Discussion:
Install new copy of 7 over "Not genuine.." copy?
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(PeteCresswell)
2017-07-29 14:33:44 UTC
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I finally bit the bullet and bought another copy of 7 - presumably a
legit copy since it was from NewEgg.

Am I going to be able to simply "Install" this on to the problem PC
without issues?
--
Pete Cresswell
Jack Fate
2017-07-29 14:36:54 UTC
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Post by (PeteCresswell)
I finally bit the bullet and bought another copy of 7 - presumably a
legit copy since it was from NewEgg.
Am I going to be able to simply "Install" this on to the problem PC
without issues?
Probably.
Big Al
2017-07-29 14:56:28 UTC
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Post by (PeteCresswell)
I finally bit the bullet and bought another copy of 7 - presumably a
legit copy since it was from NewEgg.
Am I going to be able to simply "Install" this on to the problem PC
without issues?
If it has a license key then why not?

Are you going to format the partition before?
(PeteCresswell)
2017-07-29 16:43:28 UTC
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Post by Big Al
Are you going to format the partition before?
Wasn't planning to - but I keep all my data on another partition and can
always recover from a Macrium Reflect image if/when it turns out I was
only wishing I kept all my data on another partition.

Is where a reason to format?
--
Pete Cresswell
Paul
2017-07-29 16:13:57 UTC
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Post by (PeteCresswell)
I finally bit the bullet and bought another copy of 7 - presumably a
legit copy since it was from NewEgg.
Am I going to be able to simply "Install" this on to the problem PC
without issues?
The Win7 installer should be one of the ones that doesn't
need the license key entered, to do the install. That means
you can attempt an installation, at "no cost" in terms of
the new license key. (You enter the license key when you're
convinced the installation process, gave you a working result.)

OS License key
--- -----------
WinXP SP2 Must enter a valid one
WinXP SP3 Can leave key entry blank, 30 days grace, license/activate later
Vista Can leave key entry blank, 30 days grace, license/activate later
Win7 Can leave key entry blank, 30 days grace, license/activate later
Win8 Microsoft-issued install-only keys available, to bypass key entry
Win10 Varies. Right now, "Can leave key entry blank..." seems to work.
Some early versions were "Must enter a valid one",
which is why it gets confusing.

Win7 can be installed at least two ways:

1) Boot the install DVD. Do a "Clean install" blowing
away original content. Unlike WinXP, there's no "Repair"
from the booted DVD.

2) From a running OS of suitable nature, insert the DVD and
execute "Setup.exe" off the Win7 installer DVD. This will
start a "Repair Install", preserving the previous set of
installed programs, maybe keeping the home directory and so
on. You would want to match the characteristics when doing
so (and your purchased disc is Win7 Pro SP1 x64 just like
the non-genuine Win7 Pro SP1 x64 already on the hard drive).

Doing (2) is only a problem, if the "Not Genuine" determination
blocks the desktop from appearing.

WinXP was better, in that a "Repair Install" could be done
by booting the install CD. Win7 is one of the OSes where
you need a "healthy" running OS to execute the Setup.exe
off the installer DVD. Which isn't nearly as generous
or sensible when a "Repair" is needed. Most times the OS
will be busted, just when the user could use a "Repair".

*******

You should be able to do (2) without entering a license key.
If the outcome was bad, no harm done.

However, it remains to be seen whether you can get to
the desktop or not. With a "Not Genuine", you could end
up in a loop at startup. I've had OSes in VMs that kept
looping back to the start again, because they had
exceeded the grace period. An Enterprise install is
a bit more forgiving.

And I don't know if there is a way to bodge-in the new
license key you got, into the current install on the C: drive.
(To make it "genuine" again long enough, to finish a
Repair Install.)

Paul
(PeteCresswell)
2017-07-29 16:46:34 UTC
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Post by Paul
2) From a running OS of suitable nature, insert the DVD and
execute "Setup.exe" off the Win7 installer DVD. This will
start a "Repair Install",
That one sounds like the no-brainer to me.

Push-comes-to-shove, I can always re-image from backup and try other
approaches.

Formatting the drive is not out of the question, but there are man-hours
involved there in re-installing all the stuff I have installed.
--
Pete Cresswell
Ken Blake
2017-07-29 17:07:40 UTC
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Post by (PeteCresswell)
Post by Paul
2) From a running OS of suitable nature, insert the DVD and
execute "Setup.exe" off the Win7 installer DVD. This will
start a "Repair Install",
That one sounds like the no-brainer to me.
Push-comes-to-shove, I can always re-image from backup and try other
approaches.
Formatting the drive is not out of the question, but there are man-hours
involved there in re-installing all the stuff I have installed.
Not just reinstalling, but for most people also reconfiguring them the
way you like them. And for some people, finding all the activation
codes you need for installation.
pjp
2017-07-29 18:02:24 UTC
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Post by Paul
Post by (PeteCresswell)
I finally bit the bullet and bought another copy of 7 - presumably a
legit copy since it was from NewEgg.
Am I going to be able to simply "Install" this on to the problem PC
without issues?
The Win7 installer should be one of the ones that doesn't
need the license key entered, to do the install. That means
you can attempt an installation, at "no cost" in terms of
the new license key. (You enter the license key when you're
convinced the installation process, gave you a working result.)
OS License key
--- -----------
WinXP SP2 Must enter a valid one
WinXP SP3 Can leave key entry blank, 30 days grace, license/activate later
Vista Can leave key entry blank, 30 days grace, license/activate later
Win7 Can leave key entry blank, 30 days grace, license/activate later
Win8 Microsoft-issued install-only keys available, to bypass key entry
Win10 Varies. Right now, "Can leave key entry blank..." seems to work.
Some early versions were "Must enter a valid one",
which is why it gets confusing.
1) Boot the install DVD. Do a "Clean install" blowing
away original content. Unlike WinXP, there's no "Repair"
from the booted DVD.
2) From a running OS of suitable nature, insert the DVD and
execute "Setup.exe" off the Win7 installer DVD. This will
start a "Repair Install", preserving the previous set of
installed programs, maybe keeping the home directory and so
on. You would want to match the characteristics when doing
so (and your purchased disc is Win7 Pro SP1 x64 just like
the non-genuine Win7 Pro SP1 x64 already on the hard drive).
Doing (2) is only a problem, if the "Not Genuine" determination
blocks the desktop from appearing.
WinXP was better, in that a "Repair Install" could be done
by booting the install CD. Win7 is one of the OSes where
you need a "healthy" running OS to execute the Setup.exe
off the installer DVD. Which isn't nearly as generous
or sensible when a "Repair" is needed. Most times the OS
will be busted, just when the user could use a "Repair".
*******
Can't he just change the key from the "non genuine" whatever to what he
bought and forget about even installing anything? Can't see why he'd not
do this unless actual OS has issues or there's reason to believe
something isn't right about it and all he's complained about is the "non
genuine" bs which changing the key to a valid key and then validating
would cure ... I assume :)
Paul
2017-07-29 18:39:44 UTC
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Post by pjp
Post by Paul
Post by (PeteCresswell)
I finally bit the bullet and bought another copy of 7 - presumably a
legit copy since it was from NewEgg.
Am I going to be able to simply "Install" this on to the problem PC
without issues?
The Win7 installer should be one of the ones that doesn't
need the license key entered, to do the install. That means
you can attempt an installation, at "no cost" in terms of
the new license key. (You enter the license key when you're
convinced the installation process, gave you a working result.)
OS License key
--- -----------
WinXP SP2 Must enter a valid one
WinXP SP3 Can leave key entry blank, 30 days grace, license/activate later
Vista Can leave key entry blank, 30 days grace, license/activate later
Win7 Can leave key entry blank, 30 days grace, license/activate later
Win8 Microsoft-issued install-only keys available, to bypass key entry
Win10 Varies. Right now, "Can leave key entry blank..." seems to work.
Some early versions were "Must enter a valid one",
which is why it gets confusing.
1) Boot the install DVD. Do a "Clean install" blowing
away original content. Unlike WinXP, there's no "Repair"
from the booted DVD.
2) From a running OS of suitable nature, insert the DVD and
execute "Setup.exe" off the Win7 installer DVD. This will
start a "Repair Install", preserving the previous set of
installed programs, maybe keeping the home directory and so
on. You would want to match the characteristics when doing
so (and your purchased disc is Win7 Pro SP1 x64 just like
the non-genuine Win7 Pro SP1 x64 already on the hard drive).
Doing (2) is only a problem, if the "Not Genuine" determination
blocks the desktop from appearing.
WinXP was better, in that a "Repair Install" could be done
by booting the install CD. Win7 is one of the OSes where
you need a "healthy" running OS to execute the Setup.exe
off the installer DVD. Which isn't nearly as generous
or sensible when a "Repair" is needed. Most times the OS
will be busted, just when the user could use a "Repair".
*******
Can't he just change the key from the "non genuine" whatever to what he
bought and forget about even installing anything? Can't see why he'd not
do this unless actual OS has issues or there's reason to believe
something isn't right about it and all he's complained about is the "non
genuine" bs which changing the key to a valid key and then validating
would cure ... I assume :)
Yes.

But, he said he wanted to repair install, so I described
the details.

There's probably nothing dodgy about his current install,
that just using a new key wouldn't fix. But I don't know
that "absolutely and for sure". I'm guessing nothing will
go wrong.

There are some SLMGR examples here. These assume (like everything
stated to this point), that you are being allowed to do stuff with
the OS. If it's in one of those loops where it won't let you in,
then you're going to need a different approach. Can you do these
offline ? I've not tried it. I'm not sure this program has
the right command line parameters for offline work. (Note
that slmgr may be available as a .exe or .vbs, depending on
OS version. I personally find that confusing.)

https://www.howtogeek.com/245445/how-to-use-slmgr-to-change-remove-or-extend-your-windows-license/

slmgr.vbs /ipk #####-#####-#####-#####-#####

slmgr.vbs /ato

slmgr.vbs /dlv

Notes:

IPK = key change
ATO = activate
DLV = review license details

Make sure you have your safety backup before proceeding,
so you have options depending on symptoms.

I think I've used the above sequence only once, when
installing my nice $39.95 copy of Win8.1 on the test
machine. I did an install-only key type install, then
followed up a day later with the real purchased key.
And used slmgr to do the job.

HTH,
Paul
(PeteCresswell)
2017-07-29 20:29:58 UTC
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Post by Paul
But, he said he wanted to repair install, so I described
the details.
There's probably nothing dodgy about his current install,
that just using a new key wouldn't fix. But I don't know
that "absolutely and for sure". I'm guessing nothing will
go wrong.
OK... I have to change my assertion about the Repair being the
no-brainer.

First thing, I try registering with the new key.

From what I have heard from various sources, my current install is not
the problem. The problem is that MS's database thinks that my current
install is associated with more than one PC.

So maybe if I just register using the new code, MS will create an entry
in their DB with some sort of hash total to identify my machine and
associate the new code with it and all will be well.

Seems worth a try....
--
Pete Cresswell
Good Guy
2017-07-29 20:44:07 UTC
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Post by (PeteCresswell)
First thing, I try registering with the new key.
Well then get on with it and stop meditating in-front of your machine.
Things don't get resolved by simply discussing the problem. You need to
do something about those problems. How long does it take to insert a
new key? It certainly doesn't take hours let alone take days as in your
case.
--
With over 500 million devices now running Windows 10, customer
satisfaction is higher than any previous version of windows.
Mike Tomlinson
2017-07-30 03:30:53 UTC
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Post by Paul
And I don't know if there is a way to bodge-in the new
license key you got, into the current install on the C: drive
No bodging (or reinstall) required.

Press Winkey-Break.

Find "Windows Activation" at bottom of window.

Click "Change product key".

Enter key from new package bought from NewEgg.

Windows now activates.

Done.
--
(\_/)
(='.'=) "Between two evils, I always pick
(")_(") the one I never tried before." - Mae West
Good Guy
2017-07-29 16:17:53 UTC
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Post by (PeteCresswell)
I finally bit the bullet and bought another copy of 7 - presumably a
legit copy since it was from NewEgg.
Am I going to be able to simply "Install" this on to the problem PC
without issues?
Normally all you need is a valid serial number to activate your dodgy
machine. However, to be on the safe side, you might want to wipe the
disk clean and start everything again. You never know what else is
hidden on the machine by Microsoft servers to keep an eye on your
machine for any other dodgy software packages. It is like "When I know
somebody was stealing from me then I make sure I keep an eye on that
individual just in case he steals again"

Just wipe the disk clean and start again old boy and don't make the same
mistake ever again. Always come here and ask us before doing
anything!!!!!!!!.
--
With over 500 million devices now running Windows 10, customer
satisfaction is higher than any previous version of windows.
VanguardLH
2017-07-29 17:08:39 UTC
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Post by (PeteCresswell)
I finally bit the bullet and bought another copy of 7 - presumably a
legit copy since it was from NewEgg.
Am I going to be able to simply "Install" this on to the problem PC
without issues?
You don't need to install the new legit OS. All you have to do is
reenter the product key for the legit license.

https://miteshshah.github.io/windows/how-to-change-windows-7-product-key/
(or right-click on the Computer desktop icon to get at Properties)
Paul in Houston TX
2017-07-29 17:45:55 UTC
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Post by (PeteCresswell)
I finally bit the bullet and bought another copy of 7 - presumably a
legit copy since it was from NewEgg.
Am I going to be able to simply "Install" this on to the problem PC
without issues?
I agree with Vanguard.
Just type in the new key numbers.
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