Discussion:
Win7 won't boot from eSATA dock
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mike
2018-05-02 08:48:46 UTC
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I bought an Dell Optiplex 755 SFF.
It has a dedicated eSATA port.
Hard drive I want to use is a WD 1600HLFS VelociRaptor.

I plugged in my Rosewill RDDO-13002
external eSATA docking station.
Booted macrium from USB and restored sysprepped
Win7 via eSATA.

It wouldn't boot.
I let it do it's repair diagnostics and it couldn't
fix it.
I plugged the drive directly to the motherboard eSATA
socket and let it boot and do the first boot configuration.
Works good.
Plugged it back into the Rosewill eSATA dock.
It boots as far as the swirling dots, then reboots.
On reboot, I get the repair menu.
I select "boot anyway". (or words to that effect)
It booted and ran.
That's the last time I saw it boot from the external eSATA
dock.
Keeps booting up to the swirling dots and reboots.

I booted another internal drive and did some stress
testing on the drive in the eSATA dock. No issues.

Drive still works fine if I remove the external dock
and plug the drive directly to the dedicated eSATA socket on the
motherboard. Just to be clear, it's a standard SATA socket
that's managed separately in the BIOS as eSATA.
The cable to the rear panel converts to eSATA hardware configuration.

I have zero experience trying to boot from eSATA.

Is this something that Microsoft does to inhibit
our use of the OS?

Ideas?
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-02 10:15:02 UTC
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Post by mike
I bought an Dell Optiplex 755 SFF.
It has a dedicated eSATA port.
Hard drive I want to use is a WD 1600HLFS VelociRaptor.
I plugged in my Rosewill RDDO-13002
external eSATA docking station.
Booted macrium from USB and restored sysprepped
Win7 via eSATA.
It wouldn't boot.
I let it do it's repair diagnostics and it couldn't
fix it.
I plugged the drive directly to the motherboard eSATA
socket and let it boot and do the first boot configuration.
Works good.
Plugged it back into the Rosewill eSATA dock.
It boots as far as the swirling dots, then reboots.
Your mention of "swirling dots" makes me wonder: are you talking about
Windows 10? I see you posted to the 7 'group only, and said 7 in the
subject.
Post by mike
On reboot, I get the repair menu.
I select "boot anyway". (or words to that effect)
It booted and ran.
That's the last time I saw it boot from the external eSATA
dock.
Keeps booting up to the swirling dots and reboots.
I booted another internal drive and did some stress
testing on the drive in the eSATA dock. No issues.
Drive still works fine if I remove the external dock
and plug the drive directly to the dedicated eSATA socket on the
motherboard. Just to be clear, it's a standard SATA socket
that's managed separately in the BIOS as eSATA.
The cable to the rear panel converts to eSATA hardware configuration.
I have zero experience trying to boot from eSATA.
Is this something that Microsoft does to inhibit
our use of the OS?
Ideas?
Sorry, no; I know nothing of eSATA.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

"The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's
money."
Paul
2018-05-02 14:44:19 UTC
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Post by mike
I bought an Dell Optiplex 755 SFF.
It has a dedicated eSATA port.
Hard drive I want to use is a WD 1600HLFS VelociRaptor.
I plugged in my Rosewill RDDO-13002
external eSATA docking station.
Booted macrium from USB and restored sysprepped
Win7 via eSATA.
It wouldn't boot.
I let it do it's repair diagnostics and it couldn't
fix it.
I plugged the drive directly to the motherboard eSATA
socket and let it boot and do the first boot configuration.
Works good.
Plugged it back into the Rosewill eSATA dock.
It boots as far as the swirling dots, then reboots.
On reboot, I get the repair menu.
I select "boot anyway". (or words to that effect)
It booted and ran.
That's the last time I saw it boot from the external eSATA
dock.
Keeps booting up to the swirling dots and reboots.
I booted another internal drive and did some stress
testing on the drive in the eSATA dock. No issues.
Drive still works fine if I remove the external dock
and plug the drive directly to the dedicated eSATA socket on the
motherboard. Just to be clear, it's a standard SATA socket
that's managed separately in the BIOS as eSATA.
The cable to the rear panel converts to eSATA hardware configuration.
I have zero experience trying to boot from eSATA.
Is this something that Microsoft does to inhibit
our use of the OS?
Ideas?
There are suggestions here, but nobody confirms in the
thread, that anything worked.

https://www.dell.com/community/Desktops-General/Optiplex-755-and-external-eSATA-Problem/td-p/3234958

I think Dell has something to do with this.

*******

I'd suggest this, except your symptoms don't match.
You're not getting an "inaccessible boot volume". You're
getting "swirling balls", which suggests System Reserved
was successfully found, but, by using GUID, the C: partition
is not being found. Your failure sounds "later" in the
boot process. (Windows 7 has the canned "juggler balls"
animation, while Win8/Win10 are the "ferris wheel balls".
On Windows 7, there's actually a file with a frame by frame
animation stored in a "very tall" image file.)

https://www.askvg.com/how-to-change-sata-hard-disk-mode-from-ide-to-ahci-raid-in-bios-after-installing-windows/

I would load up my Macrium emergency boot CD, and do a boot
repair with just the ESATA drive connected. To make sure that
any newly created GUIDs are "self-consistent". Then try booting.
If it doesn't boot at that point, use the Windows DVD and
use the Troubleshooting options there.

Paul
mike
2018-05-02 20:03:26 UTC
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Post by Paul
Post by mike
I bought an Dell Optiplex 755 SFF.
It has a dedicated eSATA port.
Hard drive I want to use is a WD 1600HLFS VelociRaptor.
I plugged in my Rosewill RDDO-13002
external eSATA docking station.
Booted macrium from USB and restored sysprepped
Win7 via eSATA.
It wouldn't boot.
I let it do it's repair diagnostics and it couldn't
fix it.
I plugged the drive directly to the motherboard eSATA
socket and let it boot and do the first boot configuration.
Works good.
Plugged it back into the Rosewill eSATA dock.
It boots as far as the swirling dots, then reboots.
On reboot, I get the repair menu.
I select "boot anyway". (or words to that effect)
It booted and ran.
That's the last time I saw it boot from the external eSATA
dock.
Keeps booting up to the swirling dots and reboots.
I booted another internal drive and did some stress
testing on the drive in the eSATA dock. No issues.
Drive still works fine if I remove the external dock
and plug the drive directly to the dedicated eSATA socket on the
motherboard. Just to be clear, it's a standard SATA socket
that's managed separately in the BIOS as eSATA.
The cable to the rear panel converts to eSATA hardware configuration.
I have zero experience trying to boot from eSATA.
Is this something that Microsoft does to inhibit
our use of the OS?
Ideas?
There are suggestions here, but nobody confirms in the
thread, that anything worked.
https://www.dell.com/community/Desktops-General/Optiplex-755-and-external-eSATA-Problem/td-p/3234958
I found several links like that. None seemed to match what I'm seeing.
Post by Paul
I think Dell has something to do with this.
*******
I'd suggest this, except your symptoms don't match.
You're not getting an "inaccessible boot volume". You're
getting "swirling balls", which suggests System Reserved
was successfully found,
My system doesn't have a system reserved partition.

but, by using GUID, the C: partition
Post by Paul
is not being found. Your failure sounds "later" in the
boot process. (Windows 7 has the canned "juggler balls"
animation, while Win8/Win10 are the "ferris wheel balls".
On Windows 7, there's actually a file with a frame by frame
animation stored in a "very tall" image file.)
https://www.askvg.com/how-to-change-sata-hard-disk-mode-from-ide-to-ahci-raid-in-bios-after-installing-windows/
I would load up my Macrium emergency boot CD, and do a boot
repair with just the ESATA drive connected.
That's the first thing I tried, no go.

To make sure that
Post by Paul
any newly created GUIDs are "self-consistent". Then try booting.
If it doesn't boot at that point, use the Windows DVD and
use the Troubleshooting options there.
I decided that, since the system boots/runs fine if I eliminate
the eSATA dock from the system, these issues couldn't be the problem,
but I have little experience in that area.
Post by Paul
Paul
I had restored a win7 backup.
I started over and did a fresh win7 sp1 install from the DVD.
Same boot loop.

I installed Linux Mint 16.
Boots fine from eSATA.

I installed win 10 1709 from DVD.
Boots fine from eSATA.
This install does have the system reserved partition.
I don't have a Win10 license for this machine,
so that's not a solution.

I went back and installed win7 sp1 and let windows
create the system reserved partition.
Still boot loop.

Looks like a win7 issue. Unfortunately, win7 is the only
thing I really need to work...sigh...
VanguardLH
2018-05-02 18:10:00 UTC
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Post by mike
Dell Optiplex 755 SFF.
Doing a search on that (along with adding "bios setting boot order") to
look for an online manual, I found:

https://www.manualslib.com/manual/356816/Dell-Optiplex-755.html?page=287

I suppose Dell has a copy of that computer's manual somewhere but I
wasn't going to waste time going through Dell's procedure to find it.

That page has no mention of booting from eSATA, only from internal
(primary) SATA. You are restricted to the types and order of bootable
device types by what the BIOS supports.

You'll have to move the drive off the eSATA port, take the drive out of
the external enclosure, and attach it to one of the mobo's SATA ports.
But you already knew that. Sorry, you can't boot a device type that the
BIOS doesn't support.
mike
2018-05-02 20:32:02 UTC
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Post by VanguardLH
Post by mike
Dell Optiplex 755 SFF.
Doing a search on that (along with adding "bios setting boot order") to
https://www.manualslib.com/manual/356816/Dell-Optiplex-755.html?page=287
I suppose Dell has a copy of that computer's manual somewhere but I
wasn't going to waste time going through Dell's procedure to find it.
That page has no mention of booting from eSATA, only from internal
(primary) SATA. You are restricted to the types and order of bootable
device types by what the BIOS supports.
Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.
Post by VanguardLH
You'll have to move the drive off the eSATA port, take the drive out of
the external enclosure, and attach it to one of the mobo's SATA ports.
But you already knew that.
Sorry, you can't boot a device type that the
Post by VanguardLH
BIOS doesn't support.
That's certainly correct.
But my experiments suggest that the BIOS does support booting from
eSATA. Appears to be a win7 issue.
Paul
2018-05-03 00:58:43 UTC
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Post by mike
Post by VanguardLH
Post by mike
Dell Optiplex 755 SFF.
Doing a search on that (along with adding "bios setting boot order") to
https://www.manualslib.com/manual/356816/Dell-Optiplex-755.html?page=287
I suppose Dell has a copy of that computer's manual somewhere but I
wasn't going to waste time going through Dell's procedure to find it.
That page has no mention of booting from eSATA, only from internal
(primary) SATA. You are restricted to the types and order of bootable
device types by what the BIOS supports.
Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.
Post by VanguardLH
You'll have to move the drive off the eSATA port, take the drive out of
the external enclosure, and attach it to one of the mobo's SATA ports.
But you already knew that.
Sorry, you can't boot a device type that the
Post by VanguardLH
BIOS doesn't support.
That's certainly correct.
But my experiments suggest that the BIOS does support booting from
eSATA. Appears to be a win7 issue.
Naw.

Have you looked at the motherboard at all ?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Dell-Optiplex-755-Motherboard-Small-Form-Factor-SFF-PU052/111823907433?epid=115846137&hash=item1a09396a69:g:tQ4AAOSwMTZWRxSP

That one has a Southbridge with a couple SATA ports next to it (and
some de-populated SATA connectors).

Then, it has what looks like a "VIA configuration" in the lower
right. I see two SATA connectors and one IDE connector, which
suggests a VIA chip. Or maybe a Promise chip, but my guess would
be VIA.

At the scale of that photo, I cannot guess what's on there.
But you, sitting in front of real hardware, can easily
survey the motherboard content. (I have a collection of
magnifying glasses I got from Edmund Scientific years
ago, and that's what I use to read the laser etch off
chip tops.)

I tried to search on

<model name string> dmesg

but I couldn't get any informative DMESG dumps for 755.

Have a look at the motherboard first.

Trace where the ESATA cable from the slot bracket,
runs to on the motherboard. Try moving the
ESATA cable, to a Southbridge port.

When there are add-on chips, only a few modern motherboards
have added all sorts of booting capabilities. Maybe yours
doesn't have what is needed.

A VIA chip also wouldn't have the amplitude for ESATA,
and other brands might claim to support both, but with
no apparent config bit to switch to a slightly higher
drive level. About all you can do, is use short 1 meter
ESATA cables, so you won't run out of signal budget.

How many drives are present when you do the boot experiment ?

Would the System Reserved from some internal drive be
getting picked up ?

*******

ESATA has a great many variations, and these have to do
with "powering". A laptop ESATA has only 5V power on it
(for the powered variant). A desktop ESATA has 12V power
(not sure where the 5V comes from). It's not even clear if
these were standardized or approved at all.

Is your external enclosure self-powered ? As that
will alleviate any concerns about "trying to run
a drive when there is no power for it".

Paul
mike
2018-05-03 03:34:12 UTC
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Post by Paul
Post by mike
Post by VanguardLH
Post by mike
Dell Optiplex 755 SFF.
Doing a search on that (along with adding "bios setting boot order") to
https://www.manualslib.com/manual/356816/Dell-Optiplex-755.html?page=287
I suppose Dell has a copy of that computer's manual somewhere but I
wasn't going to waste time going through Dell's procedure to find it.
That page has no mention of booting from eSATA, only from internal
(primary) SATA. You are restricted to the types and order of bootable
device types by what the BIOS supports.
Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.
Post by VanguardLH
You'll have to move the drive off the eSATA port, take the drive out of
the external enclosure, and attach it to one of the mobo's SATA ports.
But you already knew that.
Sorry, you can't boot a device type that the
Post by VanguardLH
BIOS doesn't support.
That's certainly correct.
But my experiments suggest that the BIOS does support booting from
eSATA. Appears to be a win7 issue.
Naw.
Have you looked at the motherboard at all ?
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Dell-Optiplex-755-Motherboard-Small-Form-Factor-SFF-PU052/111823907433?epid=115846137&hash=item1a09396a69:g:tQ4AAOSwMTZWRxSP
That one has a Southbridge with a couple SATA ports next to it (and
some de-populated SATA connectors).
Then, it has what looks like a "VIA configuration" in the lower
right. I see two SATA connectors and one IDE connector, which
suggests a VIA chip. Or maybe a Promise chip, but my guess would
be VIA.
Looks can be deceiving.
There is no IDE connector, that's the connector to the front panel.
There are three populated SATA connectors, SATA0, SATA1, eSATA.
All are independently managed in the BIOS.
Post by Paul
At the scale of that photo, I cannot guess what's on there.
But you, sitting in front of real hardware, can easily
survey the motherboard content. (I have a collection of
magnifying glasses I got from Edmund Scientific years
ago, and that's what I use to read the laser etch off
chip tops.)
I tried to search on
<model name string> dmesg
but I couldn't get any informative DMESG dumps for 755.
Have a look at the motherboard first.
Trace where the ESATA cable from the slot bracket,
runs to on the motherboard. Try moving the
ESATA cable, to a Southbridge port.
I've tried it on the dedicated eSATA port and SATA0
Same result.
Post by Paul
When there are add-on chips, only a few modern motherboards
have added all sorts of booting capabilities. Maybe yours
doesn't have what is needed.
A VIA chip also wouldn't have the amplitude for ESATA,
and other brands might claim to support both, but with
no apparent config bit to switch to a slightly higher
drive level. About all you can do, is use short 1 meter
ESATA cables, so you won't run out of signal budget.
I'm using a short eSATA cable.
Post by Paul
How many drives are present when you do the boot experiment ?
One hard drive on either SATA0 or eSATA and one DVD-ROM on SATA1
Post by Paul
Would the System Reserved from some internal drive be
getting picked up ?
There is no other drive from which to pick up anything.
Post by Paul
*******
ESATA has a great many variations, and these have to do
with "powering". A laptop ESATA has only 5V power on it
(for the powered variant). A desktop ESATA has 12V power
(not sure where the 5V comes from). It's not even clear if
these were standardized or approved at all.
Is your external enclosure self-powered ?
YES
As that
Post by Paul
will alleviate any concerns about "trying to run
a drive when there is no power for it".
Paul
My reply from 1:03 PM today describes more recent experiments
where only win7 fails to boot from eSATA connected to external dock.
The hardware seems to be reliable for linux and windows 10.
Paul
2018-05-03 06:13:34 UTC
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Post by mike
My reply from 1:03 PM today describes more recent experiments
where only win7 fails to boot from eSATA connected to external dock.
The hardware seems to be reliable for linux and windows 10.
What I can't figure out, is why isn't it throwing
an "Inaccessible boot volume" blue screen error ?

If there was a driver mismatch, like Win7 had previously
selected an IDE (pciide.sys) driver, and suddenly it
was faced with an AHCI/RAID setting, then it should
give an "Inaccessible boot volume", in which case
you'd track down a recipe to change the "Start" value
to the driver from 3->0. And that "re-arms" the driver
so the driver type can be checked at boot. That's different
than WinXP, where on WinXP you were basically screwed
if the storage port definition, didn't match the
driver lineup. Win7 has in-box IDE, AHCI, RAID drivers,
but it doesn't "try" all of them on each boot cycle.
After the OS boots initially, is uses the barest
subset of drivers to bring the system up.

The re-arm procedure, of changing the Start registry
key for the driver, makes the OS "re-consider" the driver
on the next restart. The method may also differ, between
the modern OSes (might not be the same procedure exactly
for each one).

But I don't want to put you to all this trouble, unless
you're seeing a 7b error.

http://aumha.org/a/stop.htm (7b Inaccessible Boot Volume)

If you wanted a registry editor, recent versions of
Kaspersky offline scanner disc, include a Linux registry
editor. It's possible that tool is portable and can be
moved to other LiveCDs if you wanted.

Normally, people change the Start value, shut down the
computer, change BIOS storage settings, and try to boot. So
they do online registry editing, as opposed to offline
registry editing.

If I was doing it, I would make sure Start is set to zero,
for both IDE and AHCI for example. That way, if you forget
to change the BIOS setting right after that, it still comes
up, the way it did originally. By arming two drivers, you're
ready for both the "before" and "after" BIOS setting.

I must be missing a symptom here, because I can't tell
if this is an Inaccessible Boot Volume or not. It seems
strange that some completely unrelated issue has popped up
to prevent it from booting. Somehow, we need to confirm
what the problem is.

Paul
mike
2018-05-03 09:53:52 UTC
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Post by Paul
Post by mike
My reply from 1:03 PM today describes more recent experiments
where only win7 fails to boot from eSATA connected to external dock.
The hardware seems to be reliable for linux and windows 10.
What I can't figure out, is why isn't it throwing
an "Inaccessible boot volume" blue screen error ?
You're a lot more experienced than I am. Perhaps I'm not
using the right terms...
I have never seen what I would call a 'blue screen error'
anywhere in this setup. No actual blue color, no error message,
no nothing.

When I boot win7 from the external eSATA, I get the normal BIOS
messages, the initial start of windows 7 with the colored balls
swirling around. Then the balls stop moving. A second or so later,
a reboot. No error messages at all.

I did see, one time only, an "Inaccessible boot volume"
but was in the middle of an experimental flurry. I can't be more
descriptive.
Post by Paul
If there was a driver mismatch, like Win7 had previously
selected an IDE (pciide.sys) driver, and suddenly it
was faced with an AHCI/RAID setting, then it should
give an "Inaccessible boot volume", in which case
you'd track down a recipe to change the "Start" value
to the driver from 3->0. And that "re-arms" the driver
so the driver type can be checked at boot. That's different
than WinXP, where on WinXP you were basically screwed
if the storage port definition, didn't match the
driver lineup. Win7 has in-box IDE, AHCI, RAID drivers,
but it doesn't "try" all of them on each boot cycle.
After the OS boots initially, is uses the barest
subset of drivers to bring the system up.
The re-arm procedure, of changing the Start registry
key for the driver, makes the OS "re-consider" the driver
on the next restart. The method may also differ, between
the modern OSes (might not be the same procedure exactly
for each one).
But I don't want to put you to all this trouble, unless
you're seeing a 7b error.
Let's go back to the first attempt.
I have a sysprepped win7 SP1 macrium backup.
I've used it dozens of times to initialize/test computers.
I've never ever had any problems with it until this eSATA attempt.
It's my understanding that sysprep generalize does force
reinitialization of drivers. I've restored it to many computers
of different vintage without issue as long as native win7 drivers
exist. It takes me through the oobe setup at first boot.
Is that not sufficient to resolve driver issues?
Post by Paul
http://aumha.org/a/stop.htm (7b Inaccessible Boot Volume)
If you wanted a registry editor, recent versions of
Kaspersky offline scanner disc, include a Linux registry
editor. It's possible that tool is portable and can be
moved to other LiveCDs if you wanted.
Normally, people change the Start value, shut down the
computer, change BIOS storage settings, and try to boot. So
they do online registry editing, as opposed to offline
registry editing.
If I was doing it, I would make sure Start is set to zero,
for both IDE and AHCI for example. That way, if you forget
to change the BIOS setting right after that, it still comes
up, the way it did originally. By arming two drivers, you're
ready for both the "before" and "after" BIOS setting.
I must be missing a symptom here, because I can't tell
if this is an Inaccessible Boot Volume or not. It seems
strange that some completely unrelated issue has popped up
to prevent it from booting. Somehow, we need to confirm
what the problem is.
Paul
I'm beginning to think that this is a lost cause.
The intent of this system is to be able to
install/boot/run/backup/restore
any OS from/to eSATA using the external drive dock.
It needs to just work without modifying anything.
If it doesn't, it's useless for the intended purpose.
I need to find a different computer or different external eSATA dock.

It's been very frustrating that linux and win10 both work fine.
The license keys I have are for win7.
It's always something.

I could easily do what I want with two internal SATA drive docks
and a DVD. But I don't have a box that has three front panel slots
and is still short enough to fit the available space.
Paul
2018-05-03 17:02:32 UTC
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Post by mike
When I boot win7 from the external eSATA, I get the normal BIOS
messages, the initial start of windows 7 with the colored balls
swirling around. Then the balls stop moving. A second or so later,
a reboot. No error messages at all.
And that's because, in the System control panel, you haven't
disabled Automatic Restarts.

If there is a BSOD at startup, the system will attempt to automatically
restart. With the drive plugged into a regular SATA port, bring
that disk back up and disable Automatic Restarts. And then you
should get a 0x7b error indicating "Inaccessible Boot Volume".

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/2621246/how-to-resolve-automatic-restarts-problem-when-windows-7-experiences-a

The box shown in this diagram should be unticked.

https://msegceporticoprodassets.blob.core.windows.net/asset-blobs/4056019_en_1

All this will succeed in doing, is verifying the problem is the
usage of the wrong driver. It'll still be up to you to figure out
what driver should have been used, and change the "Start" item to 0
on that driver, so the OS actually attempts to use the driver.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\pciide\Start <== 0
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\msahci\Start <== 0
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\iaStorV\Start <== 0
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\iaStor\Start <== 0

The names of those change from OS to OS, so you must verify the details
for yourself in each case of needing to do that.

You could set the drive up such that it boots again without the ESATA,
do the registry changes, shut down, then plug it into the ESATA
and see if it comes up. Once it comes up, you can inspect any
logs for evidence of what the OS decided to do. (On WinXP you'd use
setupapi.log as a source of evidence, but later OSes reduce the utility
of that log.)

At least some web article claimed you could get the OS into the
right state, by making a traversal to Safe Mode to re-arm the
drivers. I've never tried that.

I think I have used re-arm a few times in the past, but haven't
used it recently. Initially, this was a "novelty" compared
to the complete meltdown that such a situation would cause
in WinXP. Fixing a 0x7b on Windows 7 should be a little bit
easier.

Paul
mike
2018-05-03 20:00:48 UTC
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Post by Paul
Post by mike
When I boot win7 from the external eSATA, I get the normal BIOS
messages, the initial start of windows 7 with the colored balls
swirling around. Then the balls stop moving. A second or so later,
a reboot. No error messages at all.
And that's because, in the System control panel, you haven't
disabled Automatic Restarts.
If there is a BSOD at startup, the system will attempt to automatically
restart. With the drive plugged into a regular SATA port, bring
that disk back up and disable Automatic Restarts. And then you
should get a 0x7b error indicating "Inaccessible Boot Volume".
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/2621246/how-to-resolve-automatic-restarts-problem-when-windows-7-experiences-a
The box shown in this diagram should be unticked.
https://msegceporticoprodassets.blob.core.windows.net/asset-blobs/4056019_en_1
All this will succeed in doing, is verifying the problem is the
usage of the wrong driver. It'll still be up to you to figure out
what driver should have been used, and change the "Start" item to 0
on that driver, so the OS actually attempts to use the driver.
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\pciide\Start
<== 0
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\msahci\Start
<== 0
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\iaStorV\Start <== 0
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\iaStor\Start
<== 0
The names of those change from OS to OS, so you must verify the details
for yourself in each case of needing to do that.
You could set the drive up such that it boots again without the ESATA,
do the registry changes, shut down, then plug it into the ESATA
and see if it comes up. Once it comes up, you can inspect any
logs for evidence of what the OS decided to do. (On WinXP you'd use
setupapi.log as a source of evidence, but later OSes reduce the utility
of that log.)
At least some web article claimed you could get the OS into the
right state, by making a traversal to Safe Mode to re-arm the
drivers. I've never tried that.
I have tried safe mode. The screen shows a lot of drivers
getting loaded, then just stops in the middle. I didn't have
any idea what to do with that information. Even if I did
understand, there's nothing I can do about it within the parameters
of my objective: it has to just work without intervention of any kind.
Post by Paul
I think I have used re-arm a few times in the past, but haven't
used it recently. Initially, this was a "novelty" compared
to the complete meltdown that such a situation would cause
in WinXP. Fixing a 0x7b on Windows 7 should be a little bit
easier.
Paul
I very much appreciate your willingness to dive deep into this issue.
I fear I'm wasting your time.
While the info you presented here is educational, it doesn't address
the real problem.

I MUST be able to install anything I want onto the eSATA docked drive
and have it just work without any configuration intervention.
This is a test system that must JUST WORK.

Some history/context.

I have a test system (optiplex 360) with an internal Win7 drive and a
plugin SATA drive
socket.
I use the plugin socket most of the time to run/test software.
I have plugin drives for win2K/XP/Vista/Win7/Win10, several linux
distros and android. I can experiment with software without corrupting my
internal drive. If I like the software, I'll commit it to the
appropriate system.
That test system does exactly what I want except when a new install
tries to take over the stuff on the internal disk.

I updated my plugin win10 drive to win10-1803.
The update went fine, but it trashed my internal win7 drive.
I was able to boot macrium rescue and fix the win7 boot issue,
but one of the partitions was also trashed. I tried to fix it
with chkdsk, but chkdsk ran amok and was copying a security
descriptor to every sector. I shut it off after an hour and
reformatted/recovered that partition.

The obvious fix is to unload a shelf, wrangle the side cover off and
disconnect the internal drive when installing/updating OS via the plugin
socket. There's no room in the case for two plugin drive docks.
I can do many things with a USB-connected external drive, but
installing a windows OS isn't one of them. I have an eSATA
card I could plug into this system, if I had a free card slot.

I've become sufficiently
annoyed that I think I'm gonna add a front panel switch that interrupts
power to the internal drive. I was gonna interrupt both +5V and +12V,
but I'm wondering if just cutting ONE of the supplies would work
without damaging the drive or motherboard. Any input on that?

On Tuesday, I found this Optiplex 755 at a thrift store.
It has an external eSATA port that I'd hoped would solve my
OS interaction problems without having to tear apart the case every time.
At the start of this thread, I thought there might be something
I was doing wrong that could address the issue. Subsequent
experiments suggest that the hardware is working fine and
there's nothing to be done to make win7 load/work without
a bunch of fiddling.
It doesn't work for win7 and I don't have a license
for win10. Time to put it on the pile of "close, but no cigar"
projects.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-03 08:48:18 UTC
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In message <pce01s$6gq$***@dont-email.me>, mike <***@netzero.net>
writes:
[]
Post by mike
I've tried it on the dedicated eSATA port and SATA0
Same result.
[]
So it's not just the eSATA that's the problem as stated in the subject?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If you're playing a killer monster, be very quiet. -
Anthony Hopkins, RT 2016/10/22-28
mike
2018-05-03 10:25:00 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by mike
I've tried it on the dedicated eSATA port and SATA0
Same result.
[]
So it's not just the eSATA that's the problem as stated in the subject?
Problem is win7 with the eSATA (powered) external dock connected to either
SATA0 or eSATA sockets on the motherboard.

Win 7 SATA drive connected directly to either SATA0 or eSATA motherboard
socket WITHOUT
using the external dock works fine.

Windows 10 and linux work fine no matter which of the motherboard
sockets with or without the external eSATA dock.

There seem to be no logical differences between any of the three
motherboard SATA ports. Paul suggests that the port labeled for eSATA
may have higher drive levels.

The subject line is correct.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-03 13:02:08 UTC
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Post by mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by mike
I've tried it on the dedicated eSATA port and SATA0
Same result.
[]
So it's not just the eSATA that's the problem as stated in the subject?
Problem is win7 with the eSATA (powered) external dock connected to either
SATA0 or eSATA sockets on the motherboard.
Win 7 SATA drive connected directly to either SATA0 or eSATA motherboard
socket WITHOUT
using the external dock works fine.
Windows 10 and linux work fine no matter which of the motherboard
sockets with or without the external eSATA dock.
There seem to be no logical differences between any of the three
motherboard SATA ports. Paul suggests that the port labeled for eSATA
may have higher drive levels.
The subject line is correct.
But incomplete (-:, as it also won't boot from SATA0 _if_ using the
dock. Will it from SATA1, or isn't there such?

So the problem _combination_ seems to be

o external dock rather than drive connected directly to SATA
o connected to SATA (I think you said it's fine when connected to USB?)
o Windows 7.

Changing ANY one of those three seems to fix it - right?
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Whoever decided to limit tagline length to 68 characters can kiss my
mike
2018-05-03 20:24:06 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
[]
Post by mike
I've tried it on the dedicated eSATA port and SATA0
Same result.
[]
So it's not just the eSATA that's the problem as stated in the subject?
Problem is win7 with the eSATA (powered) external dock connected to either
SATA0 or eSATA sockets on the motherboard.
Win 7 SATA drive connected directly to either SATA0 or eSATA motherboard
socket WITHOUT
using the external dock works fine.
Windows 10 and linux work fine no matter which of the motherboard
sockets with or without the external eSATA dock.
There seem to be no logical differences between any of the three
motherboard SATA ports. Paul suggests that the port labeled for eSATA
may have higher drive levels.
The subject line is correct.
But incomplete (-:, as it also won't boot from SATA0 _if_ using the
dock. Will it from SATA1, or isn't there such?
I haven't actually tried SATA1. It's used for the DVD.

Well, we can nitpick the subject line, or we could address the problem.
Fixing the problem described in the subject line is what I need.
Everything else is collateral diagnostic information.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
So the problem _combination_ seems to be
o external dock rather than drive connected directly to SATA
yes, per the subject line.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
o connected to SATA (I think you said it's fine when connected to USB?)
The drive works fine connected directly to SATA without the dock.
The dock has USB, but I'm not using it in this case. I'm using the eSATA
port on the external docking station.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
o Windows 7.
Yes, per the subject line.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Changing ANY one of those three seems to fix it - right?
Nothing fixes the problem described in the subject line.

Win7 boots if I don't use the external eSATA docking station.
Using the external docking station won't boot windows 7.
Using the external docking station with win10 or linux boots fine.

I haven't mentioned it before, but I did update the BIOS to the
latest version with no improvement in the boot situation.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-03 21:13:37 UTC
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[]
Post by mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by mike
The subject line is correct.
But incomplete (-:, as it also won't boot from SATA0 _if_ using the
dock. Will it from SATA1, or isn't there such?
I haven't actually tried SATA1. It's used for the DVD.
(Might be worth a try? Or SATA2, 3, ...)
Post by mike
Well, we can nitpick the subject line, or we could address the problem.
Fixing the problem described in the subject line is what I need.
Everything else is collateral diagnostic information.
You have since stated that it also won't boot Windows 7 using the
docking station connected to SATA0, so eSATA is not necessary for the
problem still to show. This may be useful information and thus
important.

(Have you a different _model_ of dock you could try?)
Post by mike
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
So the problem _combination_ seems to be
o external dock rather than drive connected directly to SATA
yes, per the subject line.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
o connected to SATA (I think you said it's fine when connected to USB?)
The drive works fine connected directly to SATA without the dock.
The dock has USB, but I'm not using it in this case. I'm using the eSATA
port on the external docking station.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
o Windows 7.
Yes, per the subject line.
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Changing ANY one of those three seems to fix it - right?
Nothing fixes the problem described in the subject line.
Yes - three factors: 7, docking station, and one other (which can be
eSATA or SATA0).
[]
Post by mike
I haven't mentioned it before, but I did update the BIOS to the
latest version with no improvement in the boot situation.
Useful info.
You've got a strange one there, given that it _will_ boot W10!
3
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Bread is lovely, don't get me wrong. But it's not cake. Or it's rubbish cake.
I always thought that bread needed more sugar and some icing. - Sarah Millican
(Radio Times 11-17 May 2013)
Char Jackson
2018-05-03 22:37:09 UTC
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Post by mike
Nothing fixes the problem described in the subject line.
Win7 boots if I don't use the external eSATA docking station.
Using the external docking station won't boot windows 7.
Using the external docking station with win10 or linux boots fine.
I think everyone's waiting to hear what the error message is when Win 7
won't boot. As Paul suggested, disable the automatic restart so you can
see what's going on. Alternatively, use BlueScreenView from nirsoft.net
to see the details of multiple recent crashes. It's possible that
they'll all have the same root cause, but you never know until you look.
--
Char Jackson
mike
2018-05-04 00:42:57 UTC
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Post by Char Jackson
Post by mike
Nothing fixes the problem described in the subject line.
Win7 boots if I don't use the external eSATA docking station.
Using the external docking station won't boot windows 7.
Using the external docking station with win10 or linux boots fine.
I think everyone's waiting to hear what the error message is when Win 7
won't boot.
I've described it several times.
Power on the computer.
Bios spits out some text
Wait
Swirling colored balls indicate that something related to win7
is being read
from the eSATA connected drive via the external dock.
Wait.
Swirling balls stop swirling.
Wait.
System starts again.
No bluescreen.
No text.
No nothin.
Rinse and repeat.

As Paul suggested, disable the automatic restart so you can
Post by Char Jackson
see what's going on.
OK, if the system is hung, where would I look to see what is going on?
And if I don't have the option to change anything, what's the point.
Alternatively, use BlueScreenView from nirsoft.net
OK, how do I execute bluescreenview on a system that won't boot?
Post by Char Jackson
to see the details of multiple recent crashes. It's possible that
they'll all have the same root cause, but you never know until you look.
I appreciate the help, but it's not helpful.

I intend to use this system to install win7 onto a hard drive via the
external eSATA dock...more than once.

Unless there's a solution like, "hold the control key while booting",
this computer won't do what I need done. I don't have the desire
to make any, none, not even a little bit of change to the software
that's on the win7 install DVD. The whole idea is to put virgin
software on virgin hardware for testing.

Turns out that the internal hard drive mounting bracket only cost
about as much as the computer, so I ordered one.
Shoulda waited 'till I cancelled the project.

We should let this thread die.
But thanks for trying to help.
Char Jackson
2018-05-04 15:16:40 UTC
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Post by mike
Post by Char Jackson
Post by mike
Nothing fixes the problem described in the subject line.
Win7 boots if I don't use the external eSATA docking station.
Using the external docking station won't boot windows 7.
Using the external docking station with win10 or linux boots fine.
I think everyone's waiting to hear what the error message is when Win 7
won't boot.
I've described it several times.
You're describing a sequence of events, but you're not providing any
error or crash info. We're trying to help you to do that because you
have to know what the issue is before you have a reasonable chance of
fixing it. See below for steps...
Post by mike
Power on the computer.
Bios spits out some text
Wait
Swirling colored balls indicate that something related to win7
is being read
from the eSATA connected drive via the external dock.
Wait.
Swirling balls stop swirling.
Wait.
System starts again.
No bluescreen.
No text.
No nothin.
Rinse and repeat.
From above, "System starts again" indicates that you have your PC set to
automatically restart after a crash. I believe that's the default, but
it's not a very helpful setting. You can change it by going to
Computer -> Properties -> Advanced System Settings -> find the Startup
and Recovery section (3rd section on that dialog), click Settings, look
halfway down at the System Failure section, find the "Automatically
restart" item, and clear the checkbox on the left. OK your way out.

The result is that any future crash will leave the system at the blue
screen so you can see the error/crash details.

An alternative way to get to that "Automatically restart" setting is to
go to Control Panel -> System and drill down from there.
Post by mike
As Paul suggested, disable the automatic restart so you can
Post by Char Jackson
see what's going on.
OK, if the system is hung, where would I look to see what is going on?
You're able to boot into Win 7, so you do it then. Once "Automatically
restart" is disabled, you can go back to your eSATA dock exercise and
try to boot. You should then see the blue screen and all of its info.
Post by mike
And if I don't have the option to change anything, what's the point.
Alternatively, use BlueScreenView from nirsoft.net
OK, how do I execute bluescreenview on a system that won't boot?
If you don't want to disable the "Automatically restart" option, you can
run BlueScreenView after the fact, once you're back in Win 7. It will
find and display the dumps created by each of the previous boot
failures. It shows you the blue screens that you never saw because your
system was automatically restarting.
--
Char Jackson
Java Jive
2018-05-04 15:32:55 UTC
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Post by Char Jackson
From above, "System starts again" indicates that you have your PC set to
automatically restart after a crash. I believe that's the default, but
it's not a very helpful setting. You can change it by going to
Computer -> Properties -> Advanced System Settings -> find the Startup
and Recovery section (3rd section on that dialog), click Settings, look
halfway down at the System Failure section, find the "Automatically
restart" item, and clear the checkbox on the left. OK your way out.
The result is that any future crash will leave the system at the blue
screen so you can see the error/crash details.
Post by mike
OK, how do I execute bluescreenview on a system that won't boot?
If you don't want to disable the "Automatically restart" option, you can
run BlueScreenView after the fact, once you're back in Win 7. It will
find and display the dumps created by each of the previous boot
failures. It shows you the blue screens that you never saw because your
system was automatically restarting.
But none of that helps him get into his system as it is now!

The way I got over this when last asked to investigate a PC that was
endlessly rebooting like this, was to video the screen with my
smartphone, and then step slowly through the video and freeze it on the
blue screen, enabling me to read it - it was a hard disk error.

Whether this will work for the OP, who hasn't mentioned seeing a flash
of blue, I don't know, but it's easy enough to do and got to be worth a
try first off. Before beginning, make sure the screen has no
reflections from ambient lighting that might obscure any error messages
that get thrown up.

As others have said, the default setting of rebooting automatically
after a blue screen is one of the most idiotic defaults among the many
that Microsoft impose upon hapless users. The moment you get back into
the system, change it to pause after a boot error, as per the
instructions already given by others.
Char Jackson
2018-05-04 16:07:46 UTC
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Post by Java Jive
Post by Char Jackson
From above, "System starts again" indicates that you have your PC set to
automatically restart after a crash. I believe that's the default, but
it's not a very helpful setting. You can change it by going to
Computer -> Properties -> Advanced System Settings -> find the Startup
and Recovery section (3rd section on that dialog), click Settings, look
halfway down at the System Failure section, find the "Automatically
restart" item, and clear the checkbox on the left. OK your way out.
The result is that any future crash will leave the system at the blue
screen so you can see the error/crash details.
Post by mike
OK, how do I execute bluescreenview on a system that won't boot?
If you don't want to disable the "Automatically restart" option, you can
run BlueScreenView after the fact, once you're back in Win 7. It will
find and display the dumps created by each of the previous boot
failures. It shows you the blue screens that you never saw because your
system was automatically restarting.
But none of that helps him get into his system as it is now!
My impression is that he can boot into Win 7 anytime he wants by simply
connecting to the SATA0 port rather than the eSATA port. Some of the
info he provides is confusing, so I could be wrong.

If he can boot into Win 7 by connecting the drive to SATA0, he can
either make the change to disable automatic restarts, or he can run
BlueScreenView to see all of the previous crash info.
--
Char Jackson
Paul
2018-05-04 16:09:11 UTC
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Post by Java Jive
Post by Char Jackson
From above, "System starts again" indicates that you have your PC set to
automatically restart after a crash. I believe that's the default, but
it's not a very helpful setting. You can change it by going to
Computer -> Properties -> Advanced System Settings -> find the Startup
and Recovery section (3rd section on that dialog), click Settings, look
halfway down at the System Failure section, find the "Automatically
restart" item, and clear the checkbox on the left. OK your way out.
The result is that any future crash will leave the system at the blue
screen so you can see the error/crash details.
Post by mike
OK, how do I execute bluescreenview on a system that won't boot?
If you don't want to disable the "Automatically restart" option, you can
run BlueScreenView after the fact, once you're back in Win 7. It will
find and display the dumps created by each of the previous boot
failures. It shows you the blue screens that you never saw because your
system was automatically restarting.
But none of that helps him get into his system as it is now!
The way I got over this when last asked to investigate a PC that was
endlessly rebooting like this, was to video the screen with my
smartphone, and then step slowly through the video and freeze it on the
blue screen, enabling me to read it - it was a hard disk error.
Whether this will work for the OP, who hasn't mentioned seeing a flash
of blue, I don't know, but it's easy enough to do and got to be worth a
try first off. Before beginning, make sure the screen has no
reflections from ambient lighting that might obscure any error messages
that get thrown up.
As others have said, the default setting of rebooting automatically
after a blue screen is one of the most idiotic defaults among the many
that Microsoft impose upon hapless users. The moment you get back into
the system, change it to pause after a boot error, as per the
instructions already given by others.
That's why I specifically suggests changing the Automatically Restart
setting. If an OP reports seeing a "blue screen flash",
then I'd suggest shooting video and scrolling through
it slowly in a video editor until you can see the
error number.

But with no indication of a blue screen or the flashing thing,
booting it using the internal SATA cable, changing the system
setting, putting it back in the ESATA case, should make the blue
screen (BSOD) stay on the screen forever. No video needed.

The ESATA bracket in that system, can be plugged into the
Southbridge, or into some addon chip. There is an addon chip,
like maybe a VIA chip or a JMB361, that a user could plug
the bracket into its SATA port. As long as the OS
has the driver for *both* pieces of hardware, it should
have worked.

If the ESATA adapter plate was plugged into a Southbridge
port, then while the disk is booted on a SATA port,
you could set all these to zero, then shutdown and
move the disk back to the external ESATA casing. This
should be enough to cover anything Intel can throw at you.
I don't know how a VIA or JMB361 would be handled,
with respect to this issue.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\pciide\Start <== 0
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\msahci\Start <== 0
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\iaStorV\Start <== 0
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\services\iaStor\Start <== 0

The situation here is "debug-able" since the OP appears to
be able to boot the disk in question, by putting it
back on an internal SATA port. Presumably the Intel
Southbridge SATA port.

The purpose of debugging problems, isn't always "local optimization".
Sometimes you want to succeed at it, so you can handle the problem
the *next* time it happens. And then you know what to do.

Paul
mike
2018-05-05 05:31:48 UTC
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Post by Char Jackson
Post by mike
Post by Char Jackson
Post by mike
Nothing fixes the problem described in the subject line.
Win7 boots if I don't use the external eSATA docking station.
Using the external docking station won't boot windows 7.
Using the external docking station with win10 or linux boots fine.
I think everyone's waiting to hear what the error message is when Win 7
won't boot.
I've described it several times.
You're describing a sequence of events, but you're not providing any
error or crash info. We're trying to help you to do that because you
have to know what the issue is before you have a reasonable chance of
fixing it. See below for steps...
Post by mike
Power on the computer.
Bios spits out some text
Wait
Swirling colored balls indicate that something related to win7
is being read
from the eSATA connected drive via the external dock.
Wait.
Swirling balls stop swirling.
Wait.
System starts again.
No bluescreen.
No text.
No nothin.
Rinse and repeat.
From above, "System starts again" indicates that you have your PC set to
automatically restart after a crash. I believe that's the default, but
it's not a very helpful setting. You can change it by going to
Computer -> Properties -> Advanced System Settings -> find the Startup
and Recovery section (3rd section on that dialog), click Settings, look
halfway down at the System Failure section, find the "Automatically
restart" item, and clear the checkbox on the left. OK your way out.
The result is that any future crash will leave the system at the blue
screen so you can see the error/crash details.
An alternative way to get to that "Automatically restart" setting is to
go to Control Panel -> System and drill down from there.
Ok, but there's no display, keyboard, mouse to do that.
Post by Char Jackson
Post by mike
As Paul suggested, disable the automatic restart so you can
Post by Char Jackson
see what's going on.
Ok, I put the drive back into the computer and booted it.
I unchecked the automatically restart box.
I also unchecked the overwrite existing dump files.

Stuck the drive back into the external dock.
Boot stops with blue screen.
Error *7B
0xFFFFF88009A9928
0xFFFFFFFFC0000034
0x0000000000000000,0X0000000000000000,(0X0000000000000000)

I may have miscounted the zeros or F's...I expected the strings
to be the same length.

Restarted the system and let windows diagnose.
Can't repair, nothing useful in the details.

Stuck drive back into the computer.
Boots to failed to restart, let it try startup repair, nothing found.
Only thing interesting in the report is
Problem Signature 04 21197968.

Next boot was successful.

I searched the drive for MEMORY.DMP
Nothing found.
I did an eyeball search of the
root directory and the windows
directory to look for anything interesting.
Nothing stood out.

I have no experience deciphering system logs, but I went
foraging anyway.
Lots of information messages.

The only errors I found were from different instances of
attempted reboots. Not clear which, if any, happened while
the drive was in the external dock. I should have been better
documenting the time of each reboot.
start of errors:

Application error WMI


Event filter with query "SELECT * FROM __InstanceModificationEvent
WITHIN 60 WHERE TargetInstance ISA "Win32_Processor"
AND TargetInstance.LoadPercentage > 99" could not be reactivated in
namespace "//./root/CIMV2" because of error 0x80041003.
Events cannot be delivered through this filter until the problem is
corrected.

- <Event xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/win/2004/08/events/event">
- <System>
<Provider Name="Microsoft-Windows-WMI"
Guid="{1edeee53-0afe-4609-b846-d8c0b2075b1f}" EventSourceName="WinMgmt" />
<EventID Qualifiers="49152">10</EventID>
<Version>0</Version>
<Level>2</Level>
<Task>0</Task>
<Opcode>0</Opcode>
<Keywords>0x80000000000000</Keywords>
<TimeCreated SystemTime="2018-05-05T02:40:57.000000000Z" />
<EventRecordID>313</EventRecordID>
<Correlation />
<Execution ProcessID="0" ThreadID="0" />
<Channel>Application</Channel>
<Computer>mike2-PC</Computer>
<Security />
</System>
- <EventData>
<Data>//./root/CIMV2</Data>
<Data>SELECT * FROM __InstanceModificationEvent WITHIN 60 WHERE
TargetInstance ISA "Win32_Processor" AND TargetInstance.LoadPercentage >
99</Data>
<Data>0x80041003</Data>
</EventData>
</Event>


**************************************



+ System

- Provider

[ Name] Microsoft-Windows-WMI
[ Guid] {1edeee53-0afe-4609-b846-d8c0b2075b1f}
[ EventSourceName] WinMgmt

- EventID 10

[ Qualifiers] 49152

Version 0

Level 2

Task 0

Opcode 0

Keywords 0x80000000000000

- TimeCreated

[ SystemTime] 2018-05-05T02:01:54.000000000Z

EventRecordID 171

Correlation

- Execution

[ ProcessID] 0
[ ThreadID] 0

Channel Application

Computer mike2-PC

Security

********************************************************************************************

- EventData

//./root/CIMV2
SELECT * FROM __InstanceModificationEvent WITHIN 60 WHERE
TargetInstance ISA "Win32_Processor" AND TargetInstance.LoadPercentage > 99
0x80041003


- <Event xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/win/2004/08/events/event">
- <System>
<Provider Name="Microsoft-Windows-WMI"
Guid="{1edeee53-0afe-4609-b846-d8c0b2075b1f}" EventSourceName="WinMgmt" />
<EventID Qualifiers="49152">10</EventID>
<Version>0</Version>
<Level>2</Level>
<Task>0</Task>
<Opcode>0</Opcode>
<Keywords>0x80000000000000</Keywords>
<TimeCreated SystemTime="2018-05-05T02:40:57.000000000Z" />
<EventRecordID>313</EventRecordID>
<Correlation />
<Execution ProcessID="0" ThreadID="0" />
<Channel>Application</Channel>
<Computer>mike2-PC</Computer>
<Security />
</System>
- <EventData>
<Data>//./root/CIMV2</Data>
<Data>SELECT * FROM __InstanceModificationEvent WITHIN 60 WHERE
TargetInstance ISA "Win32_Processor" AND TargetInstance.LoadPercentage >
99</Data>
<Data>0x80041003</Data>
</EventData>
</Event>

end of errors

Not clear which boot of which configuration corresponds to those errors.

NOW FOR ANOTHER TWIST...

After all the messing around above, I plugged the eSATA dock back
into SATA0. It wouldn't boot. Boot drive not found.
Checking the BIOS, SATA0 does indeed recognize
the eSATA dock with the correct drive.
Tried reboot again. Boot drive not found.
Tried powering up in different sequences...boot drive not found.

Plugged the eSATA dock back into the onboard eSATA socket.
The damn thing boots from the eSATA dock. That's the second
time I've seen that happen.
Rebooted.
Back into boot failure mode.

I like a treasure hunt as much as anybody.
But, for me, there's no treasure here.

This computer with this docking station has to work reliably,
EXACTLY the same with an internal drive and that same drive plugged
into the external eSATA docking station for any/all operating systems...
EVERY TIME. I don't need more unknowns.

Unless there's a PERSISTENT solution that can be applied to the
computer hardware or the docking station, the computer needs to go into
the junk pile. It is UNFIT for my desired application. Knowing
why doesn't help if I can't fix it.

I wasted $13. It's the risk I take when buying
junk computers. I'm moving on to the next junk computer. ;-)

Thanks for trying to help.
Post by Char Jackson
Post by mike
OK, if the system is hung, where would I look to see what is going on?
You're able to boot into Win 7, so you do it then. Once "Automatically
restart" is disabled, you can go back to your eSATA dock exercise and
try to boot. You should then see the blue screen and all of its info.
Post by mike
And if I don't have the option to change anything, what's the point.
Alternatively, use BlueScreenView from nirsoft.net
OK, how do I execute bluescreenview on a system that won't boot?
If you don't want to disable the "Automatically restart" option, you can
run BlueScreenView after the fact, once you're back in Win 7. It will
find and display the dumps created by each of the previous boot
failures. It shows you the blue screens that you never saw because your
system was automatically restarting.
Paul
2018-05-05 05:59:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by mike
Stuck the drive back into the external dock.
Boot stops with blue screen.
Error *7B
0xFFFFF88009A9928
0xFFFFFFFFC0000034
0x0000000000000000,0X0000000000000000,(0X0000000000000000)
I wasted $13. It's the risk I take when buying
junk computers. I'm moving on to the next junk computer. ;-)
Thanks for trying to help.
So it's an inaccessible boot volume, and it needs (some) driver.

When you look in Device Manager, while the disk is booted on
a regular SATA port, which hardwares don't currently have
drivers in Device Manager ?

When you booted Linux and everything was ticking over, did
Linux provide any info about that port ? While DMESG shows
some info, I don't know if it'll tell you enough to conclude
what kind of Windows driver needs to be added to the
Windows OS.

Now, you've learned two things you can use the next time.

1) How to prevent the thing from instantly rebooting when
the notion enters its mind. Yes, the video camera method
works - I've used it to freeze the single frame of BSOD
before it disappears from the screen. But with the
tick box method of stopping it, you can examine the
error message at leisure.

2) That a 0x7B indicates the OS is missing a driver.
The BIOS provides an INT 0x13 disk read routine, which
is how the booting process first starts reading the disk.
However, there is a "handoff" point, where the thing
switches from BIOS "drivers" to actual OS drivers. And
that's the time the Inaccessible Boot Disk error makes
it's appearance.

http://aumha.org/a/stop.htm

I've seen similar things in other boot cases on a computer.
A stupid OS will be booting from a DVD, and then all of a
sudden will say "cannot find DVD". And you have to use
a command line "trick" to tell it to use the DVD drive
to read the DVD. You can't make this stuff up, it's
so corny.

Paul

Good Guy
2018-05-03 00:41:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by mike
I bought an Dell Optiplex 755 SFF.
It has a dedicated eSATA port.
Hard drive I want to use is a WD 1600HLFS VelociRaptor.
I plugged in my Rosewill RDDO-13002
external eSATA docking station.
Booted macrium from USB and restored sysprepped
Win7 via eSATA.
It wouldn't boot.
I let it do it's repair diagnostics and it couldn't
fix it.
I plugged the drive directly to the motherboard eSATA
socket and let it boot and do the first boot configuration.
Works good.
Plugged it back into the Rosewill eSATA dock.
It boots as far as the swirling dots, then reboots.
On reboot, I get the repair menu.
I select "boot anyway". (or words to that effect)
It booted and ran.
That's the last time I saw it boot from the external eSATA
dock.
Keeps booting up to the swirling dots and reboots.
I booted another internal drive and did some stress
testing on the drive in the eSATA dock. No issues.
Drive still works fine if I remove the external dock
and plug the drive directly to the dedicated eSATA socket on the
motherboard. Just to be clear, it's a standard SATA socket
that's managed separately in the BIOS as eSATA.
The cable to the rear panel converts to eSATA hardware configuration.
I have zero experience trying to boot from eSATA.
Is this something that Microsoft does to inhibit
our use of the OS?
Ideas?
This is the solution given on DELL's Forum
Post by mike
I run a copy of Windows 7 from an eSATA drive on my laptop. Here's how
1. I removed old drive from laptop
2. Put new drive in laptop
3. Installed Windows 7 on the new drive
4. Put old drive back in laptop and put the new Windows 7 drive back
in its eSATA case
5. Booted up old drive
6. Plugged in eSATA drive, and made note of the drive letter assigned
to the Windows 7 partition on the eSATA drive (use Windows
Explorer to browse for the right drive, then note the drive letter
assigned to it)
7. Installed EasyBCD <http://neosmart.net/EasyBCD> to change the boot
loader (Non Commercial use is free but you need to register; So
create a dummy disposable eMail account for this)
8. Using EasyBCD made a new entry, called it "Win7 eSATA", and told
it to find the new copy of Windows 7 on the eSATA drive at the
drive letter in #6
9. Rebooted
You will find a menu now at bootup, where you can let the internal
Windows 7 boot up by default, or choose "Win eSATA" and boot up from
Windows 7 on the external drive. You do not need to have the eSATA
drive connected unless you intend to use it.
<https://superuser.com/questions/431218/is-possible-to-load-windows-7-from-the-esata-drive-even-if-its-not-supported-i>
Post by mike
/--- This email has been checked for viruses by
Windows Defender software.
//https://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/windows/comprehensive-security/
--
With over 600 million devices now running Windows 10, customer
satisfaction is higher than any previous version of windows.
mike
2018-05-03 04:05:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Good Guy
Post by mike
I bought an Dell Optiplex 755 SFF.
It has a dedicated eSATA port.
Hard drive I want to use is a WD 1600HLFS VelociRaptor.
I plugged in my Rosewill RDDO-13002
external eSATA docking station.
Booted macrium from USB and restored sysprepped
Win7 via eSATA.
It wouldn't boot.
I let it do it's repair diagnostics and it couldn't
fix it.
I plugged the drive directly to the motherboard eSATA
socket and let it boot and do the first boot configuration.
Works good.
Plugged it back into the Rosewill eSATA dock.
It boots as far as the swirling dots, then reboots.
On reboot, I get the repair menu.
I select "boot anyway". (or words to that effect)
It booted and ran.
That's the last time I saw it boot from the external eSATA
dock.
Keeps booting up to the swirling dots and reboots.
I booted another internal drive and did some stress
testing on the drive in the eSATA dock. No issues.
Drive still works fine if I remove the external dock
and plug the drive directly to the dedicated eSATA socket on the
motherboard. Just to be clear, it's a standard SATA socket
that's managed separately in the BIOS as eSATA.
The cable to the rear panel converts to eSATA hardware configuration.
I have zero experience trying to boot from eSATA.
Is this something that Microsoft does to inhibit
our use of the OS?
Ideas?
This is the solution given on DELL's Forum
Post by mike
I run a copy of Windows 7 from an eSATA drive on my laptop. Here's how
1. I removed old drive from laptop
2. Put new drive in laptop
3. Installed Windows 7 on the new drive
4. Put old drive back in laptop and put the new Windows 7 drive back
in its eSATA case
5. Booted up old drive
6. Plugged in eSATA drive, and made note of the drive letter assigned
to the Windows 7 partition on the eSATA drive (use Windows
Explorer to browse for the right drive, then note the drive letter
assigned to it)
7. Installed EasyBCD <http://neosmart.net/EasyBCD> to change the boot
loader (Non Commercial use is free but you need to register; So
create a dummy disposable eMail account for this)
8. Using EasyBCD made a new entry, called it "Win7 eSATA", and told
it to find the new copy of Windows 7 on the eSATA drive at the
drive letter in #6
9. Rebooted
You will find a menu now at bootup, where you can let the internal
Windows 7 boot up by default, or choose "Win eSATA" and boot up from
Windows 7 on the external drive. You do not need to have the eSATA
drive connected unless you intend to use it.
<https://superuser.com/questions/431218/is-possible-to-load-windows-7-from-the-esata-drive-even-if-its-not-supported-i>
That's interesting, but won't help.
That method accesses the internal drive to get the information
required to boot the eSATA drive. I don't have an internal drive.

It does suggest a possible cause.
The BIOS is smart enough to decide which port to boot.
The boot process starts correctly, but win7 gets confused
when accessing the external drive dock and pulls
the rug out from under itself.

The external drive dock does USB2.0 or eSATA.
It's possible that miscommunication between the
boot process and the chip in the eSATA dock
results in changing the mode or disconnecting
the eSATA port from the dock end.

This is a windows 7 only problem. Linux and win10
boot just fine from eSATA and my external dock.
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