Discussion:
My camera card is suddenly write protected; can't turn that off
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slate_leeper
2018-03-12 16:35:30 UTC
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The memory card from my Canon camera, when inserted into the computer,
is now permanently write protected. This means that I can not delete
picture files, as I have been doing for years.

How can I undo this? "Properties" shows no "security" tab at all for
setting permissions.

-dan z-
--
Someone who thinks logically provides
a nice contrast to the real world.
(Anonymous)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-03-12 16:43:46 UTC
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Post by slate_leeper
The memory card from my Canon camera, when inserted into the computer,
is now permanently write protected. This means that I can not delete
picture files, as I have been doing for years.
How can I undo this? "Properties" shows no "security" tab at all for
setting permissions.
-dan z-
You haven't knocked the tab on the side of the card have you? Some types
of card have a mechanical switch.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

... the greatest musical festival in the world that doesn't involve mud.
- Eddie Mair, RT 2014/8/16-22
slate_leeper
2018-03-13 12:44:38 UTC
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On Mon, 12 Mar 2018 16:43:46 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by slate_leeper
The memory card from my Canon camera, when inserted into the computer,
is now permanently write protected. This means that I can not delete
picture files, as I have been doing for years.
How can I undo this? "Properties" shows no "security" tab at all for
setting permissions.
-dan z-
You haven't knocked the tab on the side of the card have you? Some types
of card have a mechanical switch.
Bingo. I didn't even know that was there. It was in the right position
but pushed just slightly off. Live and learn....

Thanks,
-dan z-
--
Someone who thinks logically provides
a nice contrast to the real world.
(Anonymous)
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-03-13 16:19:21 UTC
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Post by slate_leeper
On Mon, 12 Mar 2018 16:43:46 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by slate_leeper
The memory card from my Canon camera, when inserted into the computer,
is now permanently write protected. This means that I can not delete
[]
Post by slate_leeper
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
You haven't knocked the tab on the side of the card have you? Some types
of card have a mechanical switch.
[]
Post by slate_leeper
Bingo. I didn't even know that was there. It was in the right position
but pushed just slightly off. Live and learn....
Thanks,
-dan z-
Glad to be of service! (Vmm.) Yes, they can get knocked out of position.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Veni Vidi Vacuum [I came, I saw, It sucked] - ***@saslimited.demon.co.uk, 1998
NY
2018-03-13 17:22:39 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by slate_leeper
On Mon, 12 Mar 2018 16:43:46 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by slate_leeper
The memory card from my Canon camera, when inserted into the computer,
is now permanently write protected. This means that I can not delete
[]
Post by slate_leeper
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
You haven't knocked the tab on the side of the card have you? Some types
of card have a mechanical switch.
[]
Post by slate_leeper
Bingo. I didn't even know that was there. It was in the right position
but pushed just slightly off. Live and learn....
Thanks,
-dan z-
Glad to be of service! (Vmm.) Yes, they can get knocked out of position.
The worse situation is if the card goes write-protected as you are putting
it back in the camera. I've got into the habit of always checking that I can
take a test photo as soon as I replace the card after copying data off it.
Having the switch on the side, where it can slide to the locked position as
the card is being inserted, is a slight design fault.

I wonder how many people actually ever set the card to read-only and would
miss it if the feature was removed...
Paul
2018-03-13 22:55:17 UTC
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Post by NY
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by slate_leeper
On Mon, 12 Mar 2018 16:43:46 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by slate_leeper
The memory card from my Canon camera, when inserted into the computer,
is now permanently write protected. This means that I can not delete
[]
Post by slate_leeper
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
You haven't knocked the tab on the side of the card have you? Some types
of card have a mechanical switch.
[]
Post by slate_leeper
Bingo. I didn't even know that was there. It was in the right position
but pushed just slightly off. Live and learn....
Thanks,
-dan z-
Glad to be of service! (Vmm.) Yes, they can get knocked out of position.
The worse situation is if the card goes write-protected as you are
putting it back in the camera. I've got into the habit of always
checking that I can take a test photo as soon as I replace the card
after copying data off it. Having the switch on the side, where it can
slide to the locked position as the card is being inserted, is a slight
design fault.
I wonder how many people actually ever set the card to read-only and
would miss it if the feature was removed...
It's a continuation of features on more ancient storage media.

I have SCSI drives with a DIP switch bank on the drive, where
one of the switches is WP. It prevents writes to a SCSI data drive.
There have even been OSes that "tolerate" being read-only. Windows
isn't one of them.

Various floppy formats used to have density holes or
write protect sliders. The 1.44MB floppy in front of me,
has a slide switch for write protect.

The inclusion of such a feature on an SD, is just "copying"
the feature from history. It's of limited value in the real
world, because of the ease of moving the switch to the
other position, and overwriting the device. Of course,
with an SD, it also has a security suite, and that
could interfere with your fun too. I have no idea
what features it's got, where you would enter a password
and so on. But it got the name Secure Digital for some reason...

If ATA hard drives had a WP switch, I'd be in Heaven,
because it would mean I could install Windows on Drive X
and "switch off" Drive Y and Drive Z and know for a
fact that the MBR on Drive Y or Drive Z could not be
overwritten by the OS install. It's little known, that
if you switch off drives in the motherboard BIOS, it
makes no difference at all - an OS can switch them
on again. The beauty of WP switches, is they're electromechanical
and it's harder for shenanigans to happen. That's a feature
I miss, from having stopped buying SCSI drives.

Paul
Mark Lloyd
2018-03-14 16:44:59 UTC
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On 03/13/2018 05:55 PM, Paul wrote:

[snip]
Post by Paul
The beauty of WP switches, is they're electromechanical
and it's harder for shenanigans to happen. That's a feature
I miss, from having stopped buying SCSI drives.
   Paul
A fake WP switch isn't much better. The physical switch is just an input
to the computer (it knows you don't want writing, but it CHOOSES whether
or not to honor that). A real WP switch would actually prevent writing.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/

"I believe today that my conduct is in accordance with the will of the
Almighty Creator." -- Adolf Hitler, Mein Kampf, pp, 46
Paul
2018-03-14 18:55:11 UTC
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Post by Mark Lloyd
[snip]
Post by Paul
The beauty of WP switches, is they're electromechanical
and it's harder for shenanigans to happen. That's a feature
I miss, from having stopped buying SCSI drives.
Paul
A fake WP switch isn't much better. The physical switch is just an input
to the computer (it knows you don't want writing, but it CHOOSES whether
or not to honor that). A real WP switch would actually prevent writing.
True. You have to differentiate in each
case, what type you're dealing with.

The SCSI drive ones were for real. With the
values quite likely to be latched at powerup.

Paul
slate_leeper
2018-03-14 13:31:45 UTC
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Post by NY
The worse situation is if the card goes write-protected as you are putting
it back in the camera. I've got into the habit of always checking that I can
take a test photo as soon as I replace the card after copying data off it.
Having the switch on the side, where it can slide to the locked position as
the card is being inserted, is a slight design fault.
Interestingly, the camera seemed not to notice. While trying things I
moved the card back and forth several times. File delete worked while
it was in the camera only. That's why I thought it was a Windows
problem.

-dan z-
--
Someone who thinks logically provides
a nice contrast to the real world.
(Anonymous)
Mark Lloyd
2018-03-14 16:46:17 UTC
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On 03/14/2018 08:31 AM, slate_leeper wrote:

[snip]
Post by slate_leeper
Interestingly, the camera seemed not to notice. While trying things I
moved the card back and forth several times. File delete worked while
it was in the camera only. That's why I thought it was a Windows
problem.
-dan z-
My camera seems to ignore the WP switch too. That's one way I know it
wasn't a real one.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/

"I believe today that my conduct is in accordance with the will of the
Almighty Creator." -- Adolf Hitler, Mein Kampf, pp, 46
NY
2018-03-17 11:02:18 UTC
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Post by Mark Lloyd
[snip]
Post by slate_leeper
Interestingly, the camera seemed not to notice. While trying things I
moved the card back and forth several times. File delete worked while
it was in the camera only. That's why I thought it was a Windows
problem.
-dan z-
My camera seems to ignore the WP switch too. That's one way I know it
wasn't a real one.
My Nikon SLR and my various Canon compact cameras all refuse to take photos
if the WP switch on the SDHC card is in the Protect position. I hadn't
realised that some cameras allow writing even when the switch says no.
Mark Lloyd
2018-03-17 15:34:56 UTC
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On 03/17/2018 06:02 AM, NY wrote:

[snip]
Post by NY
Post by Mark Lloyd
My camera seems to ignore the WP switch too. That's one way I know it
wasn't a real one.
My Nikon SLR and my various Canon compact cameras all refuse to take
photos if the WP switch on the SDHC card is in the Protect position. I
hadn't realised that some cameras allow writing even when the switch
says no.
Mine is a Canon, about 10 years old.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/

"Lots of men who would not associate with infidels for fear of
contaminating their characters are not yet out of jail." [Lemuel K.
Washburn, _Is The Bible Worth Reading And Other Essays_, 1911]
NY
2018-03-17 19:58:15 UTC
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Post by Mark Lloyd
[snip]
Post by NY
Post by Mark Lloyd
My camera seems to ignore the WP switch too. That's one way I know it
wasn't a real one.
My Nikon SLR and my various Canon compact cameras all refuse to take
photos if the WP switch on the SDHC card is in the Protect position. I
hadn't realised that some cameras allow writing even when the switch says
no.
Mine is a Canon, about 10 years old.
I'll have to dig out my wife's 2003-vintage Canon SLR which she no longer
uses because she has upgraded to a more recent, more feature-rich Nikon. It
will be interesting to see whether that will write to a write-protected
card.
NY
2018-03-17 20:06:41 UTC
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Post by NY
Post by Mark Lloyd
[snip]
Post by NY
Post by Mark Lloyd
My camera seems to ignore the WP switch too. That's one way I know it
wasn't a real one.
My Nikon SLR and my various Canon compact cameras all refuse to take
photos if the WP switch on the SDHC card is in the Protect position. I
hadn't realised that some cameras allow writing even when the switch
says no.
Mine is a Canon, about 10 years old.
I'll have to dig out my wife's 2003-vintage Canon SLR which she no longer
uses because she has upgraded to a more recent, more feature-rich Nikon.
It will be interesting to see whether that will write to a write-protected
card.
Ah, bugger. No, I can't do that. It uses CF not SD cards so there is no
physical WP switch.

After missing several shots because I hadn't noticed that the WP switch had
got moved slightly in replacing the card in the camera, I now always look
for the error code in the display on my Nikon, and always try to take a test
photo on my Canon compacts which don't have an LCD display so the first you
know of the problem is an error on the viewfinder screen after taking a
photo and get a brief "cannot write to card" message.

These days there is a lot to be said for the firmware of camera only
checking the WP switch when you try to delete an already-taken photo (or try
to format the card) and not check it when taking a photo. Cards are so big
that taking the odd unwanted photo is the lesser evil than missing an
unrepeatable photo. Always assuming that you don't want to recover a photo
that you'd already deleted, in which case even taking another photo would
risk trashing the one that you want to undelete.

Auric__
2018-03-12 16:49:25 UTC
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Post by slate_leeper
The memory card from my Canon camera, when inserted into the computer,
is now permanently write protected. This means that I can not delete
picture files, as I have been doing for years.
How can I undo this? "Properties" shows no "security" tab at all for
setting permissions.
CompactFlash and SD cards are almost universally formatted to some version of
FAT, so there isn't a security tab because the file system doesn't support
any kind of security beyond "read-only" and "system".

Assuming J. P. Gilliver's suggestion doesn't help, I would assume the card is
failing and replace it. They have a finite lifespan, and generally fail to
read-only mode. Eventually you'll find that both your computer and your
camera are unable to use it at all.
--
Eight years involved with the nuclear industry have taught me that
when nothing can possibly go wrong and every avenue has been covered,
then is the time to buy a house on the next continent.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2018-03-12 16:58:27 UTC
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Post by Auric__
Post by slate_leeper
The memory card from my Canon camera, when inserted into the computer,
is now permanently write protected. This means that I can not delete
picture files, as I have been doing for years.
How can I undo this? "Properties" shows no "security" tab at all for
setting permissions.
CompactFlash and SD cards are almost universally formatted to some version of
FAT, so there isn't a security tab because the file system doesn't support
any kind of security beyond "read-only" and "system".
Assuming J. P. Gilliver's suggestion doesn't help, I would assume the card is
failing and replace it. They have a finite lifespan, and generally fail to
read-only mode. Eventually you'll find that both your computer and your
camera are unable to use it at all.
Yes: I forgot to ask, can you still delete from it in the camera, singly
or all images. And/or, can you _format_ it in the computer - or the
camera.
John
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

... the greatest musical festival in the world that doesn't involve mud.
- Eddie Mair, RT 2014/8/16-22
slate_leeper
2018-03-13 12:39:46 UTC
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On Mon, 12 Mar 2018 16:58:27 +0000, "J. P. Gilliver (John)"
Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Yes: I forgot to ask, can you still delete from it in the camera, singly
or all images. And/or, can you _format_ it in the computer - or the
camera.
John
Yes, it works normally in the camera. Of course there are over 1000
pictures there, so navigating thru them is quite a chore.

-dan z-
--
Someone who thinks logically provides
a nice contrast to the real world.
(Anonymous)
Ferman
2018-03-12 21:22:04 UTC
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Read my post.
I'll bet if you put it in a Win 7 PC and do the error-check it will
un-write-protect it. You may need an adapter SD to USB if your PC does
not have an SD slot.

I have to do this for a particular brand SanDisk flash drive once in a
while.
Post by slate_leeper
The memory card from my Canon camera, when inserted into the computer,
is now permanently write protected. This means that I can not delete
picture files, as I have been doing for years.
How can I undo this? "Properties" shows no "security" tab at all for
setting permissions.
-dan z-
NY
2018-03-13 17:26:40 UTC
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Post by Ferman
Read my post.
I'll bet if you put it in a Win 7 PC and do the error-check it will
un-write-protect it. You may need an adapter SD to USB if your PC does
not have an SD slot.
You may also need a USB-SD adaptor if the slot that is built into your
desktop or laptop PC decides to stop recognising that the card has been
inserted. My Win 7 desktop does this sometimes: it recognises the card until
it is removed and then won't see it again if it re-inserted until the PC is
rebooted. The drive is visible in Windows Explorer but the card is not
detected.
Ant
2018-03-14 00:23:48 UTC
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Post by NY
Post by Ferman
Read my post.
I'll bet if you put it in a Win 7 PC and do the error-check it will
un-write-protect it. You may need an adapter SD to USB if your PC does
not have an SD slot.
You may also need a USB-SD adaptor if the slot that is built into your
desktop or laptop PC decides to stop recognising that the card has been
inserted. My Win 7 desktop does this sometimes: it recognises the card until
it is removed and then won't see it again if it re-inserted until the PC is
rebooted. The drive is visible in Windows Explorer but the card is not
detected.
Have you checked with Windows' Disk Management as well?
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