domain name like Google.com into a real IP address that
routers and switches understand. It’s an essential part of the internet,
but DNS servers provided by ISPs are often slow and unreliable. ISPs or
any Wi-Fi network you connect to can also use DNS servers to identify
all sites that are visited, which presents privacy problems. DNS also
played an important role in helping Turkish citizens avoid a Twitter ban.
"Cloudflare worked with APNIC to get 1.1.1.1 working"
Cloudflare has worked with APNIC to offer its DNS service through
1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1. Lots of people have used 1.1.1.1 as a dummy
address, and APNIC have tried in the past to analyze the flood of
traffic to the IP address and been overwhelmed. “We talked to the APNIC
team about how we wanted to create a privacy-first, extremely fast DNS
system,” explains Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince. “We offered
Cloudflare’s network to receive and study the garbage traffic in
exchange for being able to offer a DNS resolver on the memorable IPs.
And, with that, 1.1.1.1 was born.”
.... more .....
<https://www.theverge.com/2018/4/1/17185732/cloudflare-dns-service-1-1-1-1>
Nice for those with a bad provider who would otherwise be the product
for Google.
How about Knot Resolver?
--
Caver1
Rene Lamontagne
2018-04-04 16:27:32 UTC
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Post by Caver1
Post by Dirk T. Verbeek
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
<https://www.theverge.com/2018/4/1/17185732/cloudflare-dns-service-1-1-1-1>
Cloudflare is launching its own consumer DNS service today, on April
Fools’ Day, that promises to speed up your internet connection and help
keep it private. The service is using https://1.1.1.1, and it’s not a
joke but an actual DNS resolver that anyone can use. Cloudflare claims
it will be “the Internet’s fastest, privacy-first consumer DNS service.”
While OpenDNS and Google DNS both exist, Cloudflare is focusing heavily
on the privacy aspect of its own DNS service with a promise to wipe all
logs of DNS queries within 24 hours.
DNS services are typically provided by internet service providers to
resolve a domain name like Google.com into a real IP address that
routers and switches understand. It’s an essential part of the internet,
but DNS servers provided by ISPs are often slow and unreliable. ISPs or
any Wi-Fi network you connect to can also use DNS servers to identify
all sites that are visited, which presents privacy problems. DNS also
played an important role in helping Turkish citizens avoid a Twitter ban.
"Cloudflare worked with APNIC to get 1.1.1.1 working"
Cloudflare has worked with APNIC to offer its DNS service through
1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1. Lots of people have used 1.1.1.1 as a dummy
address, and APNIC have tried in the past to analyze the flood of
traffic to the IP address and been overwhelmed. “We talked to the APNIC
team about how we wanted to create a privacy-first, extremely fast DNS
system,” explains Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince. “We offered
Cloudflare’s network to receive and study the garbage traffic in
exchange for being able to offer a DNS resolver on the memorable IPs.
And, with that, 1.1.1.1 was born.”
.... more .....
<https://www.theverge.com/2018/4/1/17185732/cloudflare-dns-service-1-1-1-1>
Nice for those with a bad provider who would otherwise be the product
for Google.
How about Knot Resolver?
Seeing we are on the DNS subject I have a question. When I run Gibsons
DNSbench I get this one as the fastest, listed at the top.
192.168.0.1
Can this be used as a DNS server as the others can?
I don't recall it being listed in past tests done in the last year or two.

Rene
Libor Striz
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Rene Lamontagne
Post by Caver1
Post by Dirk T. Verbeek
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
<https://www.theverge.com/2018/4/1/17185732/cloudflare-dns-service-1-1-1-1>
Cloudflare is launching its own consumer DNS service today, on April
Fools’ Day, that promises to speed up your internet connection and help
keep it private. The service is using https://1.1.1.1, and it’s not a
joke but an actual DNS resolver that anyone can use. Cloudflare claims
it will be “the Internet’s fastest, privacy-first consumer DNS service.”
While OpenDNS and Google DNS both exist, Cloudflare is focusing heavily
on the privacy aspect of its own DNS service with a promise to wipe all
logs of DNS queries within 24 hours.
DNS services are typically provided by internet service providers to
resolve a domain name like Google.com into a real IP address that
routers and switches understand. It’s an essential part of the internet,
but DNS servers provided by ISPs are often slow and unreliable. ISPs or
any Wi-Fi network you connect to can also use DNS servers to identify
all sites that are visited, which presents privacy problems. DNS also
played an important role in helping Turkish citizens avoid a Twitter ban.
"Cloudflare worked with APNIC to get 1.1.1.1 working"
Cloudflare has worked with APNIC to offer its DNS service through
1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1. Lots of people have used 1.1.1.1 as a dummy
address, and APNIC have tried in the past to analyze the flood of
traffic to the IP address and been overwhelmed. “We talked to the APNIC
team about how we wanted to create a privacy-first, extremely fast DNS
system,” explains Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince. “We offered
Cloudflare’s network to receive and study the garbage traffic in
exchange for being able to offer a DNS resolver on the memorable IPs.
And, with that, 1.1.1.1 was born.”
.... more .....
<https://www.theverge.com/2018/4/1/17185732/cloudflare-dns-service-1-1-1-1>
Nice for those with a bad provider who would otherwise be the product
for Google.
How about Knot Resolver?
Seeing we are on the DNS subject I have a question. When I run Gibsons
DNSbench I get this one as the fastest, listed at the top.
192.168.0.1
Can this be used as a DNS server as the others can?
I don't recall it being listed in past tests done in the last year or two.
Rene
That is very probably the caching DNS server of your router, as
it 8s a typical IP of default gateway of LAN behind a home
router.

It would be blazing fast for cached results, but for noncached
ones it depends what DNS servers it has set to ask. Probably of
Your ISP, given by DHCP server.
--
Libor Striz aka Poutnik ( a pilgrim/wanderer/wayfarer)


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
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Andy Burns
2018-04-04 16:51:32 UTC
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When I run Gibsons DNSbench I get this one as the fastest, listed at
the top. 192.168.0.1
That'll be your cable/broadband router ...
Rene Lamontagne
2018-04-04 19:24:20 UTC
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Post by Andy Burns
When I run Gibsons DNSbench I get this one as the fastest, listed at
the top. 192.168.0.1
That'll be your cable/broadband router ...
Right, I checked my Cisco router at 192.168.0.1 and Find both DNS
servers are my ISPs, so I plugged them into Gibsons DNS bench and let er
rip. They came up as the 2 fastest ones so I switched to them in my Ipv4
settings.

Rene
Char Jackson
2018-04-04 21:28:30 UTC
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Post by Rene Lamontagne
Post by Andy Burns
When I run Gibsons DNSbench I get this one as the fastest, listed at
the top. 192.168.0.1
That'll be your cable/broadband router ...
Right, I checked my Cisco router at 192.168.0.1 and Find both DNS
servers are my ISPs, so I plugged them into Gibsons DNS bench and let er
rip. They came up as the 2 fastest ones so I switched to them in my Ipv4
settings.
A couple of pros and cons of ISP DNS servers:

Pro: they are usually fastest, which makes sense because they should be
the fewest number of hops away from you.

Con: they frequently have a bad reputation, depending on the ISP, for
failing at inopportune times (that would be whenever *you* need it) or
doing weird things when something doesn't resolve, like sending you to
their own 'soft landing' page where they have a chance to advertise
something.
Rene Lamontagne
2018-04-04 23:07:16 UTC
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Post by Char Jackson
Post by Rene Lamontagne
Post by Andy Burns
When I run Gibsons DNSbench I get this one as the fastest, listed at
the top. 192.168.0.1
That'll be your cable/broadband router ...
Right, I checked my Cisco router at 192.168.0.1 and Find both DNS
servers are my ISPs, so I plugged them into Gibsons DNS bench and let er
rip. They came up as the 2 fastest ones so I switched to them in my Ipv4
settings.
Pro: they are usually fastest, which makes sense because they should be
the fewest number of hops away from you.
Con: they frequently have a bad reputation, depending on the ISP, for
failing at inopportune times (that would be whenever *you* need it) or
doing weird things when something doesn't resolve, like sending you to
their own 'soft landing' page where they have a chance to advertise
something.
Pretty happy with my ISP, Getting 178 Gb down on a 150 gig plan, No
outages to speak of, Good service when required (not often) been with
them since 1968 when they started as a TV provider.
Only gripe is the escalating prices.

Rene
Tim
2018-04-05 04:25:54 UTC
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Post by Rene Lamontagne
Post by Char Jackson
Con: they frequently have a bad reputation, depending on the ISP, for
failing at inopportune times (that would be whenever *you* need it)
or doing weird things when something doesn't resolve, like sending
you to their own 'soft landing' page where they have a chance to
advertise something.
Pretty happy with my ISP, Getting 178 Gb down on a 150 gig plan, No
outages to speak of, Good service when required (not often) been with
them since 1968 when they started as a TV provider.
Only gripe is the escalating prices.
Rene
On the other hand, my ISP is basically one of two here in this small city
out in the wilds of Iowa. As an example, almost all of their plans are in
the sub 100mb range. Of course, they are using DSL, so that is very
limiting in and of itself. Anyway, I have notice in the months I have had
this plan that there are times when DNS takes longer than normal to
resolve. An example is when I first open Xnews there would usually be a two
or three second (and sometimes longer) pause before the groups and their
new counts sere listed. As long as I moved through the groups before Xnews
timed out the connection response was very crisp, but if I paused for any
length of time, there would be a delay before starting again.

So I switched to Cloudflare the other day whe the article showed up, and
now everything snaps up right away. It is enough to be very noticable. I
will watch it, but right now this looks like the way to go for me at least.
Libor Striz
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Tim
Post by Rene Lamontagne
Post by Char Jackson
Con: they frequently have a bad reputation, depending on the ISP, for
failing at inopportune times (that would be whenever *you* need it)
or doing weird things when something doesn't resolve, like sending
you to their own 'soft landing' page where they have a chance to
advertise something.
Pretty happy with my ISP, Getting 178 Gb down on a 150 gig plan, No
outages to speak of, Good service when required (not often) been with
them since 1968 when they started as a TV provider.
Only gripe is the escalating prices.
Rene
On the other hand, my ISP is basically one of two here in this small city
out in the wilds of Iowa. As an example, almost all of their plans are in
the sub 100mb range. Of course, they are using DSL, so that is very
limiting in and of itself. Anyway, I have notice in the months I have had
this plan that there are times when DNS takes longer than normal to
resolve. An example is when I first open Xnews there would usually be a two
or three second (and sometimes longer) pause before the groups and their
new counts sere listed. As long as I moved through the groups before Xnews
timed out the connection response was very crisp, but if I paused for any
length of time, there would be a delay before starting again.
So I switched to Cloudflare the other day whe the article showed up, and
now everything snaps up right away. It is enough to be very noticable. I
will watch it, but right now this looks like the way to go for me at least.
It makes sense to keep LAN devices DNS set to the router and the
router set to DNS servers of you choice.

Than the router by caching DNS speeds up traffic of local LAN, as
devices may come to ready cached records.
--
Libor Striz aka Poutnik ( a pilgrim/wanderer/wayfarer)


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
David E. Ross
2018-04-05 00:47:11 UTC
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Post by Rene Lamontagne
Seeing we are on the DNS subject I have a question. When I run Gibsons
DNSbench I get this one as the fastest, listed at the top.
192.168.0.1
Can this be used as a DNS server as the others can?
I don't recall it being listed in past tests done in the last year or two.
Rene
All IP addresses in the range 192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255 (and a few
other ranges) are "private". That means they are local to local-area
networks (LANs). The same IP addresses exits many times in different
LANs. Thus, it cannot possibly be a true DNS.
--
David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/>

First you say you do, and then you don't.
And then you say you will, but then won't.
You're undecided now, so what're you goin' to do?
From a 1950s song
That should be Donald Trump's theme song. He obviously
does not understand "commitment", whether it is about
policy or marriage.
Rene Lamontagne
2018-04-05 16:28:25 UTC
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Post by David E. Ross
Post by Rene Lamontagne
Seeing we are on the DNS subject I have a question. When I run Gibsons
DNSbench I get this one as the fastest, listed at the top.
192.168.0.1
Can this be used as a DNS server as the others can?
I don't recall it being listed in past tests done in the last year or two.
Rene
All IP addresses in the range 192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255 (and a few
other ranges) are "private". That means they are local to local-area
networks (LANs). The same IP addresses exits many times in different
LANs. Thus, it cannot possibly be a true DNS.
Remarkable coincidence! Seeing we have been tossing around DNS server
stuff, when I started up Steve Gibsons DNSbench this morning A popup
announced that he has released a new version yesterday.
Version 1.3.6668.0.

Rene
Mark Lloyd
2018-04-05 19:54:46 UTC
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On 04/05/2018 11:28 AM, Rene Lamontagne wrote:

[snip]
Post by Rene Lamontagne
Remarkable coincidence! Seeing we have been tossing around DNS server
stuff, when I started up Steve Gibsons DNSbench this morning A popup
announced that he has released a new version yesterday.
 Version  1.3.6668.0.
Rene
And 1.1.1.1 appears to be one of the fastest.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/

"And lo, Jesus did say unto the soldiers 'Not the OTHER hand. Ow shit,
that hurts! You assholes!' " [2 Kinison 3:45]
Larc
2018-04-05 20:27:06 UTC
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On Thu, 5 Apr 2018 14:54:46 -0500, Mark Lloyd <***@mail.invalid> wrote:

| On 04/05/2018 11:28 AM, Rene Lamontagne wrote:
|
| [snip]
|
| > Remarkable coincidence! Seeing we have been tossing around DNS server
| > stuff, when I started up Steve Gibsons DNSbench this morning A popup
| > announced that he has released a new version yesterday.
| >  Version  1.3.6668.0.
| >
| > Rene
|
| And 1.1.1.1 appears to be one of the fastest.

1.1.1.1 isn't even among the 50 fastest for me. Same as with the earlier version of
DNSBench that I manually added 1.1.1.1 to.

Larc
Mr. Man-wai Chang
2018-04-06 15:54:37 UTC
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Post by Larc
1.1.1.1 isn't even among the 50 fastest for me. Same as with the earlier version of
DNSBench that I manually added 1.1.1.1 to.
At last, it's faster than my ISP's DNS servers! :)
--
@~@ Remain silent! Drink, Blink, Stretch! Live long and prosper!!
/ v \ Simplicity is Beauty!
/( _ )\ May the Force and farces be with you!
^ ^ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.39.3
不借貸! 不詐騙! 不賭錢! 不援交! 不打交! 不打劫! 不自殺! 不求神! 請考慮綜援
(CSSA):
http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
Rene Lamontagne
2018-04-06 16:07:16 UTC
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Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
1.1.1.1 isn't even among the 50 fastest for me.  Same as with the
earlier version of
DNSBench that I manually added 1.1.1.1 to.
At last, it's faster than my ISP's DNS servers! :)
It must depend a lot on location, On Gibsons DNSbench it was not in the
top 50, so I added it and reran the test and it came out as 49th.
So I guess I will stay with my Shaw Cable entry's.

Rene
Mr. Man-wai Chang
2018-04-06 20:00:11 UTC
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Post by Rene Lamontagne
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
At last, it's faster than my ISP's DNS servers! :)
It must depend a lot on location, On Gibsons DNSbench it was not in the
top 50, so I added it and reran the test and it came out as 49th.
So I guess I will stay with my Shaw Cable entry's.
Which DNS service takes the number one position? Public?
--
@~@ Remain silent! Drink, Blink, Stretch! Live long and prosper!!
/ v \ Simplicity is Beauty!
/( _ )\ May the Force and farces be with you!
^ ^ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.39.3
不借貸! 不詐騙! 不賭錢! 不援交! 不打交! 不打劫! 不自殺! 不求神! 請考慮綜援
(CSSA):
http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
Libor Striz
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Which DNS service takes the number one position? Public?
It is location dependent.
--
Libor Striz aka Poutnik ( a pilgrim/wanderer/wayfarer)


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
Rene Lamontagne
2018-04-06 20:10:29 UTC
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Post by Rene Lamontagne
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
1.1.1.1 isn't even among the 50 fastest for me.  Same as with the
earlier version of
DNSBench that I manually added 1.1.1.1 to.
At last, it's faster than my ISP's DNS servers! :)
It must depend a lot on location, On Gibsons DNSbench it was not in the
top 50, so I added it and reran the test and it came out as 49th.
So I guess I will stay with my Shaw Cable entry's.
Rene
Download Steve Gibsons DNSbench and run your own tests for your
location, It varies by location and whats fastest for me may not be fast
for you.

Rene
Sjouke Burry
2018-04-06 20:42:13 UTC
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Post by Rene Lamontagne
Post by Rene Lamontagne
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Larc
1.1.1.1 isn't even among the 50 fastest for me. Same as with the earlier version of
DNSBench that I manually added 1.1.1.1 to.
At last, it's faster than my ISP's DNS servers! :)
It must depend a lot on location, On Gibsons DNSbench it was not in the
top 50, so I added it and reran the test and it came out as 49th.
So I guess I will stay with my Shaw Cable entry's.
Rene
Download Steve Gibsons DNSbench and run your own tests for your
location, It varies by location and whats fastest for me may not be fast
for you.
Rene
Hey! Nice program.
It reported only one name server, but for that one all green approvel.
Mr. Man-wai Chang
2018-04-07 15:37:25 UTC
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Post by Sjouke Burry
Hey! Nice program.
It reported only one name server, but for that one all green approvel.
You don't just look at colors. Look at exact numbers. Also a network
connection might suddenly have congestion that affects the timing process.

Anyway, tools are just about convenience.
--
@~@ Remain silent! Drink, Blink, Stretch! Live long and prosper!!
/ v \ Simplicity is Beauty!
/( _ )\ May the Force and farces be with you!
^ ^ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.39.3
不借貸! 不詐騙! 不賭錢! 不援交! 不打交! 不打劫! 不自殺! 不求神! 請考慮綜援
(CSSA):
http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
Libor Striz
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Sjouke Burry
Hey! Nice program.
It reported only one name server, but for that one all green approvel.
You don't just look at colors. Look at exact numbers. Also a network
connection might suddenly have congestion that affects the timing process.
That is why each server is queried multiple times, giving for each
the minimum, avg and max response.
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Anyway, tools are just about convenience.
Like computers.
They are not really needed.
It is just convenience.
--
Libor Striz aka Poutnik ( a pilgrim/wanderer/wayfarer)


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
Mr. Man-wai Chang
2018-04-07 22:39:09 UTC
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Post by Libor Striz
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
You don't just look at colors. Look at exact numbers. Also a network
connection might suddenly have congestion that affects the timing process.
That is why each server is queried multiple times, giving for each
the minimum, avg and max response.
Some might take this as a network attack! Don't ... ;)
--
@~@ Remain silent! Drink, Blink, Stretch! Live long and prosper!!
/ v \ Simplicity is Beauty!
/( _ )\ May the Force and farces be with you!
^ ^ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.39.3
不借貸! 不詐騙! 不賭錢! 不援交! 不打交! 不打劫! 不自殺! 不求神! 請考慮綜援
(CSSA):
http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
Char Jackson
2018-04-08 00:49:56 UTC
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On Sun, 8 Apr 2018 06:39:09 +0800, "Mr. Man-wai Chang"
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Libor Striz
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
You don't just look at colors. Look at exact numbers. Also a network
connection might suddenly have congestion that affects the timing process.
That is why each server is queried multiple times, giving for each
the minimum, avg and max response.
Some might take this as a network attack! Don't ... ;)
No, that's not something you need to worry about.
Mr. Man-wai Chang
2018-04-08 10:58:26 UTC
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Post by Char Jackson
No, that's not something you need to worry about.
How could an average computer user deal with professional hackers?
Forget about it! ;)
--
@~@ Remain silent! Drink, Blink, Stretch! Live long and prosper!!
/ v \ Simplicity is Beauty!
/( _ )\ May the Force and farces be with you!
^ ^ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.39.3
不借貸! 不詐騙! 不賭錢! 不援交! 不打交! 不打劫! 不自殺! 不求神! 請考慮綜援
(CSSA):
http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
Char Jackson
2018-04-08 21:39:01 UTC
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On Sun, 8 Apr 2018 18:58:26 +0800, "Mr. Man-wai Chang"
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Char Jackson
No, that's not something you need to worry about.
How could an average computer user deal with professional hackers?
That's quite a topic jump. Multiple DNS requests (perfectly legitimate)
to professional hackers (less legitimate).
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Forget about it! ;)
Ok, done.
Libor Striz
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Libor Striz
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
You don't just look at colors. Look at exact numbers. Also a network
connection might suddenly have congestion that affects the timing process.
That is why each server is queried multiple times, giving for each
the minimum, avg and max response.
Some might take this as a network attack! Don't ... ;)
Only if frequency is high, what is not. They do expect multiple
queries. Even a single webpage can trigger them.
--
Libor Striz aka Poutnik ( a pilgrim/wanderer/wayfarer)


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
Mr. Man-wai Chang
2018-04-07 10:39:30 UTC
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 Download Steve Gibsons DNSbench and run your own tests for your
location, It varies by location and whats fastest for me may not be fast
for you.
You don't need a special tool to test pinging DNS servers?
--
@~@ Remain silent! Drink, Blink, Stretch! Live long and prosper!!
/ v \ Simplicity is Beauty!
/( _ )\ May the Force and farces be with you!
^ ^ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.39.3
不借貸! 不詐騙! 不賭錢! 不援交! 不打交! 不打劫! 不自殺! 不求神! 請考慮綜援
(CSSA):
http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
Libor Striz
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Rene Lamontagne
Download Steve Gibsons DNSbench and run your own tests for your
location, It varies by location and whats fastest for me may not be fast
for you.
You don't need a special tool to test pinging DNS servers?
You do not need a special tool to ping servers.
But pinging DNS servers is not querying DNS servers.
The ping requests do not even reach DNS services.
--
Libor Striz aka Poutnik ( a pilgrim/wanderer/wayfarer)


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
Mr. Man-wai Chang
2018-04-07 15:01:59 UTC
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Post by Libor Striz
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
You don't need a special tool to test pinging DNS servers?
You do not need a special tool to ping servers.
But pinging DNS servers is not querying DNS servers.
The ping requests do not even reach DNS services.
Again, you don't need a special tool to measure the time needed to
complete a search. It's convenient though.
--
@~@ Remain silent! Drink, Blink, Stretch! Live long and prosper!!
/ v \ Simplicity is Beauty!
/( _ )\ May the Force and farces be with you!
^ ^ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.39.3
不借貸! 不詐騙! 不賭錢! 不援交! 不打交! 不打劫! 不自殺! 不求神! 請考慮綜援
(CSSA):
http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
Libor Striz
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Again, you don't need a special tool to measure the time needed to
complete a search. It's convenient though.
But that is not again,
that is a new statement. :-)

I do not remember anybody saying you need that tool.
Tools are usually made to make things convenient, not possible.
--
Libor Striz aka Poutnik ( a pilgrim/wanderer/wayfarer)


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
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Mr. Man-wai Chang
2018-04-07 22:40:07 UTC
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Post by Libor Striz
I do not remember anybody saying you need that tool.
Tools are usually made to make things convenient, not possible.
I really wanna know how that Gibsons DNSbench works. Anyway, maybe you
are not that interested! :)
--
@~@ Remain silent! Drink, Blink, Stretch! Live long and prosper!!
/ v \ Simplicity is Beauty!
/( _ )\ May the Force and farces be with you!
^ ^ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.39.3
不借貸! 不詐騙! 不賭錢! 不援交! 不打交! 不打劫! 不自殺! 不求神! 請考慮綜援
(CSSA):
http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
Char Jackson
2018-04-08 00:51:00 UTC
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On Sun, 8 Apr 2018 06:40:07 +0800, "Mr. Man-wai Chang"
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Libor Striz
I do not remember anybody saying you need that tool.
Tools are usually made to make things convenient, not possible.
I really wanna know how that Gibsons DNSbench works. Anyway, maybe you
are not that interested! :)
There's no magic involved in such a program. What question(s) do you
have? If you know any programming languages, you can easily write your
own.
Mr. Man-wai Chang
2018-04-08 01:45:06 UTC
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Post by Char Jackson
There's no magic involved in such a program. What question(s) do you
have? If you know any programming languages, you can easily write your
own.
DNS is just a telephone directory. But still, we don't know how DNSbench
does it lookup and time measurement. It's just interesting.
--
@~@ Remain silent! Drink, Blink, Stretch! Live long and prosper!!
/ v \ Simplicity is Beauty!
/( _ )\ May the Force and farces be with you!
^ ^ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.39.3
不借貸! 不詐騙! 不賭錢! 不援交! 不打交! 不打劫! 不自殺! 不求神! 請考慮綜援
(CSSA):
http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
Shadow
2018-04-08 10:17:31 UTC
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Post by Char Jackson
On Sun, 8 Apr 2018 06:40:07 +0800, "Mr. Man-wai Chang"
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Libor Striz
I do not remember anybody saying you need that tool.
Tools are usually made to make things convenient, not possible.
I really wanna know how that Gibsons DNSbench works. Anyway, maybe you
are not that interested! :)
There's no magic involved in such a program. What question(s) do you
have? If you know any programming languages, you can easily write your
own.
According to his webpage, he's a programmer. Currently
unemployed. Well, unemployed last time I visited it, some years ago.
Hence my insinuations that he is either trolling (notice the
off-topic groups he keeps adding to the follow-up and the completely
off topic "issues") or has mental issues. Probably both.

To MWC:

DNSBench polls DNS servers from a list (which you can alter
and save as an .ini file), calculates the average time (it polls them
at varying intervals) to get a correct reply. It also sends
random-generated FAKE names to see if the DNS server redirects the
lookups to ad/profiling/datamining pages. Then makes a table with the
results with the most reliable/fastest ones at the top.
It's a tiny 160KB portable program, and there is no malware
present at all. I've been using it ever since Gibson announced the
beta test some 9 years ago.
No, a DNS server will NOT interpret a dozen lookups with
random intervals between them as a DOS attack.
The fastest server is usually your ISP's. Don't forget to add
the IP addresses to the list if and when you finally decide it's not
"black magic" and actually run it.
HTH
[]'s
--
Don't be evil - Google 2004
We have a new policy - Google 2012
David B.
2018-04-08 10:21:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Shadow
Post by Char Jackson
On Sun, 8 Apr 2018 06:40:07 +0800, "Mr. Man-wai Chang"
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Libor Striz
I do not remember anybody saying you need that tool.
Tools are usually made to make things convenient, not possible.
I really wanna know how that Gibsons DNSbench works. Anyway, maybe you
are not that interested! :)
There's no magic involved in such a program. What question(s) do you
have? If you know any programming languages, you can easily write your
own.
According to his webpage, he's a programmer. Currently
unemployed. Well, unemployed last time I visited it, some years ago.
Hence my insinuations that he is either trolling (notice the
off-topic groups he keeps adding to the follow-up and the completely
off topic "issues") or has mental issues. Probably both.
DNSBench polls DNS servers from a list (which you can alter
and save as an .ini file), calculates the average time (it polls them
at varying intervals) to get a correct reply. It also sends
random-generated FAKE names to see if the DNS server redirects the
lookups to ad/profiling/datamining pages. Then makes a table with the
results with the most reliable/fastest ones at the top.
It's a tiny 160KB portable program, and there is no malware
present at all. I've been using it ever since Gibson announced the
beta test some 9 years ago.
No, a DNS server will NOT interpret a dozen lookups with
random intervals between them as a DOS attack.
The fastest server is usually your ISP's. Don't forget to add
the IP addresses to the list if and when you finally decide it's not
"black magic" and actually run it.
HTH
[]'s
Can you suggest how to run it on an Apple iMac?
--
David B.
Shadow
2018-04-08 13:23:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sun, 8 Apr 2018 11:21:11 +0100, "David B."
Post by David B.
Post by Shadow
Post by Char Jackson
On Sun, 8 Apr 2018 06:40:07 +0800, "Mr. Man-wai Chang"
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Libor Striz
I do not remember anybody saying you need that tool.
Tools are usually made to make things convenient, not possible.
I really wanna know how that Gibsons DNSbench works. Anyway, maybe you
are not that interested! :)
There's no magic involved in such a program. What question(s) do you
have? If you know any programming languages, you can easily write your
own.
According to his webpage, he's a programmer. Currently
unemployed. Well, unemployed last time I visited it, some years ago.
Hence my insinuations that he is either trolling (notice the
off-topic groups he keeps adding to the follow-up and the completely
off topic "issues") or has mental issues. Probably both.
DNSBench polls DNS servers from a list (which you can alter
and save as an .ini file), calculates the average time (it polls them
at varying intervals) to get a correct reply. It also sends
random-generated FAKE names to see if the DNS server redirects the
lookups to ad/profiling/datamining pages. Then makes a table with the
results with the most reliable/fastest ones at the top.
It's a tiny 160KB portable program, and there is no malware
present at all. I've been using it ever since Gibson announced the
beta test some 9 years ago.
No, a DNS server will NOT interpret a dozen lookups with
random intervals between them as a DOS attack.
The fastest server is usually your ISP's. Don't forget to add
the IP addresses to the list if and when you finally decide it's not
"black magic" and actually run it.
HTH
[]'s
Can you suggest how to run it on an Apple iMac?
Yes, sure. Start by reading the very first sentence on the
homepage.
Other people could research here:

https://tekrider.net/pages/david-brooks-stalker.php

Which explains why you are asking.
[]'s
--
Don't be evil - Google 2004
We have a new policy - Google 2012
BurfordTJustice
2018-04-08 14:01:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
dance nanus dance....

LOL





"Shadow" <***@dow.br> wrote in message news:***@4ax.com...
: On Sun, 8 Apr 2018 11:21:11 +0100, "David B."
: <***@nomail.afraid.org> wrote:
:
: >On 08/04/2018 11:17, Shadow wrote:
: >> On Sat, 07 Apr 2018 19:51:00 -0500, Char Jackson <***@none.invalid>
: >> wrote:
: >>
: >>> On Sun, 8 Apr 2018 06:40:07 +0800, "Mr. Man-wai Chang"
: >>> <***@gmail.com> wrote:
: >>>
: >>>> On 7/4/2018 11:40 PM, Libor Striz wrote:
: >>>>>
: >>>>> I do not remember anybody saying you need that tool.
: >>>>> Tools are usually made to make things convenient, not possible.
: >>>>
: >>>> I really wanna know how that Gibsons DNSbench works. Anyway, maybe
you
: >>>> are not that interested! :)
: >>>
: >>> There's no magic involved in such a program. What question(s) do you
: >>> have? If you know any programming languages, you can easily write your
: >>> own.
: >>
: >> According to his webpage, he's a programmer. Currently
: >> unemployed. Well, unemployed last time I visited it, some years ago.
: >> Hence my insinuations that he is either trolling (notice the
: >> off-topic groups he keeps adding to the follow-up and the completely
: >> off topic "issues") or has mental issues. Probably both.
: >>
: >> To MWC:
: >>
: >> DNSBench polls DNS servers from a list (which you can alter
: >> and save as an .ini file), calculates the average time (it polls them
: >> at varying intervals) to get a correct reply. It also sends
: >> random-generated FAKE names to see if the DNS server redirects the
: >> lookups to ad/profiling/datamining pages. Then makes a table with the
: >> results with the most reliable/fastest ones at the top.
: >> It's a tiny 160KB portable program, and there is no malware
: >> present at all. I've been using it ever since Gibson announced the
: >> beta test some 9 years ago.
: >> No, a DNS server will NOT interpret a dozen lookups with
: >> random intervals between them as a DOS attack.
: >> The fastest server is usually your ISP's. Don't forget to add
: >> the IP addresses to the list if and when you finally decide it's not
: >> "black magic" and actually run it.
: >> HTH
: >> []'s
: >
: >
: >Can you suggest how to run it on an Apple iMac?
:
: Yes, sure. Start by reading the very first sentence on the
: homepage.
: Other people could research here:
:
: https://tekrider.net/pages/david-brooks-stalker.php
:
: Which explains why you are asking.
: []'s
: --
: Don't be evil - Google 2004
: We have a new policy - Google 2012
David B.
2018-04-08 21:30:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Shadow
On Sun, 8 Apr 2018 11:21:11 +0100, "David B."
[....]
Post by Shadow
Post by David B.
Post by Shadow
DNSBench polls DNS servers from a list (which you can alter
and save as an .ini file), calculates the average time (it polls them
at varying intervals) to get a correct reply. It also sends
random-generated FAKE names to see if the DNS server redirects the
lookups to ad/profiling/datamining pages. Then makes a table with the
results with the most reliable/fastest ones at the top.
It's a tiny 160KB portable program, and there is no malware
present at all. I've been using it ever since Gibson announced the
beta test some 9 years ago.
No, a DNS server will NOT interpret a dozen lookups with
random intervals between them as a DOS attack.
The fastest server is usually your ISP's. Don't forget to add
the IP addresses to the list if and when you finally decide it's not
"black magic" and actually run it.
HTH
[]'s
Can you suggest how to run it on an Apple iMac?
Yes, sure. Start by reading the very first sentence on the
homepage.
"A unique, comprehensive, accurate & free Windows (and Linux/Wine)
utility to determine the exact performance of local and remote DNS
nameservers . . ."


https://www.grc.com/dns/benchmark.htm
Caver1
2018-04-08 21:36:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David B.
Post by Shadow
On Sun, 8 Apr 2018 11:21:11 +0100, "David B."
[....]
Post by Shadow
Post by David B.
Post by Shadow
DNSBench polls DNS servers from a list (which you can alter
and save as an .ini file), calculates the average time (it polls them
at varying intervals) to get a correct reply. It also sends
random-generated FAKE names to see if the DNS server redirects the
lookups to ad/profiling/datamining pages. Then makes a table with the
results with the most reliable/fastest ones at the top.
It's a tiny 160KB portable program, and there is no malware
present at all. I've been using it ever since Gibson announced the
beta test some 9 years ago.
No, a DNS server will NOT interpret a dozen lookups with
random intervals between them as a DOS attack.
The fastest server is usually your ISP's. Don't forget to add
the IP addresses to the list if and when you finally decide it's not
"black magic" and actually run it.
HTH
[]'s
Can you suggest how to run it on an Apple iMac?
Yes, sure. Start by reading the very first sentence on the
homepage.
"A unique, comprehensive, accurate & free Windows (and Linux/Wine)
utility to determine the exact performance of local and remote DNS
nameservers . . ."
https://www.grc.com/dns/benchmark.htm
For linux-Namebench
--
Caver1
Rene Lamontagne
2018-04-08 21:48:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David B.
Post by Char Jackson
On Sun, 8 Apr 2018 06:40:07 +0800, "Mr. Man-wai Chang"
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Libor Striz
I do not remember anybody saying you need that tool.
Tools are usually made to make things convenient, not possible.
I really wanna know how that Gibsons DNSbench works. Anyway, maybe you
are not that interested! :)
There's no magic involved in such a program. What question(s) do you
have? If you know any programming languages, you can easily write your
own.
    According to his webpage, he's a programmer. Currently
unemployed. Well, unemployed last time I visited it, some years ago.
    Hence my insinuations that he is either trolling (notice the
off-topic groups he keeps adding to the follow-up and the completely
off topic "issues") or has mental issues. Probably both.
    DNSBench polls DNS servers from a list (which you can alter
and save as an .ini file), calculates the average time (it polls them
at varying intervals) to get a correct reply. It also sends
random-generated FAKE names to see if the DNS server redirects the
lookups to ad/profiling/datamining pages. Then makes a table with the
results with the most reliable/fastest ones at the top.
    It's a tiny 160KB portable program, and there is no malware
present at all. I've been using it ever since Gibson announced the
beta test some 9 years ago.
    No, a DNS server will NOT interpret  a dozen lookups with
random intervals between them as a DOS attack.
    The fastest server is usually your ISP's. Don't forget to add
the IP addresses to the list if and when you finally decide it's not
"black magic" and actually run it.
    HTH
    []'s
Can you suggest how to run it on an Apple iMac?
Whats an apple imac?
Paul
2018-04-08 22:00:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Rene Lamontagne
Post by David B.
Post by Shadow
Post by Char Jackson
On Sun, 8 Apr 2018 06:40:07 +0800, "Mr. Man-wai Chang"
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Libor Striz
I do not remember anybody saying you need that tool.
Tools are usually made to make things convenient, not possible.
I really wanna know how that Gibsons DNSbench works. Anyway, maybe you
are not that interested! :)
There's no magic involved in such a program. What question(s) do you
have? If you know any programming languages, you can easily write your
own.
According to his webpage, he's a programmer. Currently
unemployed. Well, unemployed last time I visited it, some years ago.
Hence my insinuations that he is either trolling (notice the
off-topic groups he keeps adding to the follow-up and the completely
off topic "issues") or has mental issues. Probably both.
DNSBench polls DNS servers from a list (which you can alter
and save as an .ini file), calculates the average time (it polls them
at varying intervals) to get a correct reply. It also sends
random-generated FAKE names to see if the DNS server redirects the
lookups to ad/profiling/datamining pages. Then makes a table with the
results with the most reliable/fastest ones at the top.
It's a tiny 160KB portable program, and there is no malware
present at all. I've been using it ever since Gibson announced the
beta test some 9 years ago.
No, a DNS server will NOT interpret a dozen lookups with
random intervals between them as a DOS attack.
The fastest server is usually your ISP's. Don't forget to add
the IP addresses to the list if and when you finally decide it's not
"black magic" and actually run it.
HTH
[]'s
Can you suggest how to run it on an Apple iMac?
Whats an apple imac?
By repeated inference, it's a computer that doesn't run stuff.

Forcing you to feel "left out" :-)

Of course, if you owned an Apple imac and you hung out in
an Apple group, then magically, *every* discussion topic would
run on your computer. And then you could ask questions such
as "How to run it on an IBM PC?" or "Will that run on my toaster?".

And so on.

Paul
David B.
2018-04-08 22:09:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Paul
Post by Rene Lamontagne
Post by David B.
Post by Char Jackson
On Sun, 8 Apr 2018 06:40:07 +0800, "Mr. Man-wai Chang"
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Libor Striz
I do not remember anybody saying you need that tool.
Tools are usually made to make things convenient, not possible.
I really wanna know how that Gibsons DNSbench works. Anyway, maybe you
are not that interested! :)
There's no magic involved in such a program. What question(s) do you
have? If you know any programming languages, you can easily write your
own.
    According to his webpage, he's a programmer. Currently
unemployed. Well, unemployed last time I visited it, some years ago.
    Hence my insinuations that he is either trolling (notice the
off-topic groups he keeps adding to the follow-up and the completely
off topic "issues") or has mental issues. Probably both.
    DNSBench polls DNS servers from a list (which you can alter
and save as an .ini file), calculates the average time (it polls them
at varying intervals) to get a correct reply. It also sends
random-generated FAKE names to see if the DNS server redirects the
lookups to ad/profiling/datamining pages. Then makes a table with the
results with the most reliable/fastest ones at the top.
    It's a tiny 160KB portable program, and there is no malware
present at all. I've been using it ever since Gibson announced the
beta test some 9 years ago.
    No, a DNS server will NOT interpret  a dozen lookups with
random intervals between them as a DOS attack.
    The fastest server is usually your ISP's. Don't forget to add
the IP addresses to the list if and when you finally decide it's not
"black magic" and actually run it.
    HTH
    []'s
Can you suggest how to run it on an Apple iMac?
Whats an apple imac?
By repeated inference, it's a computer that doesn't run stuff.
Forcing you to feel "left out" :-)
Of course, if you owned an Apple imac and you hung out in
an Apple group, then magically, *every* discussion topic would
run on your computer. And then you could ask questions such
as "How to run it on an IBM PC?" or "Will that run on my toaster?".
And so on.
   Paul
You are a wag, Paul! ;-)
Rene Lamontagne
2018-04-08 22:34:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Paul
Post by Rene Lamontagne
Post by David B.
Post by Char Jackson
On Sun, 8 Apr 2018 06:40:07 +0800, "Mr. Man-wai Chang"
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Libor Striz
I do not remember anybody saying you need that tool.
Tools are usually made to make things convenient, not possible.
I really wanna know how that Gibsons DNSbench works. Anyway, maybe you
are not that interested! :)
There's no magic involved in such a program. What question(s) do you
have? If you know any programming languages, you can easily write your
own.
    According to his webpage, he's a programmer. Currently
unemployed. Well, unemployed last time I visited it, some years ago.
    Hence my insinuations that he is either trolling (notice the
off-topic groups he keeps adding to the follow-up and the completely
off topic "issues") or has mental issues. Probably both.
    DNSBench polls DNS servers from a list (which you can alter
and save as an .ini file), calculates the average time (it polls them
at varying intervals) to get a correct reply. It also sends
random-generated FAKE names to see if the DNS server redirects the
lookups to ad/profiling/datamining pages. Then makes a table with the
results with the most reliable/fastest ones at the top.
    It's a tiny 160KB portable program, and there is no malware
present at all. I've been using it ever since Gibson announced the
beta test some 9 years ago.
    No, a DNS server will NOT interpret  a dozen lookups with
random intervals between them as a DOS attack.
    The fastest server is usually your ISP's. Don't forget to add
the IP addresses to the list if and when you finally decide it's not
"black magic" and actually run it.
    HTH
    []'s
Can you suggest how to run it on an Apple iMac?
Whats an apple imac?
By repeated inference, it's a computer that doesn't run stuff.
Forcing you to feel "left out" :-)
Of course, if you owned an Apple imac and you hung out in
an Apple group, then magically, *every* discussion topic would
run on your computer. And then you could ask questions such
as "How to run it on an IBM PC?" or "Will that run on my toaster?".
And so on.
   Paul
Thanks Paul for the clarification, I thought it was something you ate! :-)

Rene
David B.
2018-04-08 22:07:51 UTC
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On 08/04/2018 22:48, Rene Lamontagne wrote:
[.....]
Post by Rene Lamontagne
Whats an apple imac?
It's one of the very best computers one can buy! ;-)

Details here:- https://www.apple.com/imac/

"Faster and more powerful than ever, iMac is now equipped with
seventh-generation Intel Core i5 and i7 processors and the latest
high-performance graphics. Storage kicks into high gear as well, with
the speedy and spacious Fusion Drive now available in standard
configurations of both the 27-inch and 21.5-inch Retina models. So you
can do everything you love to do on iMac. All at maximum velocity."
Bobbie Sellers
2018-04-08 22:22:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David B.
[.....]
Post by Rene Lamontagne
Whats an apple imac?
It's one of the very best computers one can buy! ;-)
Details here:- https://www.apple.com/imac/
"Faster and more powerful than ever, iMac is now equipped with
seventh-generation Intel Core i5 and i7 processors and the latest
high-performance graphics. Storage kicks into high gear as well, with
the speedy and spacious Fusion Drive now available in standard
configurations of both the 27-inch and 21.5-inch Retina models. So you
can do everything you love to do on iMac. All at maximum velocity."
Sadly it seldom runs GNU/Linux though some distribution
are setup to look very much like it. But apple imac is off topic
here unless you have read the instruction and successfully installed
GNU/Linux of the Ubuntu distribution on it.
A well setup Apple computer is very expensive and has been
from the time of the Apple 1 right down to the present even when
used.
I personally prefer Dell Latitude computerd and maybe the
higher priced Precision model but used in any case.

bliss
--
bliss dash SF 4 ever at dslextreme dot com
Paul
2018-04-08 22:37:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Bobbie Sellers
Post by David B.
[.....]
Post by Rene Lamontagne
Whats an apple imac?
It's one of the very best computers one can buy! ;-)
Details here:- https://www.apple.com/imac/
"Faster and more powerful than ever, iMac is now equipped with
seventh-generation Intel Core i5 and i7 processors and the latest
high-performance graphics. Storage kicks into high gear as well, with
the speedy and spacious Fusion Drive now available in standard
configurations of both the 27-inch and 21.5-inch Retina models. So you
can do everything you love to do on iMac. All at maximum velocity."
Sadly it seldom runs GNU/Linux though some distribution
are setup to look very much like it. But apple imac is off topic
here unless you have read the instruction and successfully installed
GNU/Linux of the Ubuntu distribution on it.
A well setup Apple computer is very expensive and has been
from the time of the Apple 1 right down to the present even when
used.
I personally prefer Dell Latitude computerd and maybe the
higher priced Precision model but used in any case.
bliss
A Mac will run Linux. I have a PowerPC distro disc that
boots on an old Mac G4. It has a slightly different boot
loader I forget the name of, that deals with OF.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_Firmware

And now that Apple is threatening to change the processor
once again on their machines, the process of making a
distro that runs on the platform, will begin all over again.

Paul
Melzzzzz
2018-04-08 23:01:36 UTC
Reply
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Post by Paul
And now that Apple is threatening to change the processor
once again on their machines, the process of making a
distro that runs on the platform, will begin all over again.
What processor they have in mind now?
Post by Paul
Paul
--
press any key to continue or any other to quit...
Rene Lamontagne
2018-04-08 23:23:24 UTC
Reply
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Post by Melzzzzz
Post by Paul
And now that Apple is threatening to change the processor
once again on their machines, the process of making a
distro that runs on the platform, will begin all over again.
What processor they have in mind now?
Post by Paul
Paul
From all the stories I've read they will be doing their own chips
Whether they will have there own Fab is not clear, They are talking 2020
release.

Rene
Paul
2018-04-08 23:58:25 UTC
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Post by Melzzzzz
Post by Paul
And now that Apple is threatening to change the processor
once again on their machines, the process of making a
distro that runs on the platform, will begin all over again.
What processor they have in mind now?
It might be ARM-like.

https://www.theverge.com/2018/4/3/17191986/apple-intel-cpu-processor-design-competition

The thing is, Apple has a half-hearted interest in Desktops
right now, and changing the processor might align with
a move to smaller platforms. No more cylindrical
tin cans, or even conventional looking desktop boxen
with Xeons inside, is just a guess on my part.

Intel doesn't make "low enough power" stuff to suit
Apple. So, Apple will do the job itself. Now, in a
past era "IBM didn't make fast enough PPCs, so
we'll go to Intel for speed". This time, it's about
power.

I'm not convinced Intel is being dumped because
"it doesn't have enough cores". Intel has that
covered. But it's the lower power future that Apple
is trying to cover off. Intel does try to mod things,
such as adding "S0ix" power states. But the attempts
by Intel to compete on power, just aren't getting to
where Apple might want them.

And the thing is, the laws of physics haven't been
repealed, so I fail to see how this effort will
bear any fruit except "processors that stink".
As a former Apple user, I know what that's like :-/
(I've had a total of three Macs over the years, the
first one being a 50MHz PPC. My newest Mac runs
at 1.25GHz. I won't be buying any more of them,
as my old software collection won't run.)

Paul
Melzzzzz
2018-04-09 00:39:54 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Paul
Post by Melzzzzz
Post by Paul
And now that Apple is threatening to change the processor
once again on their machines, the process of making a
distro that runs on the platform, will begin all over again.
What processor they have in mind now?
It might be ARM-like.
https://www.theverge.com/2018/4/3/17191986/apple-intel-cpu-processor-design-competition
The thing is, Apple has a half-hearted interest in Desktops
right now, and changing the processor might align with
a move to smaller platforms. No more cylindrical
tin cans, or even conventional looking desktop boxen
with Xeons inside, is just a guess on my part.
Hm, giving up on desktop is more like admitting defeat.
Post by Paul
As a former Apple user, I know what that's like :-/
(I've had a total of three Macs over the years, the
first one being a 50MHz PPC. My newest Mac runs
at 1.25GHz. I won't be buying any more of them,
as my old software collection won't run.)
I never found a reason to use Mac. Lot of people buy them because of
elitism, but not me ;) What bothers me most is that their hardware is
obsolete and they charge too much for it. That is for desktops. Perhaps,
move to their designed ARM, will attract some users as elitists usually
don't like x86 ;p
Post by Paul
Paul
--
press any key to continue or any other to quit...
Sn!pe
2018-04-08 22:40:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Bobbie Sellers
Post by David B.
[.....]
Post by Rene Lamontagne
Whats an apple imac?
It's one of the very best computers one can buy! ;-)
Details here:- https://www.apple.com/imac/
"Faster and more powerful than ever, iMac is now equipped with
seventh-generation Intel Core i5 and i7 processors and the latest
high-performance graphics. Storage kicks into high gear as well, with
the speedy and spacious Fusion Drive now available in standard
configurations of both the 27-inch and 21.5-inch Retina models. So you
can do everything you love to do on iMac. All at maximum velocity."
Sadly it seldom runs GNU/Linux though some distribution
are setup to look very much like it. But apple imac is off topic
here unless you have read the instruction and successfully installed
GNU/Linux of the Ubuntu distribution on it.
A well setup Apple computer is very expensive and has been
from the time of the Apple 1 right down to the present even when
used.
I personally prefer Dell Latitude computerd and maybe the
higher priced Precision model but used in any case.
bliss
[OT]

PMFJI

1. I am not reading this thread in a 'Doze group.

2. I run both 'Doze and Ubuntu in VMs on my iMac;
also a second instance of Mac OS, all concurrently
with the Mac OS host instance. My iMac is powerful
enough to do all of that and do it well.

I am not trying to be controversial here,
it's just to dispel a misconception or two.
--
^Ï^. Sn!pe <***@gmail.com>

My pet rock Gordon just is.
Sjouke Burry
2018-04-08 22:23:52 UTC
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Post by Rene Lamontagne
Post by David B.
Post by Shadow
Post by Char Jackson
On Sun, 8 Apr 2018 06:40:07 +0800, "Mr. Man-wai Chang"
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Libor Striz
I do not remember anybody saying you need that tool.
Tools are usually made to make things convenient, not possible.
I really wanna know how that Gibsons DNSbench works. Anyway, maybe you
are not that interested! :)
There's no magic involved in such a program. What question(s) do you
have? If you know any programming languages, you can easily write your
own.
According to his webpage, he's a programmer. Currently
unemployed. Well, unemployed last time I visited it, some years ago.
Hence my insinuations that he is either trolling (notice the
off-topic groups he keeps adding to the follow-up and the completely
off topic "issues") or has mental issues. Probably both.
DNSBench polls DNS servers from a list (which you can alter
and save as an .ini file), calculates the average time (it polls them
at varying intervals) to get a correct reply. It also sends
random-generated FAKE names to see if the DNS server redirects the
lookups to ad/profiling/datamining pages. Then makes a table with the
results with the most reliable/fastest ones at the top.
It's a tiny 160KB portable program, and there is no malware
present at all. I've been using it ever since Gibson announced the
beta test some 9 years ago.
No, a DNS server will NOT interpret a dozen lookups with
random intervals between them as a DOS attack.
The fastest server is usually your ISP's. Don't forget to add
the IP addresses to the list if and when you finally decide it's not
"black magic" and actually run it.
HTH
[]'s
Can you suggest how to run it on an Apple iMac?
Whats an apple imac?
A nerdy plaything?
Mr. Man-wai Chang
2018-04-08 10:51:40 UTC
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Post by Shadow
DNSBench polls DNS servers from a list (which you can alter
and save as an .ini file), calculates the average time (it polls them
at varying intervals) to get a correct reply. It also sends
random-generated FAKE names to see if the DNS server redirects the
lookups to ad/profiling/datamining pages. Then makes a table with the
results with the most reliable/fastest ones at the top.
It's a tiny 160KB portable program, and there is no malware
present at all. I've been using it ever since Gibson announced the
beta test some 9 years ago.
No, a DNS server will NOT interpret a dozen lookups with
random intervals between them as a DOS attack.
The fastest server is usually your ISP's. Don't forget to add
the IP addresses to the list if and when you finally decide it's not
"black magic" and actually run it.
I understand.
--
@~@ Remain silent! Drink, Blink, Stretch! Live long and prosper!!
/ v \ Simplicity is Beauty!
/( _ )\ May the Force and farces be with you!
^ ^ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.39.3
不借貸! 不詐騙! 不賭錢! 不援交! 不打交! 不打劫! 不自殺! 不求神! 請考慮綜援
(CSSA):
http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
Libor Striz
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Libor Striz
I do not remember anybody saying you need that tool.
Tools are usually made to make things convenient, not possible.
I really wanna know how that Gibsons DNSbench works. Anyway, maybe you
are not that interested! :)
There is no magic there, usual and less usual UDP or TCP DNS
queries on port 53, with the timing and stat evaluation.
--
Libor Striz aka Poutnik ( a pilgrim/wanderer/wayfarer)


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
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Mr. Man-wai Chang
2018-04-07 15:07:03 UTC
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Post by Libor Striz
You do not need a special tool to ping servers.
But pinging DNS servers is not querying DNS servers.
The ping requests do not even reach DNS services.
Anyway, is that special tool doing the same thing as the following link?

https://arstechnica.com/civis/viewtopic.php?f=20&t=922246

*** quote ****
$ time nslookup www.arstechnica.com 1.2.3.4
Server: a.com
Address: 1.2.3.4

Non-authoritative answer:
Name: www.arstechnica.com
Address: 216.110.36.107


real 0m0.24s
user 0m0.00s
sys 0m0.02s
*** quote ****
--
@~@ Remain silent! Drink, Blink, Stretch! Live long and prosper!!
/ v \ Simplicity is Beauty!
/( _ )\ May the Force and farces be with you!
^ ^ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.39.3
不借貸! 不詐騙! 不賭錢! 不援交! 不打交! 不打劫! 不自殺! 不求神! 請考慮綜援
(CSSA):
http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
Libor Striz
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Libor Striz
You do not need a special tool to ping servers.
But pinging DNS servers is not querying DNS servers.
The ping requests do not even reach DNS services.
Anyway, is that special tool doing the same thing as the following link?
https://arstechnica.com/civis/viewtopic.php?f=20&t=922246
*** quote ****
$ time nslookup www.arstechnica.com 1.2.3.4
Server: a.com
Address: 1.2.3.4
Name: www.arstechnica.com
Address: 216.110.36.107
real 0m0.24s
user 0m0.00s
sys 0m0.02s
*** quote ****
Now,
do it for both cached and noncached lookups,
For a properly sized statistical lookup sample,
for a hundred of servers
and present it in overview form.
--
Libor Striz aka Poutnik ( a pilgrim/wanderer/wayfarer)


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
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Shadow
2018-04-07 17:10:42 UTC
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On Sat, 7 Apr 2018 23:07:03 +0800, "Mr. Man-wai Chang"
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Libor Striz
You do not need a special tool to ping servers.
You don't need legs to walk, but it's hard on your hands.
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Libor Striz
But pinging DNS servers is not querying DNS servers.
The ping requests do not even reach DNS services.
Anyway, is that special tool doing the same thing as the following link?
<CUT_OFF_TOPIC_LINK>
No, but I can understand that the MASSIVE size of the freeware
might be a deterrent.

https://www.grc.com/dns/benchmark.htm

Over ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY THOUSAND BYTES.
If you want, I can put it on a DVD and mail it to you.
You have been cleared to receive mail in the asylum, I presume
?
[]'s
--
Don't be evil - Google 2004
We have a new policy - Google 2012
Mr. Man-wai Chang
2018-04-07 22:42:35 UTC
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Post by Shadow
No, but I can understand that the MASSIVE size of the freeware
might be a deterrent.
https://www.grc.com/dns/benchmark.htm
Over ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY THOUSAND BYTES.
If you want, I can put it on a DVD and mail it to you.
You have been cleared to receive mail in the asylum, I presume
?
GRC is a reputable website, I suppose, at least it used to be.
--
@~@ Remain silent! Drink, Blink, Stretch! Live long and prosper!!
/ v \ Simplicity is Beauty!
/( _ )\ May the Force and farces be with you!
^ ^ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.39.3
不借貸! 不詐騙! 不賭錢! 不援交! 不打交! 不打劫! 不自殺! 不求神! 請考慮綜援
(CSSA):
http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
Rene Lamontagne
2018-04-07 23:31:01 UTC
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Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
    No, but I can understand that the MASSIVE size of the freeware
might be a deterrent.
https://www.grc.com/dns/benchmark.htm
    Over ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY THOUSAND BYTES.
    If you want, I can put it on a DVD and mail it to you.
    You have been cleared to receive mail in the asylum, I presume
?
GRC is a reputable website, I suppose, at least it used to be.
Still is.

Rene
Mr. Man-wai Chang
2018-04-08 03:58:19 UTC
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Post by Rene Lamontagne
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
GRC is a reputable website, I suppose, at least it used to be.
Still is.
Sith needs a new apprentice. Drive him to the Dark Side of the Force... :)
--
@~@ Remain silent! Drink, Blink, Stretch! Live long and prosper!!
/ v \ Simplicity is Beauty!
/( _ )\ May the Force and farces be with you!
^ ^ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.39.3
不借貸! 不詐騙! 不賭錢! 不援交! 不打交! 不打劫! 不自殺! 不求神! 請考慮綜援
(CSSA):
http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
Shadow
2018-04-07 10:53:23 UTC
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On Sat, 7 Apr 2018 18:39:30 +0800, "Mr. Man-wai Chang"
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
 Download Steve Gibsons DNSbench and run your own tests for your
location, It varies by location and whats fastest for me may not be fast
for you.
You don't need a special tool to test pinging DNS servers?
Like I said, fairies and black magic are Man Pong Chew's areas
of expertise. And steadily increasing the number of off-topic
newsgroups he spams and trolls.
At least Bouffant du Jour has the excuse of being both
ignorant and terrified.
[]'s
--
Don't be evil - Google 2004
We have a new policy - Google 2012
Mr. Man-wai Chang
2018-04-07 15:03:21 UTC
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Post by Shadow
Like I said, fairies and black magic are Man Pong Chew's areas
of expertise. And steadily increasing the number of off-topic
newsgroups he spams and trolls.
At least Bouffant du Jour has the excuse of being both
ignorant and terrified.
There are many simple ways to do things. A custom or special tool only
means convenience.
--
@~@ Remain silent! Drink, Blink, Stretch! Live long and prosper!!
/ v \ Simplicity is Beauty!
/( _ )\ May the Force and farces be with you!
^ ^ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.39.3
不借貸! 不詐騙! 不賭錢! 不援交! 不打交! 不打劫! 不自殺! 不求神! 請考慮綜援
(CSSA):
http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
Libor Striz
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
There are many simple ways to do things. A custom or special tool only
means convenience.
Simple ways are often extensive ways. The school example are
sorting algorithms.
Simple ones are N^2 slow,
complex ones are N*log N fast.

Btw, I like dig more than nslookup,
especially for batch lookups.
--
Libor Striz aka Poutnik ( a pilgrim/wanderer/wayfarer)


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
http://usenet.sinaapp.com/
Mr. Man-wai Chang
2018-04-07 22:44:06 UTC
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Post by Libor Striz
Simple ones are N^2 slow,
complex ones are N*log N fast.
Until we know how Gibsons DNSbench works....
Post by Libor Striz
Btw, I like dig more than nslookup,
especially for batch lookups.
I am also learning... :)
--
@~@ Remain silent! Drink, Blink, Stretch! Live long and prosper!!
/ v \ Simplicity is Beauty!
/( _ )\ May the Force and farces be with you!
^ ^ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.39.3
不借貸! 不詐騙! 不賭錢! 不援交! 不打交! 不打劫! 不自殺! 不求神! 請考慮綜援
(CSSA):
http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
Libor Striz
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Libor Striz
Simple ones are N^2 slow,
complex ones are N*log N fast.
Until we know how Gibsons DNSbench works....
an interesting jump in logic.

There is no magic, just the automated use of DNS query protocol.
--
Libor Striz aka Poutnik ( a pilgrim/wanderer/wayfarer)


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
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Mr. Man-wai Chang
2018-04-08 03:56:02 UTC
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Post by Libor Striz
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Libor Striz
Simple ones are N^2 slow,
complex ones are N*log N fast.
Until we know how Gibsons DNSbench works....
an interesting jump in logic.
How could you measure an algorithm's performance without knowing what it
does? How could you know whether the algorithm was coded properly?
How... I don't wanna continue. :)
Post by Libor Striz
There is no magic, just the automated use of DNS query protocol.
There are factors to ignore! Anyway, later!
--
@~@ Remain silent! Drink, Blink, Stretch! Live long and prosper!!
/ v \ Simplicity is Beauty!
/( _ )\ May the Force and farces be with you!
^ ^ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.39.3
不借貸! 不詐騙! 不賭錢! 不援交! 不打交! 不打劫! 不自殺! 不求神! 請考慮綜援
(CSSA):
http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
Libor Striz
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Libor Striz
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Libor Striz
Simple ones are N^2 slow,
complex ones are N*log N fast.
Until we know how Gibsons DNSbench works....
an interesting jump in logic.
How could you measure an algorithm's performance without knowing what it
does? How could you know whether the algorithm was coded properly?
How... I don't wanna continue. :)
Sorting algorithms are known well :-)
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Libor Striz
There is no magic, just the automated use of DNS query protocol.
There are factors to ignore! Anyway, later!
.. and there are factors not to ignore.
The cache status is essential.
One number is no number.
--
Libor Striz aka Poutnik ( a pilgrim/wanderer/wayfarer)


----Android NewsGroup Reader----
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Mr. Man-wai Chang
2018-04-08 10:54:03 UTC
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Post by Libor Striz
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
How could you measure an algorithm's performance without knowing what it
does? How could you know whether the algorithm was coded properly?
How... I don't wanna continue. :)
Sorting algorithms are known well :-)
You need to find out what sorting algorithm! Anyway, I am NOT a
mathematics person. I will leave it to you, King of Maths? :)
--
@~@ Remain silent! Drink, Blink, Stretch! Live long and prosper!!
/ v \ Simplicity is Beauty!
/( _ )\ May the Force and farces be with you!
^ ^ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.39.3
不借貸! 不詐騙! 不賭錢! 不援交! 不打交! 不打劫! 不自殺! 不求神! 請考慮綜援
(CSSA):
http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
Libor Striz
1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC
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Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Libor Striz
Sorting algorithms are known well :-)
You need to find out what sorting algorithm!
In fact not, it is enough to know the algorithm family, it it uses
a naive approach or not.
--
Libor Striz aka Poutnik ( a pilgrim/wanderer/wayfarer)


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Bobbie Sellers
2018-04-08 22:29:18 UTC
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Post by David E. Ross
Post by Rene Lamontagne
Seeing we are on the DNS subject I have a question. When I run Gibsons
DNSbench I get this one as the fastest, listed at the top.
192.168.0.1
Can this be used as a DNS server as the others can?
I don't recall it being listed in past tests done in the last year or two.
Rene
All IP addresses in the range 192.168.0.0 - 192.168.255.255 (and a few
other ranges) are "private". That means they are local to local-area
networks (LANs). The same IP addresses exits many times in different
LANs. Thus, it cannot possibly be a true DNS.
No but the fastest DNS you can setup is on your own
machine using Bind, a reverse lookup DNS server. Below is
some information on doing so.
<https://help.ubuntu.com/lts/serverguide/dns-configuration.html>

Do you know that cloudflare is the name of a specific
malware and that this 1.1.1.1 is data miner?

bliss -- too stupid lately to setup a Fully Qualified Domain
Name and so unable to set up my own rlDNS server. Might be brighter
tomorrow.
--
bliss dash SF 4 ever at dslextreme dot com
Geoff Muldoon
2018-04-08 23:35:54 UTC
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Post by Bobbie Sellers
Do you know that cloudflare is the name of a specific
malware and that this 1.1.1.1 is data miner?
Incorrect. Cloudflare is a corporation/product, specialising in web
mirroring and caching. It may well be that some of their mirrored
client sites have malware, But I believe they are pretty good with
takedowns when they find this. And sure, it's feasible that they are
doing some level of background data mining, but probably less so than
Google, and no one call them "malware".

GM
Bobbie Sellers
2018-04-08 23:41:49 UTC
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Post by Geoff Muldoon
Post by Bobbie Sellers
Do you know that cloudflare is the name of a specific
malware and that this 1.1.1.1 is data miner?
Incorrect. Cloudflare is a corporation/product, specialising in web
mirroring and caching. It may well be that some of their mirrored
client sites have malware, But I believe they are pretty good with
takedowns when they find this. And sure, it's feasible that they are
doing some level of background data mining, but probably less so than
Google, and no one call them "malware".
GM
Then take a look a cloudflare virus or cloudflare virus in
your search engine where you will find plenty of complaints or just go
to:<https://thehackernews.com/2017/02/cloudflare-vulnerability.html>

bliss
--
bliss dash SF 4 ever at dslextreme dot com
Geoff Muldoon
2018-04-08 23:54:21 UTC
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Post by Bobbie Sellers
Post by Geoff Muldoon
Post by Bobbie Sellers
Do you know that cloudflare is the name of a specific
malware and that this 1.1.1.1 is data miner?
Incorrect. Cloudflare is a corporation/product, specialising in web
mirroring and caching. It may well be that some of their mirrored
client sites have malware, But I believe they are pretty good with
takedowns when they find this. And sure, it's feasible that they are
doing some level of background data mining, but probably less so than
Google, and no one call them "malware".
GM
Then take a look a cloudflare virus or cloudflare virus in
your search engine where you will find plenty of complaints or just go
to:<https://thehackernews.com/2017/02/cloudflare-vulnerability.html>
Yes, I know about the Cloudbleed variant of Heartbleed that was around
about a year ago. Yes, I know that Cloudflare as a product has
occasionally had vulnerabilities that needed to be patched, and also
that Cloudflare was not the only product affected by Cloudbleed.
Microsoft also (all too regularly unfortunately) has been found to have
vulnerabilities. Are you saying that MS per se is malware too?

GM
Shadow
2018-04-09 00:34:53 UTC
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On Mon, 9 Apr 2018 09:54:21 +1000, Geoff Muldoon
Post by Geoff Muldoon
Post by Bobbie Sellers
Post by Geoff Muldoon
Post by Bobbie Sellers
Do you know that cloudflare is the name of a specific
malware and that this 1.1.1.1 is data miner?
Incorrect. Cloudflare is a corporation/product, specialising in web
mirroring and caching. It may well be that some of their mirrored
client sites have malware, But I believe they are pretty good with
takedowns when they find this. And sure, it's feasible that they are
doing some level of background data mining, but probably less so than
Google, and no one call them "malware".
GM
Then take a look a cloudflare virus or cloudflare virus in
your search engine where you will find plenty of complaints or just go
to:<https://thehackernews.com/2017/02/cloudflare-vulnerability.html>
Yes, I know about the Cloudbleed variant of Heartbleed that was around
about a year ago. Yes, I know that Cloudflare as a product has
occasionally had vulnerabilities that needed to be patched, and also
that Cloudflare was not the only product affected by Cloudbleed.
Microsoft also (all too regularly unfortunately) has been found to have
vulnerabilities. Are you saying that MS per se is malware too?
GM
Are Microsoft products malware ?

Do they phone home ?
Do they track you by giving you a uniqueID ?
Do they serve up unwanted ads based on user profiling ?
Do they log program/media usage ?
Do they keep records of every file that's ever been on your
HD, even after you delete them ?
and etc

Dunno. <scratches head>.
That's a difficult question.
[]'s
--
Don't be evil - Google 2004
We have a new policy - Google 2012
Shadow
2018-04-05 21:50:08 UTC
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On Tue, 3 Apr 2018 14:12:06 +0800, "Mr. Man-wai Chang"
Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
<https://www.theverge.com/2018/4/1/17185732/cloudflare-dns-service-1-1-1-1>
Cloudflare is launching its own consumer DNS service today, on April
Fools’ Day, that promises to speed up your internet connection and help
keep it private.
Four ones 1.1.1.1
4/1
Launched on April 1
I can't believe people actually fell for the datamining
"service".
;)
[]'s

** Well, "man pu too" did, but that was predictable. He
believes in fairies and black magic.
--
Don't be evil - Google 2004
We have a new policy - Google 2012
Mr. Man-wai Chang
2018-04-08 10:57:22 UTC
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Post by Shadow
Four ones 1.1.1.1
4/1
Launched on April 1
I can't believe people actually fell for the datamining
"service".
How could you escape from your ISP and government? :)
Post by Shadow
** Well, "man pu too" did, but that was predictable. He
believes in fairies and black magic.
No, I just don't care and is UNABLE to care. I am just a freelance
pedestrian. ;)
--
@~@ Remain silent! Drink, Blink, Stretch! Live long and prosper!!
/ v \ Simplicity is Beauty!
/( _ )\ May the Force and farces be with you!
^ ^ (x86_64 Ubuntu 9.10) Linux 2.6.39.3
不借貸! 不詐騙! 不賭錢! 不援交! 不打交! 不打劫! 不自殺! 不求神! 請考慮綜援
(CSSA):
http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa
Caver1
2018-04-08 19:57:31 UTC
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Post by Mr. Man-wai Chang
Post by Shadow
Four ones 1.1.1.1
4/1
Launched on April 1
I can't believe people actually fell for the datamining
"service".
How could you escape from your ISP and government? :)
Post by Shadow
** Well, "man pu too" did, but that was predictable. He
believes in fairies and black magic.
No, I just don't care and is UNABLE to care. I am just a freelance
pedestrian. ;)
Here is an interesting article on this;

https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2018/04/how-to-keep-your-isps-nose-out-of-your-browser-history-with-encrypted-dns/

How to keep your ISP’s nose out of your browser history with encrypted DNS
--
Caver1
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