Discussion:
DVD Burning Program that uses the fast part of the platter?
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mike
2018-06-17 22:36:37 UTC
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I use win7 to download linux distros
and ImgBurn to create a bootable install DVD-RW.

If I put a 1.5GB .iso onto a DVD,
the data is put on the slowest part of the platter.
The read speed during install is dramatically
slower than if the data were on the fast/outside
part of the disk.

Is there a burning app that puts the .iso image
on the fast part of the DVD platter?
Wolf K
2018-06-18 01:19:18 UTC
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Post by mike
I use win7 to download linux distros
and ImgBurn to create a bootable install DVD-RW.
If I put a 1.5GB .iso onto a DVD,
the data is put on the slowest part of the platter.
The read speed during install is dramatically
slower than if the data were on the fast/outside
part of the disk.
Is there a burning app that puts the .iso image
on the fast part of the DVD platter?
No, it would violate standards. The readers/players start reading on the
inside track.
--
Wolf K
kirkwood40.blogspot.com
Ethics is knowing the difference between what you have a right to do and
what is right to do. Potter Stewart
pjp
2018-06-18 02:08:52 UTC
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In article <tMDVC.387966$***@fx38.iad>, ***@sympatico.ca
says...
Post by Wolf K
Post by mike
I use win7 to download linux distros
and ImgBurn to create a bootable install DVD-RW.
If I put a 1.5GB .iso onto a DVD,
the data is put on the slowest part of the platter.
The read speed during install is dramatically
slower than if the data were on the fast/outside
part of the disk.
Is there a burning app that puts the .iso image
on the fast part of the DVD platter?
No, it would violate standards. The readers/players start reading on the
inside track.
Only thing comes to mind is to first burn some "padding file" to disk,
e.g. just an empty file filled with "0"'s would do to use up first part
of disk.

Also perhaps something can be done using the multl-session option for
burning disks, e.g. use up first part of disk on a session you discard.
mike
2018-06-18 03:27:47 UTC
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Post by Wolf K
Post by mike
I use win7 to download linux distros
and ImgBurn to create a bootable install DVD-RW.
If I put a 1.5GB .iso onto a DVD,
the data is put on the slowest part of the platter.
The read speed during install is dramatically
slower than if the data were on the fast/outside
part of the disk.
Is there a burning app that puts the .iso image
on the fast part of the DVD platter?
No, it would violate standards. The readers/players start reading on the
inside track.
You don't have to violate any standards.
Start reading wherever you have to, but edit in some
space, or dummy files.

Yes, the app would have to be smart enough to edit the .iso
on the fly to modify the file location addresses and pointers.

You should be able to do that with a .iso editor, but it's way
more work than it's worth. Seems like a nice feature for
a DVD burning app.

I watched the verification process for the linux burn.
Started out at about 2MBPS and was over 8MBPS at 1.5GB
at the end...and climbing rapidly.
Wolf K
2018-06-18 17:00:45 UTC
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Post by mike
Post by Wolf K
Post by mike
I use win7 to download linux distros
and ImgBurn to create a bootable install DVD-RW.
If I put a 1.5GB .iso onto a DVD,
the data is put on the slowest part of the platter.
The read speed during install is dramatically
slower than if the data were on the fast/outside
part of the disk.
Is there a burning app that puts the .iso image
on the fast part of the DVD platter?
No, it would violate standards. The readers/players start reading on the
inside track.
You don't have to violate any standards.
Start reading wherever you have to, but edit in some
space, or dummy files.
AFAIK, when you Open the optical disk, the reader starts reading the
"lead-in", which is at the inside of the disk. Only after the directory
has been read can you jump to any file on the disk.

[...]
--
Wolf K
kirkwood40.blogspot.com
Ethics is knowing the difference between what you have a right to do and
what is right to do. Potter Stewart
Paul
2018-06-18 18:13:05 UTC
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Post by Wolf K
Post by mike
Post by Wolf K
Post by mike
I use win7 to download linux distros
and ImgBurn to create a bootable install DVD-RW.
If I put a 1.5GB .iso onto a DVD,
the data is put on the slowest part of the platter.
The read speed during install is dramatically
slower than if the data were on the fast/outside
part of the disk.
Is there a burning app that puts the .iso image
on the fast part of the DVD platter?
No, it would violate standards. The readers/players start reading on the
inside track.
You don't have to violate any standards.
Start reading wherever you have to, but edit in some
space, or dummy files.
AFAIK, when you Open the optical disk, the reader starts reading the
"lead-in", which is at the inside of the disk. Only after the directory
has been read can you jump to any file on the disk.
[...]
Well, I like the suggestion by "pjp" to try Multi-Session.
You might be able to get it that way. The first session
will be invalidated, then the head will skip to the second
session. I've not played with Multi-Session myself and cannot
comment on operational details. You probably have to close_session
after the second write.

Paul
mike
2018-06-18 19:55:09 UTC
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Post by Paul
Post by Wolf K
Post by mike
Post by Wolf K
Post by mike
I use win7 to download linux distros
and ImgBurn to create a bootable install DVD-RW.
If I put a 1.5GB .iso onto a DVD,
the data is put on the slowest part of the platter.
The read speed during install is dramatically
slower than if the data were on the fast/outside
part of the disk.
Is there a burning app that puts the .iso image
on the fast part of the DVD platter?
No, it would violate standards. The readers/players start reading on the
inside track.
You don't have to violate any standards.
Start reading wherever you have to, but edit in some
space, or dummy files.
AFAIK, when you Open the optical disk, the reader starts reading the
"lead-in", which is at the inside of the disk. Only after the
directory has been read can you jump to any file on the disk.
I'm not suggesting you move the directory/map.
I'm suggesting that the free space be on the slow part and the
actual data be on the fast part. Might help to reduce seek time
by having an allocation table on the fast part too.
Post by Paul
Post by Wolf K
[...]
Well, I like the suggestion by "pjp" to try Multi-Session.
You might be able to get it that way. The first session
will be invalidated, then the head will skip to the second
session. I've not played with Multi-Session myself and cannot
comment on operational details. You probably have to close_session
after the second write.
Paul
The question was not whether you can cobble together a process.
The question is in the subject line. Does something already exist?
Paul
2018-06-18 22:18:14 UTC
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Post by mike
The question was not whether you can cobble together a process.
The question is in the subject line. Does something already exist?
One place to look, is in existing ISO preparation software.
While this command has "padding" for the end, it doesn't
have that concept or the concept of "offset" for the
beginning.

https://www.gnu.org/software/xorriso/man_1_xorriso.html

The command line for that, is about four lines long on your
screen. I've used that command (once) to remaster something.
It worked, but the complexity of using it will dissuade
you from using it a second time.

There might be one of the commercial GUI based programs
with such a capability, but I've never used anything commercial
for this stuff.

Paul

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