Discussion:
Renaming changed format?
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masonc
2018-05-05 21:59:59 UTC
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Can renaming a file change its format?

Changing file names in Win7pro caused my mp3 player
to reject them as "format not correct"

Files transfer normally otherwise.

Computer disks NTFC. Player is FAT32, internal and card.
Paul in Houston TX
2018-05-05 22:43:56 UTC
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Post by masonc
Can renaming a file change its format?
Changing file names in Win7pro caused my mp3 player
to reject them as "format not correct"
Files transfer normally otherwise.
Computer disks NTFC. Player is FAT32, internal and card.
I've renamed hundreds of mp3 files and never had that happen with true mp3 files.
Sometimes the files are not mp3 though and the assigned player still plays them.
Open one with Irfan and see if it says anything about incorrect format.
Paul
2018-05-06 01:50:05 UTC
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Post by masonc
Can renaming a file change its format?
Changing file names in Win7pro caused my mp3 player
to reject them as "format not correct"
Files transfer normally otherwise.
Computer disks NTFC. Player is FAT32, internal and card.
I suppose it depends on how "sophisticated" the player is.

There are two ways to identify files. You can "trust" the
file extension and then try and parse the 4CC codes in the file
and play it.

Or, you can ignore the file extension and "sniff" the file
for characteristic identification strings.

If I wanted a general purpose tool to offer opinions on
files, I might try ffmpeg/ffprobe/ffplay package. While I
could try the bash shell "file" command, it might not offer
the level of detail that ffmpeg could.

https://ffmpeg.zeranoe.com/builds/

Click the ugly buttons on the web page, to select:

Release build 4.0
Windows 32 or Windows 64, as you see fit
Linking: Static (no separate DLLs needed)
Then click the blue Download Build button.

If you had an older platform, you might try this one.

https://ffmpeg.zeranoe.com/builds/win32/static/ffmpeg-4.0-win32-static.zip

When I tried a nightly build several months ago, it wasn't
linked properly and the static build was internally missing
some DLLs. The release build (4.0), one would hope it's
tested well enough to run on your computer. Then, feed
the program a file, and check the Command Prompt output
text for details about what kind of file it is.

If it really is a .mp3, put the .mp3 extension back on it.
Then see if your player has an appetite.

Paul
masonc
2018-05-06 02:09:19 UTC
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Post by masonc
Can renaming a file change its format?
Changing file names in Win7pro caused my mp3 player
to reject them as "format not correct"
Files transfer normally otherwise.
Computer disks NTFC. Player is FAT32, internal and card.
These are mp3 "music" files (actually voice: stories)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-06 06:27:07 UTC
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Post by masonc
Post by masonc
Can renaming a file change its format?
Changing file names in Win7pro caused my mp3 player
to reject them as "format not correct"
Files transfer normally otherwise.
Computer disks NTFC. Player is FAT32, internal and card.
These are mp3 "music" files (actually voice: stories)
What is the nature of the renaming you're doing?

If you're changing the extension on the file name (either to .mp3 _from_
something else, or from .mp3 _to_ something else), then I'm not
surprised.

If you're changing the part of the name before the dot, _some_ players
may be fussy about (a) filenames longer than 8 characters (b) filenames
with certain characters in them.

To answer your first line: I've never experienced _any_ situation where
changing the name of a file - whatever the nature of the change - alters
its contents. However, it often (I'd say usually) alters what the device
or OS handling them _expects_ to be the contents, if the change is to
the extension at least.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

To keep leaf vegetables clean and crisp, cook lightly, then plunge into iced
water (the vegetables, that is). - manual for a Russell Hobbs electric steamer
PeterC
2018-05-06 07:24:34 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by masonc
Post by masonc
Can renaming a file change its format?
Changing file names in Win7pro caused my mp3 player
to reject them as "format not correct"
Files transfer normally otherwise.
Computer disks NTFC. Player is FAT32, internal and card.
These are mp3 "music" files (actually voice: stories)
What is the nature of the renaming you're doing?
If you're changing the extension on the file name (either to .mp3 _from_
something else, or from .mp3 _to_ something else), then I'm not
surprised.
If you're changing the part of the name before the dot, _some_ players
may be fussy about (a) filenames longer than 8 characters (b) filenames
with certain characters in them.
To answer your first line: I've never experienced _any_ situation where
changing the name of a file - whatever the nature of the change - alters
its contents. However, it often (I'd say usually) alters what the device
or OS handling them _expects_ to be the contents, if the change is to
the extension at least.
I've changed a file's extension a few times out of curiosity - it came about
due to a video not having an extension at all (I knew what it was, but not
why the lack of extension).
Not being sure of the correct extension, I gave it, IIRC, .mp4 and MPC
played it. In the spirit of 'science' I gave it another 3 or 4 extensions
and MPC just played it. Wouldn't play with no extension.
--
Peter.
The gods will stay away
whilst religions hold sway
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-06 07:43:07 UTC
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[]
Post by PeterC
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by masonc
Can renaming a file change its format?
[]
Post by PeterC
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
To answer your first line: I've never experienced _any_ situation where
changing the name of a file - whatever the nature of the change - alters
its contents. However, it often (I'd say usually) alters what the device
or OS handling them _expects_ to be the contents, if the change is to
the extension at least.
I've changed a file's extension a few times out of curiosity - it came about
due to a video not having an extension at all (I knew what it was, but not
why the lack of extension).
As to why, I've encountered at least one thing to do with video files
that had a tendency to omit the extension - I think it highlighted the
whole name on saving, so if you entered a new name the extension was
replaced (with nothing) too. I forget what it was/is - might have been a
downloader.
Post by PeterC
Not being sure of the correct extension, I gave it, IIRC, .mp4 and MPC
played it. In the spirit of 'science' I gave it another 3 or 4 extensions
and MPC just played it. Wouldn't play with no extension.
Double-clicking from explorer definitely wouldn't, as Windows wouldn't
know it had to go to MPC. In that spirit of "science", it might be
interesting to drag and drop it onto MPC's icon, or within MPC do a
file|open (with filetype set to ".* Any).

If you drop an _image file with no, or the wrong, extension onto
IrfanView, it will offer to correct it; IV now does play various video
files too (sometimes with a few seconds' delay), so it might be worth
seeing if it'll tell you what the type _should_ be. If not, there are
things that will - one called g-spot comes to mind, though I can't
remember if the name has the hyphen in it (and have fun googling for
that!).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you to recognize a mistake when
you make it again. -Franklin P. Jones
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