Discussion:
Install Excl 2003?
(too old to reply)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-04-16 12:07:38 UTC
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Please let me know how in the heck to install Excel 2003, as all M$
programs go thru the "activation" junk, and i need to re-install my
Excel 2003 and (somehow) "activate" it
Any suggestions extremely welcome.
Thanks.
Office 2003 predates online activation.
* NOT TRUE; see below.
You need the original installation software (CDROM or ISO) and the multi
digit key code which came with it. When you start the installation it
will ask you to enter the code - doesn't even need an Internet connection.
* Yes; BUT...it bitches and eXplicitly gives X number of uses if you do
not activate it.
I never activated my Office 2003 (installed from CD), and was never
prompted to do so - over some years of use. [XP machine.] I _was_
prompted for the key during installation, which I entered. I recently
installed 2003 on this [7-32] machine (using a different key: I have
two), and again was prompted for the key during installation, but saw
(and have seen) no mention of activation, or a limited number of uses.

Maybe there are different versions of Office 2003, some of which _do_
require activation?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

... the pleasure of the mind is an amazing thing. My life has been driven by
the satisfaction of curiosity. - Jeremy Paxman (being interviewed by Anne
Widdecombe), Radio Times, 2-8 July 2011.
SC Tom
2018-04-16 12:21:52 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Please let me know how in the heck to install Excel 2003, as all M$
programs go thru the "activation" junk, and i need to re-install my
Excel 2003 and (somehow) "activate" it
Any suggestions extremely welcome.
Thanks.
Office 2003 predates online activation.
* NOT TRUE; see below.
You need the original installation software (CDROM or ISO) and the multi
digit key code which came with it. When you start the installation it
will ask you to enter the code - doesn't even need an Internet connection.
* Yes; BUT...it bitches and eXplicitly gives X number of uses if you do
not activate it.
I never activated my Office 2003 (installed from CD), and was never
prompted to do so - over some years of use. [XP machine.] I _was_ prompted
for the key during installation, which I entered. I recently installed
2003 on this [7-32] machine (using a different key: I have two), and again
was prompted for the key during installation, but saw (and have seen) no
mention of activation, or a limited number of uses.
Maybe there are different versions of Office 2003, some of which _do_
require activation?
I agree with J.P. I use Word, Excel, and Outlook 2003, installed from the
Office Pro disc I bought way back when. I've had to re-install it over the
years/OS's without any activation requests, or any other problem (as long as
I enter the number correctly, LOL!). Even works fine on my Win10 machines.
--
SC Tom
Java Jive
2018-04-16 14:15:17 UTC
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Post by SC Tom
I agree with J.P. I use Word, Excel, and Outlook 2003, installed from
the Office Pro disc I bought way back when. I've had to re-install it
over the years/OS's without any activation requests, or any other
problem (as long as I enter the number correctly, LOL!). Even works fine
on my Win10 machines.
I'm quite surprised to hear this, because recently, as a hopeful
experiment, I tried installing Office 2000 on W7, and it wouldn't run.
I'm having to use Office 2010 instead, although for most things I'm
actually using LibreOffice.
Good Guy
2018-04-16 20:30:27 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Java Jive
Post by SC Tom
I agree with J.P. I use Word, Excel, and Outlook 2003, installed from
the Office Pro disc I bought way back when. I've had to re-install it
over the years/OS's without any activation requests, or any other
problem (as long as I enter the number correctly, LOL!). Even works
fine on my Win10 machines.
I'm quite surprised to hear this, because recently, as a hopeful
experiment, I tried installing Office 2000 on W7, and it wouldn't run.
I'm having to use Office 2010 instead, although for most things I'm
actually using LibreOffice.
2003 can run in Windows 10 but it crashes most often. I use 2016 but I
have used all version since 2003 and I have legal license to all of them.

What people don't know is that Employees of corporations can buy full
package for 9.95 bucks (can be £9.95 UKP or $9.95 USD). this is how
Microsoft is helping corporations and their employees. There is
absolutely no need to use cracks or some junk free software as suggested
by that Brazillian drug dealer.
Post by Java Jive
Post by SC Tom
/--- This email has been checked for viruses by
Windows Defender software.
//https://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/windows/comprehensive-security/
--
With over 600 million devices now running Windows 10, customer
satisfaction is higher than any previous version of windows.
Robert Baer
2018-04-17 04:21:39 UTC
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Post by Good Guy
Post by Java Jive
Post by SC Tom
I agree with J.P. I use Word, Excel, and Outlook 2003, installed from
the Office Pro disc I bought way back when. I've had to re-install it
over the years/OS's without any activation requests, or any other
problem (as long as I enter the number correctly, LOL!). Even works
fine on my Win10 machines.
I'm quite surprised to hear this, because recently, as a hopeful
experiment, I tried installing Office 2000 on W7, and it wouldn't run.
I'm having to use Office 2010 instead, although for most things I'm
actually using LibreOffice.
2003 can run in Windows 10 but it crashes most often. I use 2016 but I
have used all version since 2003 and I have legal license to all of them.
What people don't know is that Employees of corporations can buy full
package for 9.95 bucks (can be £9.95 UKP or $9.95 USD). this is how
Microsoft is helping corporations and their employees. There is
absolutely no need to use cracks or some junk free software as suggested
by that Brazillian drug dealer.
VERY generic and over-symplistik (sexist Miss-spelling on porpoise).
"Full package" of UNSPECIFIED software?
YOU are the ONLY ONE that has alluded to "junk" or "free" software or
"Brazillian" or "drug dealer".
Carpe Diem
2018-04-19 03:54:19 UTC
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Post by Java Jive
...
I'm quite surprised to hear this, because recently, as a hopeful
experiment, I tried installing Office 2000 on W7, and it wouldn't run.
I'm having to use Office 2010 instead, although for most things I'm
actually using LibreOffice.
Office 2003 and 2007 run fine on W7.
--
Groeten,
Carpe Diem
____
Make thinks as simple as possible, but not simpler.
(Albert Einstein)
Diesel
2018-05-14 01:56:54 UTC
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Post by Java Jive
Post by SC Tom
I agree with J.P. I use Word, Excel, and Outlook 2003, installed
from the Office Pro disc I bought way back when. I've had to
re-install it over the years/OS's without any activation
requests, or any other problem (as long as I enter the number
correctly, LOL!). Even works fine on my Win10 machines.
I'm quite surprised to hear this, because recently, as a hopeful
experiment, I tried installing Office 2000 on W7, and it wouldn't
run. I'm having to use Office 2010 instead, although for most
things I'm actually using LibreOffice.
What do you mean by wouldn't run? I was able to load office2000
professional edition with all the trimmings on a w7 64bit machine
without trouble. Works fine. Did you get a specific error message?

Are you sure your o2k media is in good shape?
--
To prevent yourself from being a victim of cyber
stalking, it's highly recommended you visit here:
https://tekrider.net/pages/david-brooks-stalker.php
===================================================
Oxymoron: Superette.
Robert Baer
2018-04-17 04:12:52 UTC
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Post by SC Tom
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Please let me know how in the heck to install Excel 2003, as all M$
programs go thru the "activation" junk, and i need to re-install my
Excel 2003 and (somehow) "activate" it
Any suggestions extremely welcome.
Thanks.
Office 2003 predates online activation.
* NOT TRUE; see below.
You need the original installation software (CDROM or ISO) and the multi
digit key code which came with it. When you start the installation it
will ask you to enter the code - doesn't even need an Internet connection.
* Yes; BUT...it bitches and eXplicitly gives X number of uses if you
do not activate it.
I never activated my Office 2003 (installed from CD), and was never
prompted to do so - over some years of use. [XP machine.] I _was_
prompted for the key during installation, which I entered. I recently
installed 2003 on this [7-32] machine (using a different key: I have
two), and again was prompted for the key during installation, but saw
(and have seen) no mention of activation, or a limited number of uses.
Maybe there are different versions of Office 2003, some of which _do_
require activation?
I agree with J.P. I use Word, Excel, and Outlook 2003, installed from
the Office Pro disc I bought way back when. I've had to re-install it
over the years/OS's without any activation requests, or any other
problem (as long as I enter the number correctly, LOL!). Even works fine
on my Win10 machines.
Were those installs before the drop-dead date?
Betcha you will see the activation complaint if you install now and
try to run it.
Paul
2018-04-17 05:34:49 UTC
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Post by Robert Baer
Post by SC Tom
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Please let me know how in the heck to install Excel 2003, as all M$
programs go thru the "activation" junk, and i need to re-install my
Excel 2003 and (somehow) "activate" it
Any suggestions extremely welcome.
Thanks.
Office 2003 predates online activation.
* NOT TRUE; see below.
You need the original installation software (CDROM or ISO) and the multi
digit key code which came with it. When you start the installation it
will ask you to enter the code - doesn't even need an Internet connection.
* Yes; BUT...it bitches and eXplicitly gives X number of uses if you
do not activate it.
I never activated my Office 2003 (installed from CD), and was never
prompted to do so - over some years of use. [XP machine.] I _was_
prompted for the key during installation, which I entered. I recently
installed 2003 on this [7-32] machine (using a different key: I have
two), and again was prompted for the key during installation, but saw
(and have seen) no mention of activation, or a limited number of uses.
Maybe there are different versions of Office 2003, some of which _do_
require activation?
I agree with J.P. I use Word, Excel, and Outlook 2003, installed from
the Office Pro disc I bought way back when. I've had to re-install it
over the years/OS's without any activation requests, or any other
problem (as long as I enter the number correctly, LOL!). Even works fine
on my Win10 machines.
Were those installs before the drop-dead date?
Betcha you will see the activation complaint if you install now and
try to run it.
Does any Microsoft software have a drop-dead date, with
respect to activation issues ? Apparently people can re-install
WinXP today, and the activation server is still present and
still works for people.

When they stop doing that (when they actually kill an activation server),
it will be big news... and lawsuit time.

Paul
Stan Brown
2018-04-19 03:17:34 UTC
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Post by Paul
Does any Microsoft software have a drop-dead date, with
respect to activation issues ? Apparently people can re-install
WinXP today, and the activation server is still present and
still works for people.
Office 2010 activations are no longer available, neither the
automatic Internet ones nor activation by phone.(*)

We are supposed to have a site license, because we create and erase
virtual machines frequently, but Microsoft shot down Office 2010
activations on us anyway.

(*) I dearly hope someone can prove me wrong. It would be a huge help
at work, where we need to test things with multiple versions of
Office.
--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://BrownMath.com/
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
Shikata ga nai...
Java Jive
2018-04-19 12:34:16 UTC
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Post by Stan Brown
Post by Paul
Does any Microsoft software have a drop-dead date, with
respect to activation issues ? Apparently people can re-install
WinXP today, and the activation server is still present and
still works for people.
Office 2010 activations are no longer available, neither the
automatic Internet ones nor activation by phone.(*)
We are supposed to have a site license, because we create and erase
virtual machines frequently, but Microsoft shot down Office 2010
activations on us anyway.
(*) I dearly hope someone can prove me wrong. It would be a huge help
at work, where we need to test things with multiple versions of
Office.
I reactivated my copy of Office 2010 on this machine earlier this year.
I purchased O2010 when I bought the laptop around Christmas 2012, so the
activation may have been via Dell, not Microsoft, nevertheless there are
some well known killers in O2010 activation, one of which initially I
fell foul of relating to permissions on certain files involved in the
activation process. Depending on what messages and other symptoms you
are getting, it's probably worth searching the internet for something
like "Office 2010 fails activation" "<put error message here>" and being
prepared to examine over several pages of hits.
Robert Baer
2018-04-19 20:45:31 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Stan Brown
Post by Paul
Does any Microsoft software have a drop-dead date, with
respect to activation issues ? Apparently people can re-install
WinXP today, and the activation server is still present and
still works for people.
Office 2010 activations are no longer available, neither the
automatic Internet ones nor activation by phone.(*)
We are supposed to have a site license, because we create and erase
virtual machines frequently, but Microsoft shot down Office 2010
activations on us anyway.
(*) I dearly hope someone can prove me wrong. It would be a huge help
at work, where we need to test things with multiple versions of
Office.
Thank you for the info!
Can act as proof that activation is needed for Office 2003 and no
phone support either.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-04-19 21:13:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Baer
Post by Stan Brown
Post by Paul
Does any Microsoft software have a drop-dead date, with
respect to activation issues ? Apparently people can re-install
WinXP today, and the activation server is still present and
still works for people.
Office 2010 activations are no longer available, neither the
automatic Internet ones nor activation by phone.(*)
We are supposed to have a site license, because we create and erase
virtual machines frequently, but Microsoft shot down Office 2010
activations on us anyway.
(*) I dearly hope someone can prove me wrong. It would be a huge help
at work, where we need to test things with multiple versions of
Office.
Thank you for the info!
Can act as proof that activation is needed for Office 2003 and no
phone support either.
I'm a bit puzzled how the above discussion of O2010 activation proves
anything about O2003. (I say again, my O2003 never showed any sign of
needing activation - or even going online - either many years ago, or in
the last month or two.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"Who came first? Adam or Eve?" "Adam of course; men always do."
Victoria Wood (via Peter Hesketh)
Robert Baer
2018-04-19 20:42:32 UTC
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Post by Paul
Post by Robert Baer
Post by SC Tom
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Please let me know how in the heck to install Excel 2003, as all M$
programs go thru the "activation" junk, and i need to re-install my
Excel 2003 and (somehow) "activate" it
Any suggestions extremely welcome.
Thanks.
Office 2003 predates online activation.
* NOT TRUE; see below.
You need the original installation software (CDROM or ISO) and the multi
digit key code which came with it. When you start the installation it
will ask you to enter the code - doesn't even need an Internet connection.
* Yes; BUT...it bitches and eXplicitly gives X number of uses if you
do not activate it.
I never activated my Office 2003 (installed from CD), and was never
prompted to do so - over some years of use. [XP machine.] I _was_
prompted for the key during installation, which I entered. I recently
installed 2003 on this [7-32] machine (using a different key: I have
two), and again was prompted for the key during installation, but saw
(and have seen) no mention of activation, or a limited number of uses.
Maybe there are different versions of Office 2003, some of which _do_
require activation?
I agree with J.P. I use Word, Excel, and Outlook 2003, installed from
the Office Pro disc I bought way back when. I've had to re-install it
over the years/OS's without any activation requests, or any other
problem (as long as I enter the number correctly, LOL!). Even works fine
on my Win10 machines.
Were those installs before the drop-dead date?
Betcha you will see the activation complaint if you install now and
try to run it.
Does any Microsoft software have a drop-dead date, with
respect to activation issues ? Apparently people can re-install
WinXP today, and the activation server is still present and
still works for people.
When they stop doing that (when they actually kill an activation server),
it will be big news... and lawsuit time.
Paul
I agree WRT WinXP, but at some time from about 5 years ago to maybe 1
year ago they somehow forced activation for Excel 2003 and later dropped
activation support.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-04-17 08:26:04 UTC
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Raw Message
[]
Post by Robert Baer
Post by SC Tom
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I never activated my Office 2003 (installed from CD), and was never
prompted to do so - over some years of use. [XP machine.] I _was_
prompted for the key during installation, which I entered. I recently
installed 2003 on this [7-32] machine (using a different key: I have
two), and again was prompted for the key during installation, but saw
(and have seen) no mention of activation, or a limited number of uses.
Maybe there are different versions of Office 2003, some of which _do_
require activation?
I agree with J.P. I use Word, Excel, and Outlook 2003, installed from
the Office Pro disc I bought way back when. I've had to re-install it
over the years/OS's without any activation requests, or any other
problem (as long as I enter the number correctly, LOL!). Even works fine
on my Win10 machines.
Were those installs before the drop-dead date?
Betcha you will see the activation complaint if you install now and
try to run it.
My installation on this machine was in the last month or two. Neither
this installation nor my previous one have ever given any signs of doing
anything online. Is that enough to convince you?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Every kid starts out as a natural-born scientist, and then we beat it out of
them. A few trickle through the system with their wonder and enthusiasm for
science intact. - Carl Sagan (interview w. Psychology Today published '96-1-1)
Paul
2018-04-17 09:04:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Baer
Post by SC Tom
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Please let me know how in the heck to install Excel 2003, as all M$
programs go thru the "activation" junk, and i need to re-install my
Excel 2003 and (somehow) "activate" it
Any suggestions extremely welcome.
Thanks.
Office 2003 predates online activation.
* NOT TRUE; see below.
You need the original installation software (CDROM or ISO) and the multi
digit key code which came with it. When you start the installation it
will ask you to enter the code - doesn't even need an Internet connection.
* Yes; BUT...it bitches and eXplicitly gives X number of uses if you
do not activate it.
I never activated my Office 2003 (installed from CD), and was never
prompted to do so - over some years of use. [XP machine.] I _was_
prompted for the key during installation, which I entered. I recently
installed 2003 on this [7-32] machine (using a different key: I have
two), and again was prompted for the key during installation, but saw
(and have seen) no mention of activation, or a limited number of uses.
Maybe there are different versions of Office 2003, some of which _do_
require activation?
I agree with J.P. I use Word, Excel, and Outlook 2003, installed from
the Office Pro disc I bought way back when. I've had to re-install it
over the years/OS's without any activation requests, or any other
problem (as long as I enter the number correctly, LOL!). Even works fine
on my Win10 machines.
Were those installs before the drop-dead date?
Betcha you will see the activation complaint if you install now and
try to run it.
Can you give us an MD5 or SHA1 checksum for the
installer file ? Also, a file size.

That's assuming this is some jumbo EXE you've got, an
MSI or a CAB of some sort.

A program like hashdeep can calculate MD5 or SHA1 for that for you.
The Microsoft fciv is no longer available for download.

Paul
SC Tom
2018-04-17 11:14:59 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Baer
Post by SC Tom
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Please let me know how in the heck to install Excel 2003, as all M$
programs go thru the "activation" junk, and i need to re-install my
Excel 2003 and (somehow) "activate" it
Any suggestions extremely welcome.
Thanks.
Office 2003 predates online activation.
* NOT TRUE; see below.
You need the original installation software (CDROM or ISO) and the multi
digit key code which came with it. When you start the installation it
will ask you to enter the code - doesn't even need an Internet connection.
* Yes; BUT...it bitches and eXplicitly gives X number of uses if you
do not activate it.
I never activated my Office 2003 (installed from CD), and was never
prompted to do so - over some years of use. [XP machine.] I _was_
prompted for the key during installation, which I entered. I recently
installed 2003 on this [7-32] machine (using a different key: I have
two), and again was prompted for the key during installation, but saw
(and have seen) no mention of activation, or a limited number of uses.
Maybe there are different versions of Office 2003, some of which _do_
require activation?
I agree with J.P. I use Word, Excel, and Outlook 2003, installed from
the Office Pro disc I bought way back when. I've had to re-install it
over the years/OS's without any activation requests, or any other
problem (as long as I enter the number correctly, LOL!). Even works fine
on my Win10 machines.
Were those installs before the drop-dead date?
Betcha you will see the activation complaint if you install now and try
to run it.
Worked fine the one time I had to "refresh" my installation of Outlook 2003.
That was within the last 6 months.
--
SC Tom
PeterC
2018-04-16 15:07:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Please let me know how in the heck to install Excel 2003, as all M$
programs go thru the "activation" junk, and i need to re-install my
Excel 2003 and (somehow) "activate" it
Any suggestions extremely welcome.
Thanks.
Office 2003 predates online activation.
* NOT TRUE; see below.
You need the original installation software (CDROM or ISO) and the multi
digit key code which came with it. When you start the installation it
will ask you to enter the code - doesn't even need an Internet connection.
* Yes; BUT...it bitches and eXplicitly gives X number of uses if you do
not activate it.
I never activated my Office 2003 (installed from CD), and was never
prompted to do so - over some years of use. [XP machine.] I _was_
prompted for the key during installation, which I entered. I recently
installed 2003 on this [7-32] machine (using a different key: I have
two), and again was prompted for the key during installation, but saw
(and have seen) no mention of activation, or a limited number of uses.
Maybe there are different versions of Office 2003, some of which _do_
require activation?
I don't know about activation, but somebody gave me an Office Pro 2003 CD
about 14 years ago. When I installed it I put in the number as asked. After
it had finished it didn't mention activation - just asked me if I wanted to
roll it out to other machines on the network. I had one PC only!
At a guess, it could be a pro. Pro - OK for multiple machines.

Although I still have the CD I now prefer LibreOffice.
--
Peter.
The gods will stay away
whilst religions hold sway
Good Guy
2018-04-16 20:35:23 UTC
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Post by PeterC
I don't know about activation, but somebody gave me an Office Pro 2003 CD
about 14 years ago. When I installed it I put in the number as asked. After
it had finished it didn't mention activation - just asked me if I wanted to
roll it out to other machines on the network. I had one PC only!
At a guess, it could be a pro. Pro - OK for multiple machines.
You had a pirated Volume Licensed Software. These days Microsoft has
tightened its security features and now you need different ways to
activate Volume Licensed software for corporations. Old method allowed
people to pirate the software quite easily but now it has become some
what difficult. However, all technology can be fooled so some people
are still using pirated software. Robert Baer is an example.
Post by PeterC
/--- This email has been checked for viruses by
Windows Defender software.
//https://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/windows/comprehensive-security/
--
With over 600 million devices now running Windows 10, customer
satisfaction is higher than any previous version of windows.
Good Guy
2018-04-16 20:25:01 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Maybe there are different versions of Office 2003, some of which _do_
require activation?
The OP is using a pirated version which Microsoft has NOW BLOCKED. He
can't even use a telephone just in case he is caught by authorities
RED-HANDED trying to steal Microsoft software.

Mind you, telephone calls can give away your identity. Internet can be
fooled by using VPN and all that.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
/--- This email has been checked for viruses by
Windows Defender software.
//https://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/windows/comprehensive-security/
--
With over 600 million devices now running Windows 10, customer
satisfaction is higher than any previous version of windows.
Robert Baer
2018-04-17 04:40:45 UTC
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Post by Good Guy
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Maybe there are different versions of Office 2003, some of which _do_
require activation?
The OP is using a pirated version which Microsoft has NOW BLOCKED. He
can't even use a telephone just in case he is caught by authorities
RED-HANDED trying to steal Microsoft software.
Mind you, telephone calls can give away your identity. Internet can be
fooled by using VPN and all that.
YOU are a piece of work.
To be X-rated, that is to say, eXplicit, my CD is "Microsoft Office
Student and Teacher Edition 2003".
Virtually unreadable as holographic blaze obscured: "(C) 2004
Microsoft Corporation"
And below that, even MORE obscured, something like "ALL rights reserved"
NEXT 2 lines impossible to read as-is.
SC Tom
2018-04-17 11:23:51 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Robert Baer
Post by Good Guy
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Maybe there are different versions of Office 2003, some of which _do_
require activation?
The OP is using a pirated version which Microsoft has NOW BLOCKED. He
can't even use a telephone just in case he is caught by authorities
RED-HANDED trying to steal Microsoft software.
Mind you, telephone calls can give away your identity. Internet can be
fooled by using VPN and all that.
YOU are a piece of work.
To be X-rated, that is to say, eXplicit, my CD is "Microsoft Office
Student and Teacher Edition 2003".
Virtually unreadable as holographic blaze obscured: "(C) 2004 Microsoft
Corporation"
And below that, even MORE obscured, something like "ALL rights reserved"
NEXT 2 lines impossible to read as-is.
Maybe it IS because it's the "Student and Teacher Edition" that it needs
activation. Since you have to provide proof that you are one or the other,
maybe it thinks you're now trying to install it on a new machine? I got
nothing, other than my Office Pro 2003 installs and runs just fine without
any activation messages.
Sorry.
--
SC Tom
Paul
2018-04-17 12:43:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by SC Tom
Post by Robert Baer
Post by Good Guy
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Maybe there are different versions of Office 2003, some of which _do_
require activation?
The OP is using a pirated version which Microsoft has NOW BLOCKED. He
can't even use a telephone just in case he is caught by authorities
RED-HANDED trying to steal Microsoft software.
Mind you, telephone calls can give away your identity. Internet can be
fooled by using VPN and all that.
YOU are a piece of work.
To be X-rated, that is to say, eXplicit, my CD is "Microsoft Office
Student and Teacher Edition 2003".
Virtually unreadable as holographic blaze obscured: "(C) 2004
Microsoft Corporation"
And below that, even MORE obscured, something like "ALL rights reserved"
NEXT 2 lines impossible to read as-is.
Maybe it IS because it's the "Student and Teacher Edition" that it needs
activation. Since you have to provide proof that you are one or the
other, maybe it thinks you're now trying to install it on a new machine?
I got nothing, other than my Office Pro 2003 installs and runs just fine
without any activation messages.
Sorry.
https://www.amazon.com/product-reviews/B0009WA0P4/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_viewopt_kywd?ie=UTF8&reviewerType=all_reviews&pageNumber=1&filterByKeyword=activation

"Great productivity tool
By duane dewaldon March 10, 2015
Verified Purchase

Getting it activated now has to be done by phone... <===
"

How can, what is effectively a "family pack" released in 2003,
still be for sale in 2018 ? Microsoft usually cuts off three-packs
after a very short time, and the price rises to "regular price".

How many would you need to stockpile, to have a "stash" for 15 years ?
A hundred thousand of them ? Are these "keygen + pressing plant" material ?
Perhaps delivered in a plain brown envelope ?

It's fun to find stuff like this for sale, but... the
seller better have a sterling reputation. The product
cannot have just "fallen off the back of a truck".
Or you'll get a surprise answer when you're on the phone
with the "activation person" (that's if your key entry
deflects you to a human).

Paul
Robert Baer
2018-04-19 21:00:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by SC Tom
Post by Robert Baer
Post by Good Guy
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Maybe there are different versions of Office 2003, some of which _do_
require activation?
The OP is using a pirated version which Microsoft has NOW BLOCKED. He
can't even use a telephone just in case he is caught by authorities
RED-HANDED trying to steal Microsoft software.
Mind you, telephone calls can give away your identity. Internet can be
fooled by using VPN and all that.
YOU are a piece of work.
To be X-rated, that is to say, eXplicit, my CD is "Microsoft Office
Student and Teacher Edition 2003".
Virtually unreadable as holographic blaze obscured: "(C) 2004
Microsoft Corporation"
And below that, even MORE obscured, something like "ALL rights reserved"
NEXT 2 lines impossible to read as-is.
Maybe it IS because it's the "Student and Teacher Edition" that it needs
activation. Since you have to provide proof that you are one or the
other, maybe it thinks you're now trying to install it on a new machine?
I got nothing, other than my Office Pro 2003 installs and runs just fine
without any activation messages.
Sorry.
Have used Office 2003 for ages, n problems, no activation needed.
Even had 2 different OSes (Win2K, WinXP), same "machine" .
The XP got clobbered.
NEVER was asked about status (student or teacher); so that cannot be
the issue.
SC Tom
2018-04-20 10:53:26 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Baer
Post by SC Tom
Post by Robert Baer
Post by Good Guy
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Maybe there are different versions of Office 2003, some of which _do_
require activation?
The OP is using a pirated version which Microsoft has NOW BLOCKED. He
can't even use a telephone just in case he is caught by authorities
RED-HANDED trying to steal Microsoft software.
Mind you, telephone calls can give away your identity. Internet can be
fooled by using VPN and all that.
YOU are a piece of work.
To be X-rated, that is to say, eXplicit, my CD is "Microsoft Office
Student and Teacher Edition 2003".
Virtually unreadable as holographic blaze obscured: "(C) 2004
Microsoft Corporation"
And below that, even MORE obscured, something like "ALL rights reserved"
NEXT 2 lines impossible to read as-is.
Maybe it IS because it's the "Student and Teacher Edition" that it needs
activation. Since you have to provide proof that you are one or the
other, maybe it thinks you're now trying to install it on a new machine?
I got nothing, other than my Office Pro 2003 installs and runs just fine
without any activation messages.
Sorry.
Have used Office 2003 for ages, n problems, no activation needed.
Even had 2 different OSes (Win2K, WinXP), same "machine" .
The XP got clobbered.
NEVER was asked about status (student or teacher); so that cannot be the
issue.
As a test on the machine I seldom use Office on, I uninstalled the whole
package (using Geek Uninstaller, which is similar to Revo in that it removes
all registry entries, personal settings/folders, etc.), and reinstalled
Office Pro 2003 Outlook, Excel, and Word. Everything went smooth as silk
with no activation required, and the only online activity was for the usual
Windows updates- Compatibility package, security updates for Office, etc.
Granted, this is a Win10Pro machine and not a Win7 one, but I think that
proves that OP2003 doesn't require activation (at least not for me, and I
guarantee, I have no inside track with Microsoft :-) )
--
SC Tom
Ken Blake
2018-04-20 15:45:24 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by SC Tom
As a test on the machine I seldom use Office on, I uninstalled the whole
package (using Geek Uninstaller, which is similar to Revo in that it removes
all registry entries, personal settings/folders, etc.),
I never heard of Geek Uninstaller, so let me ask you a few questions
about it:

Why do you use it instead of Revo? Do you think it's better? What is
better about it?
Monty
2018-04-20 21:50:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ken Blake
Post by SC Tom
As a test on the machine I seldom use Office on, I uninstalled the whole
package (using Geek Uninstaller, which is similar to Revo in that it removes
all registry entries, personal settings/folders, etc.),
I never heard of Geek Uninstaller, so let me ask you a few questions
Why do you use it instead of Revo? Do you think it's better? What is
better about it?
It is FREE !!
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-04-20 21:56:34 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Monty
Post by Ken Blake
Post by SC Tom
As a test on the machine I seldom use Office on, I uninstalled the whole
package (using Geek Uninstaller, which is similar to Revo in that it removes
all registry entries, personal settings/folders, etc.),
I never heard of Geek Uninstaller, so let me ask you a few questions
Why do you use it instead of Revo? Do you think it's better? What is
better about it?
It is FREE !!
So is Revo free.

So what does Geek uninstaller free have over Revo free? (We're nor
disagreeing with you, we genuinely are curious.)
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by."
- Douglas Adams
Monty
2018-04-20 23:12:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 20 Apr 2018 22:56:34 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Monty
Post by Ken Blake
Post by SC Tom
As a test on the machine I seldom use Office on, I uninstalled the whole
package (using Geek Uninstaller, which is similar to Revo in that it removes
all registry entries, personal settings/folders, etc.),
I never heard of Geek Uninstaller, so let me ask you a few questions
Why do you use it instead of Revo? Do you think it's better? What is
better about it?
It is FREE !!
So is Revo free.
I use Revo Pro version, which is not free.
Ken Blake
2018-04-20 23:42:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 20 Apr 2018 22:56:34 +0100, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Monty
Post by Ken Blake
Post by SC Tom
As a test on the machine I seldom use Office on, I uninstalled the whole
package (using Geek Uninstaller, which is similar to Revo in that it removes
all registry entries, personal settings/folders, etc.),
I never heard of Geek Uninstaller, so let me ask you a few questions
Why do you use it instead of Revo? Do you think it's better? What is
better about it?
It is FREE !!
So is Revo free.
Yes.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
So what does Geek uninstaller free have over Revo free? (We're nor
disagreeing with you, we genuinely are curious.)
Right. I can't disagree about a product I know nothing about.
SC Tom
2018-04-21 10:55:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ken Blake
Post by SC Tom
As a test on the machine I seldom use Office on, I uninstalled the whole
package (using Geek Uninstaller, which is similar to Revo in that it removes
all registry entries, personal settings/folders, etc.),
I never heard of Geek Uninstaller, so let me ask you a few questions
Why do you use it instead of Revo? Do you think it's better? What is
better about it?
I don't remember why I chose Geek over Revo other than at the time I
switched, Revo Free did not support 64-bit systems, and Geek did. I don't
know if that has changed or not, but I liked Geek and stayed with it. It
doesn't need to track an install in order to do a very clean uninstall
(although the Pro version offers that). And, like Revo, it's portable.
Here's a link to it:
<https://geekuninstaller.com/>

I can't really say if it's any better than Revo or not, but it works for me,
has a very simple interface, and seems to do a good job without much
interface (or interference) from me :-) And after all these years, I saw no
reason to switch back to Revo.
--
SC Tom
mechanic
2018-04-21 11:42:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by SC Tom
I don't remember why I chose Geek over Revo other than at the time I
switched, Revo Free did not support 64-bit systems, and Geek did.
Yes, same here. Is Revo free still a 32-bit program?
Ken Blake
2018-04-21 15:29:48 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by mechanic
Post by SC Tom
I don't remember why I chose Geek over Revo other than at the time I
switched, Revo Free did not support 64-bit systems, and Geek did.
Yes, same here. Is Revo free still a 32-bit program?
Yes, but like most 32-bit programs, it supports both 32-bit and 64-bit
versions of Windows.
Mike S
2018-04-21 23:26:02 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ken Blake
Post by mechanic
Post by SC Tom
I don't remember why I chose Geek over Revo other than at the time I
switched, Revo Free did not support 64-bit systems, and Geek did.
Yes, same here. Is Revo free still a 32-bit program?
Yes, but like most 32-bit programs, it supports both 32-bit and 64-bit
versions of Windows.
Works great on my w7 x64 ult.

Revo Uninstaller Free 2.0 gets full 64-bit support
https://betanews.com/2016/08/05/revo-uninstaller-free-2-0-gets-full-64-bit-support/

Release history of Revo Uninstaller Freeware
https://www.revouninstaller.com/revo_uninstaller_full_version_history.html

August 04, 2016 Revo Uninstaller Freeware version 2.0.0

Added - Full 64-bit support
Added - Details Panel about selected program in Icon view
Added - Еxport command(for the list of installed programs and
leftovers)
Improved User Interface
Improved Hunter Mode
Improved all 8 additional tools
Many minor improvements
Shadow
2018-04-22 01:15:29 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mike S
Post by Ken Blake
Post by mechanic
Post by SC Tom
I don't remember why I chose Geek over Revo other than at the time I
switched, Revo Free did not support 64-bit systems, and Geek did.
Yes, same here. Is Revo free still a 32-bit program?
Yes, but like most 32-bit programs, it supports both 32-bit and 64-bit
versions of Windows.
Works great on my w7 x64 ult.
Revo Uninstaller Free 2.0 gets full 64-bit support
https://betanews.com/2016/08/05/revo-uninstaller-free-2-0-gets-full-64-bit-support/
Release history of Revo Uninstaller Freeware
https://www.revouninstaller.com/revo_uninstaller_full_version_history.html
August 04, 2016 Revo Uninstaller Freeware version 2.0.0
Added - Full 64-bit support
Added - Details Panel about selected program in Icon view
Added - ?xport command(for the list of installed programs and
leftovers)
Improved User Interface
Improved Hunter Mode
Improved all 8 additional tools
Many minor improvements
How does it compare to Soft Organizer ?

https://www.chemtable.com/soft-organizer.htm

Does it monitor everything the program does on install and
when it's run ?
I found that if I monitor with Soft Organizer, then uninstall
with Geek Uninstaller, and THEN uninstall with Soft Organizer, Geek
Uninstaller sometimes misses hundreds of registry entries and files.
[]'s
--
Don't be evil - Google 2004
We have a new policy - Google 2012
Ken Blake
2018-04-22 15:30:20 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Shadow
How does it compare to Soft Organizer ?
https://www.chemtable.com/soft-organizer.htm
Does it monitor everything the program does on install and
when it's run ?
I found that if I monitor with Soft Organizer, then uninstall
with Geek Uninstaller, and THEN uninstall with Soft Organizer, Geek
Uninstaller sometimes misses hundreds of registry entries and files.
I've never heard of Soft Organizer, so I have no opinion about it. But
I have two comments:

1. Clearing out unneeded registry entries and files sounds nice, but
in practice it has next to no value.

2. Any program that clears out registry entries scares me. Mistakenly
clearing out something that is actually needed can be disastrous.

I'm not saying Soft Organizer is bad and should never be used; again I
know nothing about it. But I am saying that any such program should be
approached with the greatest caution.
mechanic
2018-04-22 19:24:29 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ken Blake
I've never heard of Soft Organizer, so I have no opinion about it.
1. Clearing out unneeded registry entries and files sounds nice,
but in practice it has next to no value.
2. Any program that clears out registry entries scares me.
Mistakenly clearing out something that is actually needed can be
disastrous.
That's what the automatic restore points are for.
Ken Blake
2018-04-22 19:42:35 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by mechanic
Post by Ken Blake
I've never heard of Soft Organizer, so I have no opinion about it.
1. Clearing out unneeded registry entries and files sounds nice,
but in practice it has next to no value.
2. Any program that clears out registry entries scares me.
Mistakenly clearing out something that is actually needed can be
disastrous.
That's what the automatic restore points are for.
Yes, and they are great *unless* the registry editing leaves you with
an unbootable computer, which sometimes happens.
Robert Baer
2018-04-24 04:32:55 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by mechanic
Post by Ken Blake
I've never heard of Soft Organizer, so I have no opinion about it.
1. Clearing out unneeded registry entries and files sounds nice,
but in practice it has next to no value.
2. Any program that clears out registry entries scares me.
Mistakenly clearing out something that is actually needed can be
disastrous.
That's what the automatic restore points are for.
ONLY,,, they are NOT automatic.
I have never seen one (Win2K, WinXP, Win7).
And nobody tells you how to FORCE one.

Noodling around, i find "By default, Windows won’t create an
automatic restore point if another restore point has been created in the
last 24 hours. This does not prevent you from creating a manual restore
point"

That must mean 24 hours of continuous operation - so shutdown (TOTAL
POWER OFF) after say 5 hours of use kills the process (never seen it).

Instructions for manual creating restore point are totally useless
(for Win 8 etc).
Paul
2018-04-24 05:28:22 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Baer
Post by mechanic
Post by Ken Blake
I've never heard of Soft Organizer, so I have no opinion about it.
1. Clearing out unneeded registry entries and files sounds nice,
but in practice it has next to no value.
2. Any program that clears out registry entries scares me.
Mistakenly clearing out something that is actually needed can be
disastrous.
That's what the automatic restore points are for.
ONLY,,, they are NOT automatic.
I have never seen one (Win2K, WinXP, Win7).
And nobody tells you how to FORCE one.
Noodling around, i find "By default, Windows won’t create an automatic
restore point if another restore point has been created in the last 24
hours. This does not prevent you from creating a manual restore point"
That must mean 24 hours of continuous operation - so shutdown (TOTAL
POWER OFF) after say 5 hours of use kills the process (never seen it).
Instructions for manual creating restore point are totally useless
(for Win 8 etc).
Manual restore points work.

The frequency of automatic restore points varies with OS.

It's around daily on something like WinXP.

It's around once a week or so for modern OSes.
And Windows 10 has, on occasion, turned it off, so you really
have to check it's enabled on Windows 10.

Computers were never meant to be consistent :-/ so don't
be surprised if "YMMV".

As an example, one person in this thread comments that the
script on this page, is "erasing the old restore points".
Well, that happens if you don't set the storage space
allocation large enough for it.

http://www.winhelponline.com/blog/create-system-restore-point-script-windows-10-8-7-vista-xp/

Paul
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-04-24 13:17:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
In message <pbmf9k$5n6$***@dont-email.me>, Paul <***@needed.invalid>
writes:
[]
Post by Paul
Manual restore points work.
The frequency of automatic restore points varies with OS.
It's around daily on something like WinXP.
It's around once a week or so for modern OSes.
And Windows 10 has, on occasion, turned it off, so you really
have to check it's enabled on Windows 10.
Not only 10; I think I've seen them turned off on XP and 7. (Though
whether the culprit was Windows itself or some other installed software,
I'm not sure.)
[]
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

the plural of 'anecdote' is not 'evidence'. Professor Edzart Ernst, prudential
magazine, AUTUMN 2006, p. 13.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-04-24 13:13:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Baer
Post by mechanic
Post by Ken Blake
I've never heard of Soft Organizer, so I have no opinion about it.
1. Clearing out unneeded registry entries and files sounds nice,
but in practice it has next to no value.
2. Any program that clears out registry entries scares me.
Mistakenly clearing out something that is actually needed can be
disastrous.
That's what the automatic restore points are for.
ONLY,,, they are NOT automatic.
Ken Blake or mechanic may have been referring to the automatic restore
points made by Soft Organiser, rather than Windows itself. I've never
used (or heard of until this thread!) Soft Organiser, but several things
- Registry First Aid and Revo Uninstaller for example - automatically
create a restore point before they perform their main function. (In fact
I don't think, in either of those, you can prevent them from doing so.)
Post by Robert Baer
I have never seen one (Win2K, WinXP, Win7).
It's rather too easy (IMO - I'm sure those who decry them anyway, won't
agree) for their creation to be turned off; what's more irritating is
that if the creation _is_ turned off, the action of doing so also
deletes already-created ones. (ERUNT is arguably better, in that the
ones it creates are never deleted unless _you_ delete them. But it
doesn't have any automatic option, AFAIK.)
Post by Robert Baer
And nobody tells you how to FORCE one.
[Have you searched the entire internet (-:?] I'd agree that manually
instigating the creation of a restore point could certainly be made a
lot more intuitive.
Post by Robert Baer
Noodling around, i find "By default, Windows won’t create an
automatic restore point if another restore point has been created in
the last 24 hours. This does not prevent you from creating a manual
restore point"
That must mean 24 hours of continuous operation - so shutdown (TOTAL
POWER OFF) after say 5 hours of use kills the process (never seen it).
You may have it turned off anyway. (I don't know if it is 24 hours'
continuous, or just at a predefined time [which could still prevent it
if you always have your computer off at that time].)
Post by Robert Baer
Instructions for manual creating restore point are totally useless
(for Win 8 etc).
Which instructions? If you mean the Microsoft ones as built into
Windows, I'd agree (up to 7 - I haven't seen them for later). I'd be
surprised if there aren't followable instructions on the web somewhere,
though.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

the plural of 'anecdote' is not 'evidence'. Professor Edzart Ernst, prudential
magazine, AUTUMN 2006, p. 13.
mechanic
2018-04-24 20:12:03 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Which instructions? If you mean the Microsoft ones as built into
Windows, I'd agree (up to 7 - I haven't seen them for later). I'd
be surprised if there aren't followable instructions on the web
somewhere, though.
Strewth JP! There's a button marked 'create a restore point right
now' and you just have to hit it. What could be simpler?
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-04-24 20:45:34 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by mechanic
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Which instructions? If you mean the Microsoft ones as built into
Windows, I'd agree (up to 7 - I haven't seen them for later). I'd
be surprised if there aren't followable instructions on the web
somewhere, though.
Strewth JP! There's a button marked 'create a restore point right
now' and you just have to hit it. What could be simpler?
If, for some reason, Restore Points have been disabled on all qualifying
drives/partitions, that button is greyed (or at least doesn't do
anything). How to re-enable it - which is part of making restore points
- isn't obvious to the newcomer.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"quidquid latine dictum sit, altum viditur". ("Anything is more impressive if
you say it in Latin")
Shadow
2018-04-23 13:31:45 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Shadow
How does it compare to Soft Organizer ?
https://www.chemtable.com/soft-organizer.htm
Does it monitor everything the program does on install and
when it's run ?
I found that if I monitor with Soft Organizer, then uninstall
with Geek Uninstaller, and THEN uninstall with Soft Organizer, Geek
Uninstaller sometimes misses hundreds of registry entries and files.
I've never heard of Soft Organizer, so I have no opinion about it. But
1. Clearing out unneeded registry entries and files sounds nice, but
in practice it has next to no value.
2. Any program that clears out registry entries scares me. Mistakenly
clearing out something that is actually needed can be disastrous.
It only removes registry entries created by the installer. And
reverses any that might have been changed by the installer, or by
running the program.
So no danger there. Been using it for years with no bad
effects. It's NOT a "cleaner", it's an uninstaller.
Something like ZSoft Uninstaller (which I think was
abandoned).
[]'s
Post by Ken Blake
I'm not saying Soft Organizer is bad and should never be used; again I
know nothing about it. But I am saying that any such program should be
approached with the greatest caution.
--
Don't be evil - Google 2004
We have a new policy - Google 2012
Ken Blake
2018-04-23 16:40:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Shadow
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Shadow
How does it compare to Soft Organizer ?
https://www.chemtable.com/soft-organizer.htm
Does it monitor everything the program does on install and
when it's run ?
I found that if I monitor with Soft Organizer, then uninstall
with Geek Uninstaller, and THEN uninstall with Soft Organizer, Geek
Uninstaller sometimes misses hundreds of registry entries and files.
I've never heard of Soft Organizer, so I have no opinion about it. But
1. Clearing out unneeded registry entries and files sounds nice, but
in practice it has next to no value.
2. Any program that clears out registry entries scares me. Mistakenly
clearing out something that is actually needed can be disastrous.
It only removes registry entries created by the installer.
In theory, yes. My concern is that it might do something it wasn't
meant to do.
Shadow
2018-04-23 21:48:54 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Shadow
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Shadow
How does it compare to Soft Organizer ?
https://www.chemtable.com/soft-organizer.htm
Does it monitor everything the program does on install and
when it's run ?
I found that if I monitor with Soft Organizer, then uninstall
with Geek Uninstaller, and THEN uninstall with Soft Organizer, Geek
Uninstaller sometimes misses hundreds of registry entries and files.
I've never heard of Soft Organizer, so I have no opinion about it. But
1. Clearing out unneeded registry entries and files sounds nice, but
in practice it has next to no value.
2. Any program that clears out registry entries scares me. Mistakenly
clearing out something that is actually needed can be disastrous.
It only removes registry entries created by the installer.
In theory, yes. My concern is that it might do something it wasn't
meant to do.
It does. The retail version sometimes flashes a MSG Box asking
you to "like" it on Facebook.
The horror !!!
I mean that seriously.
[]'s
--
Don't be evil - Google 2004
We have a new policy - Google 2012
Robert Baer
2018-04-24 04:18:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Shadow
How does it compare to Soft Organizer ?
https://www.chemtable.com/soft-organizer.htm
Does it monitor everything the program does on install and
when it's run ?
I found that if I monitor with Soft Organizer, then uninstall
with Geek Uninstaller, and THEN uninstall with Soft Organizer, Geek
Uninstaller sometimes misses hundreds of registry entries and files.
I've never heard of Soft Organizer, so I have no opinion about it. But
1. Clearing out unneeded registry entries and files sounds nice, but
in practice it has next to no value.
* Well, some programs look at the registry for a "footprint" and base
installation "progress" accordingly (eg: refuse to install, or to work,
or, or...).
Post by Ken Blake
2. Any program that clears out registry entries scares me. Mistakenly
clearing out something that is actually needed can be disastrous.
I'm not saying Soft Organizer is bad and should never be used; again I
know nothing about it. But I am saying that any such program should be
approached with the greatest caution.
Robert Baer
2018-04-24 04:13:18 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by SC Tom
Geek Uninstaller
Thanks.
Robert Baer
2018-04-17 04:10:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Please let me know how in the heck to install Excel 2003, as all M$
programs go thru the "activation" junk, and i need to re-install my
Excel 2003 and (somehow) "activate" it
Any suggestions extremely welcome.
Thanks.
Office 2003 predates online activation.
* NOT TRUE; see below.
You need the original installation software (CDROM or ISO) and the multi
digit key code which came with it. When you start the installation it
will ask you to enter the code - doesn't even need an Internet connection.
* Yes; BUT...it bitches and eXplicitly gives X number of uses if you
do not activate it.
I never activated my Office 2003 (installed from CD), and was never
prompted to do so - over some years of use. [XP machine.] I _was_
prompted for the key during installation, which I entered. I recently
installed 2003 on this [7-32] machine (using a different key: I have
two), and again was prompted for the key during installation, but saw
(and have seen) no mention of activation, or a limited number of uses.
Maybe there are different versions of Office 2003, some of which _do_
require activation?
Had the exact same experience on installs before the M$ drop-dead date.
One of them got clobbered beyond repair, so am starting from scratch;
wipe HD, install XP SP3, install Excel 2003, no complaints.
UNTIL i ran it and then get activation complaint (limited number of
uses until unspecified crashes).
And it did this even tho i dated the system Apr 2010.
Paul
2018-04-17 05:37:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Robert Baer
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Please let me know how in the heck to install Excel 2003, as all M$
programs go thru the "activation" junk, and i need to re-install my
Excel 2003 and (somehow) "activate" it
Any suggestions extremely welcome.
Thanks.
Office 2003 predates online activation.
* NOT TRUE; see below.
You need the original installation software (CDROM or ISO) and the multi
digit key code which came with it. When you start the installation it
will ask you to enter the code - doesn't even need an Internet connection.
* Yes; BUT...it bitches and eXplicitly gives X number of uses if you
do not activate it.
I never activated my Office 2003 (installed from CD), and was never
prompted to do so - over some years of use. [XP machine.] I _was_
prompted for the key during installation, which I entered. I recently
installed 2003 on this [7-32] machine (using a different key: I have
two), and again was prompted for the key during installation, but saw
(and have seen) no mention of activation, or a limited number of uses.
Maybe there are different versions of Office 2003, some of which _do_
require activation?
Had the exact same experience on installs before the M$ drop-dead date.
One of them got clobbered beyond repair, so am starting from scratch;
wipe HD, install XP SP3, install Excel 2003, no complaints.
UNTIL i ran it and then get activation complaint (limited number of
uses until unspecified crashes).
And it did this even tho i dated the system Apr 2010.
If the Activation server reports "too many re-installs" for
a product with activation, the server will stop activating
the product.

You can phone Microsoft at the toll-free number, and have
them reset that. Explain what you were doing, like that you
were installing over and over again because you thought
there would be a different/better outcome, and they may
help you.

A certain number of software issues with Microsoft, receive
free support. And resolving Activation issues is one of those.

Paul
Robert Baer
2018-04-19 20:54:12 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Paul
If the Activation server reports "too many re-installs" for
a product with activation, the server will stop activating
the product.
You can phone Microsoft at the toll-free number, and have
them reset that. Explain what you were doing, like that you
were installing over and over again because you thought
there would be a different/better outcome, and they may
help you.
A certain number of software issues with Microsoft, receive
free support. And resolving Activation issues is one of those.
Paul
Thanks, worth the try.
Ammammata
2018-04-17 10:02:15 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Il giorno Mon 16 Apr 2018 02:07:38p, *J. P. Gilliver (John)* ha inviato su
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
I never activated my Office 2003
neither did I, it wasn't a required step
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
http://www.bb2002.it :) <<<<<
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