Discussion:
how the blinking heck do I have Search just look a _FILEWW_ names?
(too old to reply)
pyotr filipivich
2018-05-02 16:04:14 UTC
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I can't find a file I need, and when I search for "job", windows
includes every freaking file in ever freaking DIRECTORY which has
those three letters in them.
forty eleven Cat pictures - because they are in the directory
Jobby!
something having to do with the flowers because the directory
contains "jobola"

How, or is it even possible, to get Windows to just search for
"job" in filenames.

This is one more thing which Windows 7 does, which I do not recall
Win XP not doing.


tschus
pyotr

Yes, I'm furious, I'm out of time and the presentation is not going to
happen.
--
pyotr filipivich
The question was asked: "Is Hindsight overrated?"
In retrospect, it appears to be.
Rene Lamontagne
2018-05-02 16:08:53 UTC
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Post by pyotr filipivich
I can't find a file I need, and when I search for "job", windows
includes every freaking file in ever freaking DIRECTORY which has
those three letters in them.
forty eleven Cat pictures - because they are in the directory
Jobby!
something having to do with the flowers because the directory
contains "jobola"
How, or is it even possible, to get Windows to just search for
"job" in filenames.
This is one more thing which Windows 7 does, which I do not recall
Win XP not doing.
tschus
pyotr
Yes, I'm furious, I'm out of time and the presentation is not going to
happen.
Install Everything.exe then under search menu tick Whole word, See if
that works.

Rene
JJ
2018-05-02 17:11:02 UTC
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Post by pyotr filipivich
I can't find a file I need, and when I search for "job", windows
includes every freaking file in ever freaking DIRECTORY which has
those three letters in them.
forty eleven Cat pictures - because they are in the directory
Jobby!
something having to do with the flowers because the directory
contains "jobola"
How, or is it even possible, to get Windows to just search for
"job" in filenames.
This is one more thing which Windows 7 does, which I do not recall
Win XP not doing.
tschus
pyotr
Yes, I'm furious, I'm out of time and the presentation is not going to
happen.
Double quote the search term. e.g.:

"job"

Instead of just:

job
Java Jive
2018-05-02 17:12:50 UTC
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Post by pyotr filipivich
I can't find a file I need, and when I search for "job", windows
includes every freaking file in ever freaking DIRECTORY which has
those three letters in them.
Did you actually include the quotes, and if not what happens if you do?
In other words, if you haven't already, try searching for something like
"job.*" (including the quotes), not job (without them).
VanguardLH
2018-05-02 18:01:46 UTC
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Post by pyotr filipivich
I can't find a file I need, and when I search for "job", windows
includes every freaking file in ever freaking DIRECTORY which has
those three letters in them. forty eleven Cat pictures - because they
are in the directory Jobby! something having to do with the flowers
because the directory contains "jobola"
How, or is it even possible, to get Windows to just search for "job"
in filenames.
AQS (Advanced Query Syntax) for Windows Search is pretty rich but takes
a while to learn. In short, to search on only files (aka documents)
with "job" somewhere in their name, use:

job kind:document

You'll notice when type "kind:" that a drop-down list appears of
available values of which "document" is one. I'm assuming you are using
the searchbox in Windows Explorer.

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa965711(v=vs.85).aspx

Else, you could use Search Everything but you'll have to learn regex to
let you exclude certain characters, like the backslash (which must be
escaped by using \\ to differentiate from special characters, like \n
for newline and \S for a non-whitespace char), where to anchor the
string (if anchored rather than as a substring not at the start or end
of the string), etc.

Advanced Query Syntax
https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa965711(v=vs.85).aspx
Post by pyotr filipivich
Yes, I'm furious, I'm out of time and the presentation is not going to
happen.
So you are here to vent instead of getting help? Microsoft doesn't
visit any newsgroups (aka Usenet). You're venting to your peers. You
don't plan ahead to prepare AND PRACTICE for your presentations?
pyotr filipivich
2018-05-02 20:57:11 UTC
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Post by VanguardLH
Post by pyotr filipivich
I can't find a file I need, and when I search for "job", windows
includes every freaking file in ever freaking DIRECTORY which has
those three letters in them. forty eleven Cat pictures - because they
are in the directory Jobby! something having to do with the flowers
because the directory contains "jobola"
How, or is it even possible, to get Windows to just search for "job"
in filenames.
AQS (Advanced Query Syntax) for Windows Search is pretty rich but takes
a while to learn. In short, to search on only files (aka documents)
job kind:document
You'll notice when type "kind:" that a drop-down list appears of
available values of which "document" is one. I'm assuming you are using
the searchbox in Windows Explorer.
Yes.

I just found that
filename:job
does the trick as well.
Post by VanguardLH
https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa965711(v=vs.85).aspx
Else, you could use Search Everything but you'll have to learn regex to
let you exclude certain characters, like the backslash (which must be
escaped by using \\ to differentiate from special characters, like \n
for newline and \S for a non-whitespace char), where to anchor the
string (if anchored rather than as a substring not at the start or end
of the string), etc.
Advanced Query Syntax
https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa965711(v=vs.85).aspx
Post by pyotr filipivich
Yes, I'm furious, I'm out of time and the presentation is not going to
happen.
So you are here to vent instead of getting help?
No
Post by VanguardLH
Microsoft doesn't
visit any newsgroups (aka Usenet). You're venting to your peers. You
don't plan ahead to prepare AND PRACTICE for your presentations?
In this case,the presentation was a simple resume. Yes, I should
have sent it to the printers last week, but then I would have been
searching for these files last week. And Microsoft would still have
been "tagging" everything which has J O B in the title, the directory
name, or inside the file itself.
--
pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
Paul
2018-05-03 01:09:41 UTC
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Post by pyotr filipivich
In this case,the presentation was a simple resume. Yes, I should
have sent it to the printers last week, but then I would have been
searching for these files last week. And Microsoft would still have
been "tagging" everything which has J O B in the title, the directory
name, or inside the file itself.
Agent Ransack

https://www.mythicsoft.com/agentransack/

supports "regex" and to find files beginning with job, you'd use

^job

If I knew the end of the file name, and I escaped the
dot to make it literal, I could do

job\.doc$

which says "look for job.doc right at the very end of the file name".

If Windows Search supports this sort of thing, it's by
approximation and not actual Regex or PCRE. There will be
some Windows Search commands that have an equivalent effect to a
proper search.

One advantage of Agent Ransack, is it's more likely to
look everywhere. It cannot look inside "C:\System Volume Information"
because that is Access Denied for virtually any tool.
Everything.exe can potentially look in there (because
it reads the $MFT directly), except Everything.exe will
run into trouble when attempting to stat() the contents
and get size and date info. It's hard to say whether
Everything.exe could list just the file names of the files
in there, even though you have no way to look at them.

Windows Search does a poor job, because occasionally you
don't realize how some Windows permission or attribute
has blocked your search attempt. Third-party tools are
your friend, in this regard. Even if you choose not
to use the third party ones all that often, you should
keep them installed for "emergency search tasks" such
as this case.

Paul
Stan Brown
2018-05-03 02:36:10 UTC
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Post by pyotr filipivich
How, or is it even possible, to get Windows to just search for
"job" in filenames.
dir /s /b C:\*job*
--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://BrownMath.com/
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
Shikata ga nai...
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-03 08:50:41 UTC
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Post by Stan Brown
Post by pyotr filipivich
How, or is it even possible, to get Windows to just search for
"job" in filenames.
dir /s /b C:\*job*
I think he wanted to search for _just_ job, not *job*. [in which case
\job.* might work in your suggestion.]
3
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

If you're playing a killer monster, be very quiet. -
Anthony Hopkins, RT 2016/10/22-28
Stan Brown
2018-05-03 22:36:00 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Stan Brown
Post by pyotr filipivich
How, or is it even possible, to get Windows to just search for
"job" in filenames.
dir /s /b C:\*job*
I think he wanted to search for _just_ job, not *job*. [in which case
\job.* might work in your suggestion.]
Maybe you're right, but he said "in" filenames.

You and I agree on the main point, though: this is really easy on the
command line.
--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://BrownMath.com/
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
Shikata ga nai...
Char Jackson
2018-05-03 22:59:08 UTC
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On Thu, 3 May 2018 18:36:00 -0400, Stan Brown
Post by Stan Brown
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Stan Brown
Post by pyotr filipivich
How, or is it even possible, to get Windows to just search for
"job" in filenames.
dir /s /b C:\*job*
I think he wanted to search for _just_ job, not *job*. [in which case
\job.* might work in your suggestion.]
Maybe you're right, but he said "in" filenames.
You and I agree on the main point, though: this is really easy on the
command line.
He seems to want to exclude directory (folder) names, so I think an
additional parameter might be required:

dir /s /b /a-d <search_target>
--
Char Jackson
Ron C
2018-05-03 23:59:47 UTC
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Post by Char Jackson
On Thu, 3 May 2018 18:36:00 -0400, Stan Brown
Post by Stan Brown
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Stan Brown
Post by pyotr filipivich
How, or is it even possible, to get Windows to just search for
"job" in filenames.
dir /s /b C:\*job*
I think he wanted to search for _just_ job, not *job*. [in which case
\job.* might work in your suggestion.]
Maybe you're right, but he said "in" filenames.
You and I agree on the main point, though: this is really easy on the
command line.
He seems to want to exclude directory (folder) names, so I think an
dir /s /b /a-d <search_target>
Damn, don't they ever test these search procedures on
the "vast wasteland" of non-computer-geeks?
--
==
Later...
Ron C
--
pyotr filipivich
2018-05-04 14:30:39 UTC
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Post by Ron C
Post by Char Jackson
On Thu, 3 May 2018 18:36:00 -0400, Stan Brown
Post by Stan Brown
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Stan Brown
Post by pyotr filipivich
How, or is it even possible, to get Windows to just search for
"job" in filenames.
dir /s /b C:\*job*
I think he wanted to search for _just_ job, not *job*. [in which case
\job.* might work in your suggestion.]
Maybe you're right, but he said "in" filenames.
You and I agree on the main point, though: this is really easy on the
command line.
He seems to want to exclude directory (folder) names, so I think an
dir /s /b /a-d <search_target>
Damn, don't they ever test these search procedures on
the "vast wasteland" of non-computer-geeks?
Apparently, the answer is "no".

The scary part - the organizational structures these people seem
most comfortable, what does that say about their minds?
--
pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
Char Jackson
2018-05-04 15:57:53 UTC
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On Fri, 04 May 2018 07:30:39 -0700, pyotr filipivich
Post by pyotr filipivich
Post by Ron C
Post by Char Jackson
On Thu, 3 May 2018 18:36:00 -0400, Stan Brown
Post by Stan Brown
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Stan Brown
Post by pyotr filipivich
How, or is it even possible, to get Windows to just search for
"job" in filenames.
dir /s /b C:\*job*
I think he wanted to search for _just_ job, not *job*. [in which case
\job.* might work in your suggestion.]
Maybe you're right, but he said "in" filenames.
You and I agree on the main point, though: this is really easy on the
command line.
He seems to want to exclude directory (folder) names, so I think an
dir /s /b /a-d <search_target>
Damn, don't they ever test these search procedures on
the "vast wasteland" of non-computer-geeks?
Apparently, the answer is "no".
No, the answer is "yes", at least in my case. I tested it extensively
before I posted.
Post by pyotr filipivich
The scary part - the organizational structures these people seem
most comfortable, what does that say about their minds?
Aren't you the guy who had a document that you couldn't find, even
though you knew it was named "job<something>.3le"? That should have been
one of the all-time easiest searches.
--
Char Jackson
pyotr filipivich
2018-05-04 23:05:00 UTC
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Post by Char Jackson
On Fri, 04 May 2018 07:30:39 -0700, pyotr filipivich
Post by pyotr filipivich
Post by Ron C
Post by Char Jackson
On Thu, 3 May 2018 18:36:00 -0400, Stan Brown
Post by Stan Brown
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Stan Brown
Post by pyotr filipivich
How, or is it even possible, to get Windows to just search for
"job" in filenames.
dir /s /b C:\*job*
I think he wanted to search for _just_ job, not *job*. [in which case
\job.* might work in your suggestion.]
Maybe you're right, but he said "in" filenames.
You and I agree on the main point, though: this is really easy on the
command line.
He seems to want to exclude directory (folder) names, so I think an
dir /s /b /a-d <search_target>
Damn, don't they ever test these search procedures on
the "vast wasteland" of non-computer-geeks?
Apparently, the answer is "no".
No, the answer is "yes", at least in my case. I tested it extensively
before I posted.
Yes, you tested it. But did Microsoft? Does Microsoft?
Post by Char Jackson
Post by pyotr filipivich
The scary part - the organizational structures these people seem
most comfortable, what does that say about their minds?
Aren't you the guy who had a document that you couldn't find, even
though you knew it was named "job<something>.3le"? That should have been
one of the all-time easiest searches.
When I got 1049 "hits" on "job" with such relevant files as
"Icebreaker Questions.rft" SD-Log01.wpd, "SERVICE BOOK of the Holy
Orthodox Catholic Apostolic Church - Hapgood - 1906", _cmdprompt.bat,
and 3rd Angle Projection.pdf, plus the ever relevant "6-d.jpg" - let
me just say that the last time I had to wade through that many "hits"
trying to find the relevant ones, I was doing evidence discovery for a
law firm.
--
pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
Char Jackson
2018-05-05 17:34:24 UTC
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On Fri, 04 May 2018 16:05:00 -0700, pyotr filipivich
Post by pyotr filipivich
Post by Char Jackson
On Fri, 04 May 2018 07:30:39 -0700, pyotr filipivich
Post by pyotr filipivich
Post by Ron C
Post by Char Jackson
On Thu, 3 May 2018 18:36:00 -0400, Stan Brown
Post by Stan Brown
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Stan Brown
Post by pyotr filipivich
How, or is it even possible, to get Windows to just search for
"job" in filenames.
dir /s /b C:\*job*
I think he wanted to search for _just_ job, not *job*. [in which case
\job.* might work in your suggestion.]
Maybe you're right, but he said "in" filenames.
You and I agree on the main point, though: this is really easy on the
command line.
He seems to want to exclude directory (folder) names, so I think an
dir /s /b /a-d <search_target>
Damn, don't they ever test these search procedures on
the "vast wasteland" of non-computer-geeks?
Apparently, the answer is "no".
No, the answer is "yes", at least in my case. I tested it extensively
before I posted.
Yes, you tested it. But did Microsoft? Does Microsoft?
Post by Char Jackson
Post by pyotr filipivich
The scary part - the organizational structures these people seem
most comfortable, what does that say about their minds?
Aren't you the guy who had a document that you couldn't find, even
though you knew it was named "job<something>.3le"? That should have been
one of the all-time easiest searches.
When I got 1049 "hits" on "job" with such relevant files as
"Icebreaker Questions.rft" SD-Log01.wpd, "SERVICE BOOK of the Holy
Orthodox Catholic Apostolic Church - Hapgood - 1906", _cmdprompt.bat,
and 3rd Angle Projection.pdf, plus the ever relevant "6-d.jpg" - let
me just say that the last time I had to wade through that many "hits"
trying to find the relevant ones, I was doing evidence discovery for a
law firm.
I don't see "job" in any of those results.

My suggestions, FWIW:
1. Pay attention to where you put things so that you don't have to
search for them later.
2. Pay attention to how you name things so that your searches can be
more effective.
3. You knew what the file extension was, so include that in your search.
4. Learn to use your search tools so that you can avoid another case of
not being able to find something on short notice.
5. Windows search is the worst of your available options, so learn to
use tools such as Everything and Agent Ransack.

Anyway, all's well that ends well, right? You found your document and
you lived another day. Another narrow escape.
--
Char Jackson
Mike S
2018-05-06 06:31:32 UTC
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On 5/5/2018 10:34 AM, Char Jackson wrote:
<snip>
Post by Char Jackson
1. Pay attention to where you put things so that you don't have to
search for them later.
2. Pay attention to how you name things so that your searches can be
more effective.
3. You knew what the file extension was, so include that in your search.
4. Learn to use your search tools so that you can avoid another case of
not being able to find something on short notice.
5. Windows search is the worst of your available options, so learn to
use tools such as Everything and Agent Ransack.
Anyway, all's well that ends well, right? You found your document and
you lived another day. Another narrow escape.
I love Search Everything by voidtools, it's very fast, free, and
full-featured. From the FAQ:

Type the partial file or folder name into the search edit, the results
will appear instantly.

AND is the default boolean operator. For example, to search for abc and
123, search for: abc 123

To search for either of two search terms, add a | between the terms. For
example, to search for .jpg or .bmp, search for: .jpg | .bmp

To exclude something from the search include a ! at the front of the
term. For example, to search for everything except abc, search for: !abc

To show the basic search syntax in Everything: In "Everything", from the
Help menu, click Search syntax.

Using a * in your search will match any number of any type of character.
For example, here is how to search for files and folders that start with
e and end with g: e*g

Using a ? in your search will match one character. For example, here is
how to search for files that have a 2 letter file extension: *.??

To include spaces in your search enclose your search in double quotes.
For example, here is how to search for foo<space>bar: "foo bar"

To search for a file type, type the file extension into the search edit,
eg: to search for the mp3 file type, type *.mp3 into the search edit.

To search for more than one type of file type use a | to separate file
types, eg: *.bmp|*.jpg will search for files with the extension bmp or jpg.

To search for files and folders in a specific location include a \ in
your search string. For example, here is how to search for all your mp3s
in a downloads folder: downloads\ .mp3

You could alternately enable Match Path in the Search menu and include
the location in your search string.

For example, here is how to search for all your avis in a downloads
folder with Match Path enabled: downloads .avi

(also has advanced searching)

https://www.voidtools.com/faq/
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-05-06 06:54:49 UTC
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In message <pcm7g8$pnp$***@dont-email.me>, Mike S <***@yahoo.com>
writes:
[]
I love Search Everything by voidtools, it's very fast, free, and full-
Me too.
Type the partial file or folder name into the search edit, the results
will appear instantly.
AND is the default boolean operator. For example, to search for abc and
123, search for: abc 123
To search for either of two search terms, add a | between the terms.
For example, to search for .jpg or .bmp, search for: .jpg | .bmp
(I didn't know about that one.)
To exclude something from the search include a ! at the front of the
term. For example, to search for everything except abc, search for: !abc
(Or that one. Though what happens if you want to search for a filename
that starts with !, which can occur, and in fact I often use it to make
those files appear at the top?)
To show the basic search syntax in Everything: In "Everything", from
the Help menu, click Search syntax.
Using a * in your search will match any number of any type of
Including zero
character. For example, here is how to search for files and folders
that start with e and end with g: e*g
(So including eg itself, Actually, I think e*g will include f&f that
contain an e followed by a g _anywhere_ in the name, not just start with
e and end with g - e. g. "legs". But I'm not _sure_ about that.)
Using a ? in your search will match one character. For example, here is
how to search for files that have a 2 letter file extension: *.??
To include spaces in your search enclose your search in double quotes.
For example, here is how to search for foo<space>bar: "foo bar"
To search for a file type, type the file extension into the search
edit, eg: to search for the mp3 file type, type *.mp3 into the search
edit.
I think the * is not needed - .mp3 will work. (Their example above
explaining the | [OR] operator implies it will!)
To search for more than one type of file type use a | to separate file
types, eg: *.bmp|*.jpg will search for files with the extension bmp or jpg.
Again (and as above!).
To search for files and folders in a specific location include a \ in
your search string. For example, here is how to search for all your
mp3s in a downloads folder: downloads\ .mp3
You could alternately enable Match Path in the Search menu and include
the location in your search string.
So including "\" is the same as "match path". Interesting.
For example, here is how to search for all your avis in a downloads
folder with Match Path enabled: downloads .avi
(also has advanced searching)
https://www.voidtools.com/faq/
Thanks for that.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Experience is that marvelous thing that enables you to recognize a mistake when
you make it again. -Franklin P. Jones
pyotr filipivich
2018-05-08 21:24:59 UTC
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Post by Char Jackson
Post by pyotr filipivich
When I got 1049 "hits" on "job" with such relevant files as
"Icebreaker Questions.rft" SD-Log01.wpd, "SERVICE BOOK of the Holy
Orthodox Catholic Apostolic Church - Hapgood - 1906", _cmdprompt.bat,
and 3rd Angle Projection.pdf, plus the ever relevant "6-d.jpg" - let
me just say that the last time I had to wade through that many "hits"
trying to find the relevant ones, I was doing evidence discovery for a
law firm.
I don't see "job" in any of those results.
1. Pay attention to where you put things so that you don't have to
search for them later.
I did. I've got everything organized by 'category.
Post by Char Jackson
2. Pay attention to how you name things so that your searches can be
more effective.
I knew it was called "Job_Hist"
Post by Char Jackson
3. You knew what the file extension was, so include that in your search.
Good point. I'll try that.
Post by Char Jackson
4. Learn to use your search tools so that you can avoid another case of
not being able to find something on short notice.
That is a good idea. Unfortunately, "Windows Help" is the
anti-program.
Post by Char Jackson
5. Windows search is the worst of your available options, so learn to
use tools such as Everything and Agent Ransack.
Unfortunately, that means I have to go install Yet Another
Program. Fnord, I've already installed many programs so I don't have
to use MS products.
Post by Char Jackson
Anyway, all's well that ends well, right? You found your document and
you lived another day. Another narrow escape.
Narrow, yes, that's one way of putting it.
--
pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
Stan Brown
2018-05-05 14:07:59 UTC
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Post by Char Jackson
On Thu, 3 May 2018 18:36:00 -0400, Stan Brown
Post by Stan Brown
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Stan Brown
Post by pyotr filipivich
How, or is it even possible, to get Windows to just search for
"job" in filenames.
dir /s /b C:\*job*
I think he wanted to search for _just_ job, not *job*. [in which case
\job.* might work in your suggestion.]
Maybe you're right, but he said "in" filenames.
You and I agree on the main point, though: this is really easy on the
command line.
He seems to want to exclude directory (folder) names, so I think an
dir /s /b /a-d <search_target>
Good catch -- thanks!
--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://BrownMath.com/
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
Shikata ga nai...
pyotr filipivich
2018-05-03 23:44:18 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by Stan Brown
Post by pyotr filipivich
How, or is it even possible, to get Windows to just search for
"job" in filenames.
dir /s /b C:\*job*
I think he wanted to search for _just_ job, not *job*. [in which case
\job.* might work in your suggestion.]
I'm sure it was job{something}.3le.
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pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
pyotr filipivich
2018-05-03 23:44:18 UTC
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Post by Stan Brown
Post by pyotr filipivich
How, or is it even possible, to get Windows to just search for
"job" in filenames.
dir /s /b C:\*job*
That's DOS, i.e. the command line. (I have many copies of
_cmdprmt.bat scattered all round the place. For just hat reason.)

Windows is not DOS.
--
pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
VanguardLH
2018-05-04 01:11:44 UTC
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Post by pyotr filipivich
Post by Stan Brown
Post by pyotr filipivich
How, or is it even possible, to get Windows to just search for "job"
in filenames.
dir /s /b C:\*job*
That's DOS, i.e. the command line. (I have many copies of
_cmdprmt.bat scattered all round the place. For just hat reason.)
Windows is not DOS.
'dir' is an internal DOS-mode command (i.e., internal to the command
shell program). You run those in a command shell whether it was back in
MS/IBM-DOS days or nowadays inside of Windows (which also has a command
shell via cmd.exe). You NEVER ran a machine-coded 'dir' program. It is
an internal command defined within the command shell.

You do know how to load a command shell in Windows, right? Just run
cmd.exe to load a command shell. Then you can run its internal
functions, like 'dir', or have it load other programs.

Actually, Windows is a DOS. DOS = Disk Operating System. Yep, Windows
loads from a disk whether an HDD, SDD, flash drive, or whatever. A
change in kernel does not obviate an OS is still a DOS. It is a pity
that Gates chose "DOS" for his operating system name, like calling "dog"
your pet dog. Maybe he should've stayed with Seattle DOS which he
purchased as quick step up to get into producing an OS, and dropped off
the "DOS" which was redundant, like saying you have a leek onion.

However, what you want is the command *shell* which either calls it
internal functions (those within cmd.exe) or a loader of external
programs. When you were using MS/IBM-DOS, you were using command.com as
the command shell with its command-line parser and interpreter.
Nowadays in Windows, yep, you can still use a command shell (cmd.exe).
Just because Microsoft changed the shortcut to "Command Prompt" does not
alter that the shortcut is loading a command shell. You can use command
shells from other sources, too.
pyotr filipivich
2018-05-04 14:30:39 UTC
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Post by VanguardLH
Post by pyotr filipivich
Post by Stan Brown
Post by pyotr filipivich
How, or is it even possible, to get Windows to just search for "job"
in filenames.
dir /s /b C:\*job*
That's DOS, i.e. the command line. (I have many copies of
_cmdprmt.bat scattered all round the place. For just hat reason.)
Windows is not DOS.
'dir' is an internal DOS-mode command (i.e., internal to the command
shell program). You run those in a command shell whether it was back in
MS/IBM-DOS days or nowadays inside of Windows (which also has a command
shell via cmd.exe). You NEVER ran a machine-coded 'dir' program. It is
an internal command defined within the command shell.
And that is too far into the weeds for my current use. (Last
time I coded for the machine level was a Minex Class. Not fun.)
--
pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
Char Jackson
2018-05-04 15:49:37 UTC
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On Fri, 04 May 2018 07:30:39 -0700, pyotr filipivich
Post by pyotr filipivich
Post by VanguardLH
Post by pyotr filipivich
Post by Stan Brown
Post by pyotr filipivich
How, or is it even possible, to get Windows to just search for "job"
in filenames.
dir /s /b C:\*job*
That's DOS, i.e. the command line. (I have many copies of
_cmdprmt.bat scattered all round the place. For just hat reason.)
Windows is not DOS.
'dir' is an internal DOS-mode command (i.e., internal to the command
shell program). You run those in a command shell whether it was back in
MS/IBM-DOS days or nowadays inside of Windows (which also has a command
shell via cmd.exe). You NEVER ran a machine-coded 'dir' program. It is
an internal command defined within the command shell.
And that is too far into the weeds for my current use. (Last
time I coded for the machine level was a Minex Class. Not fun.)
Coded for the machine level?? Are you still referring to running the dir
command at a command prompt? Is that what you're calling coding for the
machine level? LOL
--
Char Jackson
pyotr filipivich
2018-05-04 23:08:24 UTC
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Post by Char Jackson
On Fri, 04 May 2018 07:30:39 -0700, pyotr filipivich
Post by pyotr filipivich
Post by VanguardLH
Post by pyotr filipivich
Post by Stan Brown
Post by pyotr filipivich
How, or is it even possible, to get Windows to just search for "job"
in filenames.
dir /s /b C:\*job*
That's DOS, i.e. the command line. (I have many copies of
_cmdprmt.bat scattered all round the place. For just hat reason.)
Windows is not DOS.
'dir' is an internal DOS-mode command (i.e., internal to the command
shell program). You run those in a command shell whether it was back in
MS/IBM-DOS days or nowadays inside of Windows (which also has a command
shell via cmd.exe). You NEVER ran a machine-coded 'dir' program. It is
an internal command defined within the command shell.
And that is too far into the weeds for my current use. (Last
time I coded for the machine level was a Minex Class. Not fun.)
Coded for the machine level?? Are you still referring to running the dir
command at a command prompt? Is that what you're calling coding for the
machine level? LOL
No, but do try to keep up.
--
pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
Stan Brown
2018-05-05 14:09:10 UTC
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Post by pyotr filipivich
That's DOS, i.e. the command line.
You're more than a decade out of date. The command line hasn't been
DOS for a long, long time.
--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://BrownMath.com/
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
Shikata ga nai...
Paul
2018-05-05 16:55:36 UTC
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Post by Stan Brown
Post by pyotr filipivich
That's DOS, i.e. the command line.
You're more than a decade out of date. The command line hasn't been
DOS for a long, long time.
The running process might say "NTVDM".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_DOS_machine

One difference between the Command Prompt and a "real DOS boot-up",
is real DOS gives you access to hardware, whereas Command Prompt
is insulated. You can't flash the BIOS the normal way from
Command Prompt, whereas putting the flasher EXE and flash ROM file
on a boot floppy, works. That's part of the difference
between the two environments.

Command Prompt emulates the traditional commands just fine,
and allows you to do a few things. Some softwares, the
usage notes will tell you of the difference, and how the
software won't work right without "real DOS".

Paul
pyotr filipivich
2018-05-08 21:24:59 UTC
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Post by Paul
Post by Stan Brown
Post by pyotr filipivich
That's DOS, i.e. the command line.
You're more than a decade out of date. The command line hasn't been
DOS for a long, long time.
The running process might say "NTVDM".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_DOS_machine
One difference between the Command Prompt and a "real DOS boot-up",
is real DOS gives you access to hardware, whereas Command Prompt
is insulated. You can't flash the BIOS the normal way from
Command Prompt, whereas putting the flasher EXE and flash ROM file
on a boot floppy, works. That's part of the difference
between the two environments.
There was a time when I could boot from monitor. "Because I
could." {Saved my house mate a load of issues when I answered the
call for tech support and told them how to do that. Yeah, back before
cellphoens, blah, blah. "Back in my day, we only had six bits - not
even a full byte!")
Post by Paul
Command Prompt emulates the traditional commands just fine,
and allows you to do a few things. Some softwares, the
usage notes will tell you of the difference, and how the
software won't work right without "real DOS".
Paul
--
pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
pyotr filipivich
2018-05-08 21:24:59 UTC
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Post by Stan Brown
Post by pyotr filipivich
That's DOS, i.e. the command line.
You're more than a decade out of date.
Not surprising, I stopped being computer geek way back in the last
century. Like photography, when I stopped having access to a
darkroom, I stopped developing my own film and printing my pictures.
Might as well switch to color - which I did.
Post by Stan Brown
The command line hasn't been DOS for a long, long time.
Whatever that is called when I run "CMD" - it looks & acts like Ye
Olde Command Lynn.
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pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
pyotr filipivich
2018-05-09 21:57:14 UTC
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Post by pyotr filipivich
I can't find a file I need, and when I search for "job", windows
includes every freaking file in ever freaking DIRECTORY which has
those three letters in them.
forty eleven Cat pictures - because they are in the directory
Jobby!
something having to do with the flowers because the directory
contains "jobola"
How, or is it even possible, to get Windows to just search for
"job" in filenames.
This is one more thing which Windows 7 does, which I do not recall
Win XP not doing.
tschus
pyotr
Yes, I'm furious, I'm out of time and the presentation is not going to
happen.
Thanks to all for all the alternate program recommendations.

I did find that by entering "filename:job" I can get just the
files with job in the name, without the directories, or files with
"job" inside them.

I sometimes still wonder what these people are "thinking" when
they set up these search default results. N.B. "sometimes". Sometimes
I don't think much about anything.

tschus
pyotr
--
pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
VanguardLH
2018-05-10 01:58:20 UTC
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I did find that by entering "filename:job" I can get just the files
with job in the name, without the directories, or files with "job"
inside them.
I sometimes still wonder what these people are "thinking" when they
set up these search default results. N.B. "sometimes". Sometimes I
don't think much about anything.
Wait until you get into regex and SQL queries.
pyotr filipivich
2018-05-10 17:00:14 UTC
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Post by VanguardLH
I did find that by entering "filename:job" I can get just the files
with job in the name, without the directories, or files with "job"
inside them.
I sometimes still wonder what these people are "thinking" when they
set up these search default results. N.B. "sometimes". Sometimes I
don't think much about anything.
Wait until you get into regex and SQL queries.
regex - odd, but not a problem

SQL - now that's just weird.
--
pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
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