Discussion:
What are the downsides of a solid state drive in comparison to a traditional hard drive?
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T
2017-06-11 23:53:15 UTC
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From Quora,
Franklin Veaux, Technology enthusiast, mad engineer, and tech startup
founder.
Money. SSDs are way, way more expensive than spinning rust. You can
get a 2 terabyte spinning rust drive at Costco for $39. A 2 terabyte
SSD is hundreds of dollars.
Longevity. An SSD wears out. Every time you record information to it,
you damage the memory cells. This problem is getting worse, not
better. MLC drives wear out faster than SLC drives. The newest TLC
drives wear out even faster. Drive manufacturers do all sorts of
under-the-hood trickery, like moving information around on the drive,
to help ensure all the cells wear evenly.
Data recovery. As a result of this wear leveling, the operating system
doesn't necessarily “know” where the information is stored on the
drive; the drive controller and the drive itself keep track of that as
they move files around to help make the drive wear evenly. If you're
in a situation where your disk directory is corrupted or you overwrite
the partition map or something, data recovery programs may not work.
It is much easier to recover information from a spinning rust drive
than an SSD.
Information retention. If you save files on a spinning rust drive and
on an SSD, stick them both on a shelf, and walk away, the information
on the SSD will slowly evaporate as the charge leaks out of the
floating gate transistors. Come back in five years and your spinning
rust drive will likely be fine. Your SSD, on the other hand, may have
incurred significant data loss, and there's a chance everything on it
will be corrupted. Again, this problem is worse for newer drives.
Hi Morningstar,

I am cc'ing the w7 group, as the info applies to them too.
Note is cross posting police: Bite Me!

Indeed a nice analysis.

SSD cons: they break, especially the cheap ones,
completely dead and non-recoverable.

SSD pros: additively FAST


If you want to use an SSD, here are some of my guidelines:

First, do not use SSD's if you are infected with CABDs.
CABDs, also know as Cheap Assed Buzzard Disease (the "B"
might not stand for "Buzzard"), will affect your outcome
in a disastrous manner. And you know who your are!


If you don't care about your data, find one on sale.
There are times when your just don't care about things,
like cache.


If you care, a good quality SSD will greatly outlive
a mechanical drive.

As for "good quality", avoid Intel drives.

From extensive research, I have found Samsung to be
the best ones as far as I can tell. The ones
I have used (not a lot so far) have been boiler plate.
Their clone utility is so easy to use it is BORING.
Their tech support is America based and is unbelievably
good.

Next, analyze your usage.

For low usage, get a commercial drives: 850 EVO etc..

For intense usage or if you just want a long lived drive,
get an enterprise drive: SM863a for lots of writes; PM863a
for lots of reads.

my 2 cents,
-T
Stan Brown
2017-06-13 02:08:53 UTC
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Post by T
I am cc'ing the w7 group, as the info applies to them too.
Note is cross posting police: Bite Me!
"So let it be written, so let it be done."
--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://BrownMath.com/
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
Shikata ga nai...
Linea Recta
2017-06-13 15:55:21 UTC
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Are there still new laptops available WITHOUT SSD?
I expect to need one shortly.
--
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\../
\/os
Paul
2017-06-13 16:29:30 UTC
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Post by Linea Recta
Are there still new laptops available WITHOUT SSD?
I expect to need one shortly.
Spec a large enough drive and it'll be HDD.

Also, considering there is (supposed) to be a Flash
shortage right now, the manufacturer should temporarily
go back to pushing HDD.

Also, form factor matters.

The thinnest devices get eMMC (flash soldered to motherboard).

Ultra devices might get M.2 (plugin to motherboard socket).

SSD on SATA port is further down the list.

HDD on SATA port is at the bottom (sweet spot for sales volume).

Paul
T
2017-06-13 23:32:10 UTC
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Post by Paul
Also, considering there is (supposed) to be a Flash
shortage right now, the manufacturer should temporarily
go back to pushing HDD.
Hi Paul,

Now that I am Samsung certified (I do believe you had something
to do with that -- thank you!), I can see inventories
for Samsung at my suppliers.

Where as Intel's junk is in very, very short supply, all my
distributors have lots of stock on Samsung. But, they are
a good 20% more expensive. You pay for what you get.

-T
T
2017-06-13 23:29:29 UTC
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Post by Linea Recta
Are there still new laptops available WITHOUT SSD?
I expect to need one shortly.
You pay for what you get. Cheap will get
you a mechanical drive.

Also, not as cheap will be a SATA SSD drive
or an "economy" NVMe SSD drive. Both are about
the same speed.

A good (Samsung) NVMe SSD drive will be about 4 times
faster than a SATA SSD.

And I would recommend Lenovo's T (professional) series.
http://www3.lenovo.com/us/en/laptops/thinkpad/c/thinkpad

They come with American tech support.

You can get them custom with Windows 7 still, if that
is your need.

And be careful, they don't come with DVD drives anymore.
Lucifer Morningstar
2017-06-14 01:17:47 UTC
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On Tue, 13 Jun 2017 17:55:21 +0200, "Linea Recta"
Post by Linea Recta
Are there still new laptops available WITHOUT SSD?
I expect to need one shortly.
Most new laptops use spinning disks.
Linea Recta
2017-06-14 11:25:25 UTC
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Post by Lucifer Morningstar
On Tue, 13 Jun 2017 17:55:21 +0200, "Linea Recta"
Post by Linea Recta
Are there still new laptops available WITHOUT SSD?
I expect to need one shortly.
Most new laptops use spinning disks.
Surprised. Most do have SSD in the advertising folders I receive here.
For me lifespan of the device and pricing ofcourse are more important than
speed.
--
|\ /|
| \/ |@rk
\../
\/os
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