Discussion:
Create Backup For XP
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XP4Me
2017-06-18 15:03:49 UTC
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Purchased a refurbished laptop with XP Pro installed.
Everything works.

I did a Macrium Reflect Image to a NAS and created a Rescue disk.

There is no Windows partition only the C:

Now I want to create backup dvds.

Is there a best way to do this ?

Please humor me and give me the simple steps to do this.

Anything else I need to do ?

Thank you.
Wolf K
2017-06-18 15:36:01 UTC
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Post by XP4Me
Purchased a refurbished laptop with XP Pro installed.
Everything works.
I did a Macrium Reflect Image to a NAS and created a Rescue disk.
C: is the "Windows partition". Maybe you mean rescue/repair partition?
These don't have letters. Open Control Panel, and select Administrative
tasks, then Disk Management to find out whether these partitions exist.
Post by XP4Me
Now I want to create backup dvds.
Is there a best way to do this ?
Depends what you want to preserve. If it's data, the simplest method is
to just burn the data files/folders onto the DVDs. Here are some dvd
burners (there are other sources for such software):

http://filehippo.com/search?q=dvd+burner

I used DeepBurner, and eventually paid for the Pro version, does the job
well enough for me. I would create suitably named folders first, and
move/copy the data into them. Easier to find the data you're looking for.
Post by XP4Me
Please humor me and give me the simple steps to do this.
Anything else I need to do ?
Take a break. :-)
Post by XP4Me
Thank you.
Yer welcome.
--
Best,
Wolf K
https://kirkwood40.blogspot.com
"As far as we know, there are no undetected bugs in our software."”
slate_leeper
2017-06-19 13:48:29 UTC
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Post by XP4Me
Purchased a refurbished laptop with XP Pro installed.
Everything works.
I did a Macrium Reflect Image to a NAS and created a Rescue disk.
I would suggest you keep this rescue disk, and perhaps make another
copy.

I had upgraded my Macrium to a later version, only to find that
restores done with the later version rescue disk did not result in a
bootable system. The same rescue disk did work with the backups
created with that version.

-dan z-
--
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Let the politicians know how you feel.
Join or donate to the NRA today!
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Gun control is like trying to reduce drunk driving by making it tougher for sober people to own cars.
Paul
2017-06-19 13:52:38 UTC
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Post by slate_leeper
Post by XP4Me
Purchased a refurbished laptop with XP Pro installed.
Everything works.
I did a Macrium Reflect Image to a NAS and created a Rescue disk.
I would suggest you keep this rescue disk, and perhaps make another
copy.
I had upgraded my Macrium to a later version, only to find that
restores done with the later version rescue disk did not result in a
bootable system. The same rescue disk did work with the backups
created with that version.
-dan z-
Did you use the boot repair in the rescue CD, on the broken case ?

I find the best order, for things like Windows 10, is to use the
Macrium Rescue CD repair first, followed by trying to get Windows
to repair it with the features on the Windows installer DVD. The
Macrium repair seldom fixes things on its own, but I notice
that (usually) the Windows repair is able to work with the
results and get it running again. It ends up being a two-step
process.

Paul
XP4Me
2017-06-19 16:57:06 UTC
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I am trying to create a Win XP Pro Installer DVD since the laptop came
preloaded and with no DVDs.

I would like to create a DVD (or set) that will boot from the DVD drive
and do a Windows Install with or without the currently installed apps is OK.

Some app that will compress the currently loaded drive info and write to
a DVD or set of DVDs to create a bootable DVD for a re-install..
Post by Paul
Did you use the boot repair in the rescue CD, on the broken case ?
I find the best order, for things like Windows 10, is to use the
Macrium Rescue CD repair first, followed by trying to get Windows
to repair it with the features on the Windows installer DVD. The
Macrium repair seldom fixes things on its own, but I notice
that (usually) the Windows repair is able to work with the
results and get it running again. It ends up being a two-step
process.
Paul
Paul
2017-06-19 17:30:25 UTC
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Post by XP4Me
I am trying to create a Win XP Pro Installer DVD since the laptop came
preloaded and with no DVDs.
I would like to create a DVD (or set) that will boot from the DVD drive
and do a Windows Install with or without the currently installed apps is OK.
Some app that will compress the currently loaded drive info and write to
a DVD or set of DVDs to create a bootable DVD for a re-install..
This is Pro SP2 English. You'd need to install SP3 after this.

Is the link still there ? Dunno.

https://ia801903.us.archive.org/31/items/en_winxp_pro_with_sp2.iso/en_winxp_pro_with_sp2.iso

Paul
Ken Blake
2017-06-19 18:35:14 UTC
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Post by XP4Me
I am trying to create a Win XP Pro Installer DVD since the laptop came
preloaded and with no DVDs.
I would like to create a DVD (or set) that will boot from the DVD drive
and do a Windows Install with or without the currently installed apps is OK.
Almost certainly the laptop came with a recovery partition in lieu of
a DVD. It probably also came with instructions on how to burn its
contents to a DVD, so you would not be up the creek without a paddle
if the drive died,

Burning it to a DVD should have been the first thing you did when you
got the computer. Since you apparently didn't, I urge you to do it
ASAP.
XP4Me
2017-06-20 16:07:46 UTC
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As I said only the C: partition. Implying NO recovery partition.
NO DVDs.
I got a great price and it all works and battery is in good shape.
So I need to do some work myself to get stabilized.

Seems nobody makes an app to directly make a recovery DVD set.
Or even an app that makes the files and supports burning to DVD.
Diesel
2017-06-25 03:22:19 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by XP4Me
I am trying to create a Win XP Pro Installer DVD since the laptop
came preloaded and with no DVDs.
I would like to create a DVD (or set) that will boot from the DVD
drive and do a Windows Install with or without the currently
installed apps is
OK.
Almost certainly the laptop came with a recovery partition in lieu
of a DVD. It probably also came with instructions on how to burn
its contents to a DVD, so you would not be up the creek without a
paddle if the drive died,
Only if left in a factory state, the OP indicates it has no secondary
partition. It may have been reloaded with a single partition...
Post by Ken Blake
Burning it to a DVD should have been the first thing you did when
you got the computer. Since you apparently didn't, I urge you to
do it ASAP.
They got it used. It may have been reloaded with a single partition.
--
https://tekrider.net/pages/david-brooks-stalker.php

'My kid had sex with your honor student.'
Paul
2017-06-19 16:57:39 UTC
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Post by XP4Me
Purchased a refurbished laptop with XP Pro installed.
Everything works.
I did a Macrium Reflect Image to a NAS and created a Rescue disk.
Now I want to create backup dvds.
Is there a best way to do this ?
Please humor me and give me the simple steps to do this.
Anything else I need to do ?
Thank you.
I had a chance to test this.

1) The optical disc set will not be integrated. Your
Macrium Rescue CD will be separate from the data discs.

2) You do your Macrium backup as normal, however you go
to the options panel in Macrium and set the "output data size"
to 4GB. I didn't optimize that, and that's just a guess at
a good size for a DVD.

3) My WinXP test disk was around 20GB in size, and I had the
compression in Macrium cranked up to high. I ended up
with four 4GB files and a single 2GB file (which likely
contains the Index, which is used during restore).

4) Now, at this point, the MRIMG files are stored on your
NAS or some hard drive.

5) Using the build-in Windows disc burning, drop a file onto
each blank DVD and burn as you normally work. I faked this
step using mkisofs. Because I'm not waiting 5*30 minutes
for my ratshit DVD blanks to burn.

6) OK, now I have the Macrium boot CD in hand, and five data discs.

What I noticed at this point, is Macrium would *not* play nice,
with a pretend 6 optical drive configuration. It seemed to be
insisting that each file it find, be on the original optical
drive. So I had to dump that config and try again.

I set up a one-optical-drive config, booted the Macrium CD and
browsed for my backup (on the optical drive). Of the optical
discs 0,1,2,3,4, I inserted disc 4 at this point, and requested
verify. I flipped in the discs one at a time, and that seemed to
work for verify.

You can use the test case, of booting the Macrium CD, then running
a verify, then inserting discs 4,0,1,2,3. If it accepts that process,
then chances are very very good, it'll do the actual restore to the
hard drive when you need it. This allows testing the restoration
procedure a little bit, without messing anything up.

For my WinXP test, after feeding the five images and
rebooting, WinXP promptly got a 7B STOP error. This was
to be expected, because for my test case, my WinXP restoration
drive was on an AHCI port, and not an IDE port, and WinXP
doesn't have an AHCI driver. So I consider the test a "success",
because it did try to boot, and it must have accessed the boot.ini
to get that far.

In general, I don't recommend DVD backup, because it's so slow.
I tried testing the Windows 7 build-in backup to DVD, and it took
over two hours, just to prep and burn the discs. So it's a painful
process. The procedure above with Macrium, does have the advantage
that the generation of the 4GB files is independent of the
burning of DVDs. But that's not saying much. It's still going to
take two to three hours that way. With the virtual test method
I was using the restore only took 4 minutes 30 seconds, so I
didn't have to wait too long.

I realize your NAS could crash, or it could catch file, or
the power supply in it could overvolt and ruin the hard drive.
If it was me, I'd simply get a USB hard drive, and put my
second copy of the OS on that. Then use the Macrium emergency
boot CD, and restore from the USB drive. You will suffer less
hair loss this way. You could just put the file you already
have on the NAS, onto the USB hard drive. USB hard drives are
available in 2.5" form factor now, with the largest 2.5" USB
drive being around 2TB and being 15mm high. (That's taller
than a laptop drive, and the drive inside those USB enclosures,
cannot be put in the laptop bay at some later date, because
the laptop bay is 9.5mm high, and these big drives are
15mm high.) That's if you wanted the least intrusive USB
storage solution (that used a hard drive).

Obviously, you can buy a Sandisk Extreme 128GB and put your
copy of WinXP backup on that. But you have to be drenched in money
to afford one of those. There is at least one USB3.1 SSD product,
that writes at 700MB/sec, and again, it's pointless for this
job, as the laptop likely only has USB2 and the restore
could only go at 30MB/sec. If you use the DVD method, the
restore might run at 6MB/sec.

Depending on the NIC on the laptop, if it was a GbE chip,
that might be the fastest restore path (from your NAS). Make
sure the Macrium Emergency CD, when booted, can see your NAS.
Make a new disc, with a later WinPE version, if the network
cannot be seen. The Macrium menu is quite deceiving, and it'll
take a few seconds to find where the "Network" entry is hidden.
I missed it the first time, and got one of my other Macrium CDs
to try and find it.

Paul
XP4Me
2017-06-20 16:01:01 UTC
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Thanks for all of that !!!

I just think that a DVD is the best way to store important stuff.

The laptop is USB2 only so ...

It is a Lenovo T500

It has
a PC Card slot.
1394 connector
SIM card slot
SD slot - full size
3 USB2 ports (one used for mouse)
DVD burner
250G HDD
3G RAM
Audio ports on the front.

Recommendations for ...
Would a PC Card to USB3 be full speed ?
1394 external drive suggestions ?
Will SIM card work ? Not sure if I have drivers for that.

How about an external blueray burner and double-sided disks.
(too expensive but just a thought)

I cannot find a user's manual for it.
I can only find a tech manual but it does not explain it well for a user.

There is a hole for something on the frame above the screen.
What is that for ?

The T500 comes in so many flavors that it is confusing to track down
what is what.

I set up the fingerprint scanner and it worked until I changed the
computer name so according to some instructions I found I deleted all
fingerprints and booted and re-did the fingerprint set up.
At that point I had to reboot and after it came up the mouse pad and
little red joystick would not work so I plugged in a USB mouse for the
first time and the USB mouse got me going again. Now to the pad and
joystick problem. Where is that ?
Paul
2017-06-20 16:17:21 UTC
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Post by XP4Me
Thanks for all of that !!!
I just think that a DVD is the best way to store important stuff.
The laptop is USB2 only so ...
It is a Lenovo T500
It has
a PC Card slot.
1394 connector
SIM card slot
SD slot - full size
3 USB2 ports (one used for mouse)
DVD burner
250G HDD
3G RAM
Audio ports on the front.
Recommendations for ...
Would a PC Card to USB3 be full speed ?
1394 external drive suggestions ?
Will SIM card work ? Not sure if I have drivers for that.
How about an external blueray burner and double-sided disks.
(too expensive but just a thought)
I cannot find a user's manual for it.
I can only find a tech manual but it does not explain it well for a user.
There is a hole for something on the frame above the screen.
What is that for ?
The T500 comes in so many flavors that it is confusing to track down
what is what.
I set up the fingerprint scanner and it worked until I changed the
computer name so according to some instructions I found I deleted all
fingerprints and booted and re-did the fingerprint set up.
At that point I had to reboot and after it came up the mouse pad and
little red joystick would not work so I plugged in a USB mouse for the
first time and the USB mouse got me going again. Now to the pad and
joystick problem. Where is that ?
I don't think the PCCard slot is viable for high speed transfer.
It would be a bad joke, for USB3 purposes.

The 1394 is 50MB/sec theoretical, and 40MB/sec best case.
I own two enclosures, and using just one of them, I get 30MB/sec.
That's about the same as a USB2 drive will do, so there's
really no advantage to using Firewire 400 for this. Firewire 800
exists and was deployed a bit, but the connector is also
a bit different. Part of it having to do with trying to
stop the "blown port" problem. Firewire 800 would be worthwhile,
at least compared to USB2, but other standards are now better
than either of those.

As for the rest of your I/O experiments, carry on :-)

The best thing for Thinkpads, is to find the web site
of someone who really likes them, and has written up
all the stuff you want to know. You can find obscure
topics, such as replacing the optical drive, with
a carrier with a hard drive in it. So these things
do have features that are a bit different than other
manufacturers.

Paul
Bill in Co
2017-06-21 04:15:01 UTC
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Post by XP4Me
Thanks for all of that !!!
I just think that a DVD is the best way to store important stuff.
The laptop is USB2 only so ...
It is a Lenovo T500
It has
a PC Card slot.
1394 connector
SIM card slot
SD slot - full size
3 USB2 ports (one used for mouse)
DVD burner
250G HDD
3G RAM
Audio ports on the front.
Recommendations for ...
Would a PC Card to USB3 be full speed ?
1394 external drive suggestions ?
Will SIM card work ? Not sure if I have drivers for that.
How about an external blueray burner and double-sided disks.
(too expensive but just a thought)
I cannot find a user's manual for it.
I can only find a tech manual but it does not explain it well for a user.
There is a hole for something on the frame above the screen.
What is that for ?
The T500 comes in so many flavors that it is confusing to track down
what is what.
I set up the fingerprint scanner and it worked until I changed the
computer name so according to some instructions I found I deleted all
fingerprints and booted and re-did the fingerprint set up.
At that point I had to reboot and after it came up the mouse pad and
little red joystick would not work so I plugged in a USB mouse for the
first time and the USB mouse got me going again. Now to the pad and
joystick problem. Where is that ?
Why don't you consider getting an external HD enclosure that has a USB2
port. Sure seems like a better idea to me than having to rely on a bunch of
DVDs for backup purposes. (There are several to choose from). Plus a hard
drive is rewritable and faster than DVDs.
D***@MadCow.net
2017-06-21 20:18:49 UTC
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On Tue, 20 Jun 2017 22:15:01 -0600, "Bill in Co"
Post by Bill in Co
Post by XP4Me
Thanks for all of that !!!
I just think that a DVD is the best way to store important stuff.
The laptop is USB2 only so ...
It is a Lenovo T500
It has
a PC Card slot.
1394 connector
SIM card slot
SD slot - full size
3 USB2 ports (one used for mouse)
DVD burner
250G HDD
3G RAM
Audio ports on the front.
Recommendations for ...
Would a PC Card to USB3 be full speed ?
1394 external drive suggestions ?
Will SIM card work ? Not sure if I have drivers for that.
How about an external blueray burner and double-sided disks.
(too expensive but just a thought)
I cannot find a user's manual for it.
I can only find a tech manual but it does not explain it well for a user.
There is a hole for something on the frame above the screen.
What is that for ?
The T500 comes in so many flavors that it is confusing to track down
what is what.
I set up the fingerprint scanner and it worked until I changed the
computer name so according to some instructions I found I deleted all
fingerprints and booted and re-did the fingerprint set up.
At that point I had to reboot and after it came up the mouse pad and
little red joystick would not work so I plugged in a USB mouse for the
first time and the USB mouse got me going again. Now to the pad and
joystick problem. Where is that ?
Why don't you consider getting an external HD enclosure that has a USB2
port. Sure seems like a better idea to me than having to rely on a bunch of
DVDs for backup purposes. (There are several to choose from). Plus a hard
drive is rewritable and faster than DVDs.
I bought one of these a few years ago. It was cheaper then but really
works well. Put any SATA revision I/II/III (1.5/3.0/6.0 Gbps) drive
in it. I liked the idea of a built in fan to cool the drive.

StarTech.com USB 3.0 to 3.5-Inch SATA III Hard Drive Enclosure with
Fan and Upright Design

https://www.amazon.com/StarTech-com-3-5-Inch-Enclosure-Upright-S3510BMU33B/dp/B00K3HEYA2/ref=sr_1_10?ie=UTF8&qid=1498075813&sr=8-10&keywords=startech+usb+3+external+hard+drive+enclosure

DC
XP4Me
2017-06-21 23:47:58 UTC
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TRAVELING.
I can drop a DVD bag with DVD and suffer not damage.

Try that with a HDD or SSD. Packaging to bulky too.

Pen drive too easy to erase on or not on purpose.

DVDs best for storage.
J. P. Gilliver (John)
2017-06-22 07:01:39 UTC
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Post by XP4Me
TRAVELING.
I can drop a DVD bag with DVD and suffer not damage.
Agreed.
Post by XP4Me
Try that with a HDD or SSD. Packaging to bulky too.
Agreed (though some SSD enthusiasts might argue).
Post by XP4Me
Pen drive too easy to erase on or not on purpose.
Agreed.
Post by XP4Me
DVDs best for storage.
Not proven. I have some CDRs that are some years old and won't read (and
no, they weren't written at 52x, nor have they been left exposed to
light); I presume DVDRs to be _more_ prone to deterioration (I have at
least one _video_ one that is now problematic). Sure, you can get
archive-quality ones, but I'm still to be convinced (and I think they
cost an arm and a leg too).

I don't know what _is_ best; I incline to HDDs (with your caveat re
physical fragility), but will admit that's mainly due to convenience
rather than experience.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/<1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)***@T+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Look out for #1. Don't step in #2 either.
Ian Jackson
2017-06-22 07:36:13 UTC
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Post by J. P. Gilliver (John)
Post by XP4Me
TRAVELING.
I can drop a DVD bag with DVD and suffer not damage.
Agreed.
Post by XP4Me
Try that with a HDD or SSD. Packaging to bulky too.
Agreed (though some SSD enthusiasts might argue).
Post by XP4Me
Pen drive too easy to erase on or not on purpose.
Agreed.
Post by XP4Me
DVDs best for storage.
Not proven. I have some CDRs that are some years old and won't read
(and no, they weren't written at 52x, nor have they been left exposed
to light); I presume DVDRs to be _more_ prone to deterioration (I have
at least one _video_ one that is now problematic). Sure, you can get
archive-quality ones, but I'm still to be convinced (and I think they
cost an arm and a leg too).
I don't know what _is_ best; I incline to HDDs (with your caveat re
physical fragility), but will admit that's mainly due to convenience
rather than experience.
The easiest way of backing up your hard drive is simply to clone it to
another hard drive. However, the OP seems determined to find reasons not
to do the obvious.

As the PC in question is a laptop, it presumably has a 2.5 inch drive.
These are small and light, and if he is worried about it being damaged,
can be stored in some suitable accident-proof packaging. If he is REALLY
worried, he can make several cloned copies. Of course, the backup drive
can also be a 3.5 inch drive, which will certainly hurt more if you drop
it on your foot.
--
Ian
Mayayana
2017-06-22 11:50:10 UTC
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"Ian Jackson" <***@g3ohx.co.uk> wrote

| The easiest way of backing up your hard drive is simply to clone it to
| another hard drive. However, the OP seems determined to find reasons not
| to do the obvious.
|
Your opinion is not necessarily "obvious" to others,
however strange that might seem. :)

Isn't the best backup what works? If you lose your
house today, can you recover your data? Can you also
recover it in a way that's usable? (It's great that you
have your XP backed up to hard disk with AutoCAD
installed, but can you boot that disk in a modern
computer if your computer dies? Have you planned for
that?)

I've used disk image backup for many years. I put
images on CDs/DVDs and store copies in a safe deposit
box. I also, always, build desktops with two disks and
use the second as mostly redundant backup with data
and disk images on both disks, each of which have several
partitions to organize that data. I use old hard disks
to store large amounts of the same data, but only
because I have them sitting around. I also back up
basic data regularly to DVD. (How could anyone say that's
inferior? It costs about 30 cents and travels well.)
I have a specific partition for that basic data. It includes
things like business records and coding I've done. It
doesn't include bulky things like pictures and technical
reference.

All of that works very well for me. I've never gone back
to a CD from the 90s or 00s and found that I couldn't read
it. On the other hand, I very rarely need anything from
that time that's not on more recent backups. I would
*never* put any data only on C drive. If it's on C drive
at all that's only because it's not in the way. I have
it duplicated elsewhere on both hard disks.

Cloning your hard disk to an external one might be easiest
for you, but it's not terribly dependable by itself and not
very efficient. It's just a primitive form of RAID; a simple
method for people who don't want to figure out what
they actually need to back up, and who think System Restore
is a form of backup. The OS itself is a bloated, brittle container.
There's no reason to be backing up 1 GB of photos and docs
in a 10-20 GB structure of OS libraries that requires special
care to access. That's like backing up your will in a locked
suitcase full of junk mail. Lose the key (the hardware the
OS was installed to) and you'll need some expertise and time
to get at what's inside. Even then, you'll still need to weed
through junk mail that shouldn't have been in the backup.
Why back up your work DOCs along with the entire System32
folder? It makes no sense in practical terms. It *only* makes
sense if you don't want to undertake a more thorough and
systematic approach to backup, and if your data is not important.
(I don't mean that snidely. For many people I know, their
data is *not* important. When their computer fails they only
care about getting back online to check their gmail. That's
where their grandchild's latest photo is. They wouldn't
even know how to put that photo on their computer. For
those people, a spare hard disk when malware hits might
be a good idea.)
Paul
2017-06-22 11:57:07 UTC
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Post by Mayayana
| The easiest way of backing up your hard drive is simply to clone it to
| another hard drive. However, the OP seems determined to find reasons not
| to do the obvious.
|
Your opinion is not necessarily "obvious" to others,
however strange that might seem. :)
Isn't the best backup what works? If you lose your
house today, can you recover your data? Can you also
recover it in a way that's usable? (It's great that you
have your XP backed up to hard disk with AutoCAD
installed, but can you boot that disk in a modern
computer if your computer dies? Have you planned for
that?)
I've used disk image backup for many years. I put
images on CDs/DVDs and store copies in a safe deposit
box. I also, always, build desktops with two disks and
use the second as mostly redundant backup with data
and disk images on both disks, each of which have several
partitions to organize that data. I use old hard disks
to store large amounts of the same data, but only
because I have them sitting around. I also back up
basic data regularly to DVD. (How could anyone say that's
inferior? It costs about 30 cents and travels well.)
I have a specific partition for that basic data. It includes
things like business records and coding I've done. It
doesn't include bulky things like pictures and technical
reference.
All of that works very well for me. I've never gone back
to a CD from the 90s or 00s and found that I couldn't read
it. On the other hand, I very rarely need anything from
that time that's not on more recent backups. I would
*never* put any data only on C drive. If it's on C drive
at all that's only because it's not in the way. I have
it duplicated elsewhere on both hard disks.
Cloning your hard disk to an external one might be easiest
for you, but it's not terribly dependable by itself and not
very efficient. It's just a primitive form of RAID; a simple
method for people who don't want to figure out what
they actually need to back up, and who think System Restore
is a form of backup. The OS itself is a bloated, brittle container.
There's no reason to be backing up 1 GB of photos and docs
in a 10-20 GB structure of OS libraries that requires special
care to access. That's like backing up your will in a locked
suitcase full of junk mail. Lose the key (the hardware the
OS was installed to) and you'll need some expertise and time
to get at what's inside. Even then, you'll still need to weed
through junk mail that shouldn't have been in the backup.
Why back up your work DOCs along with the entire System32
folder? It makes no sense in practical terms. It *only* makes
sense if you don't want to undertake a more thorough and
systematic approach to backup, and if your data is not important.
(I don't mean that snidely. For many people I know, their
data is *not* important. When their computer fails they only
care about getting back online to check their gmail. That's
where their grandchild's latest photo is. They wouldn't
even know how to put that photo on their computer. For
those people, a spare hard disk when malware hits might
be a good idea.)
I found a variation of cloning, worked for another poster.

I had him clone the C: partition from his original
drive, shrink it down, then create a D: partition to
hold regular backups.

(Backup drive, can be removed from USB enclosure in an emergency
and re-inserted into the machine...)

+-----+------------+------------------------------------+
| MBR | Windows C: | Data D: to hold regular backups |
+-----+------------+------------------------------------+

If the original drive is toast, he can insert that drive
and use the OS on it in the regular way.

And if that drive remains in the USB enclosure, the much
larger D: partition holds Macrium backups.

It gives the best of both worlds.

Paul
Mayayana
2017-06-24 13:56:25 UTC
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"Paul" <***@needed.invalid> wrote

| I found a variation of cloning, worked for another poster.
|
| I had him clone the C: partition from his original
| drive, shrink it down, then create a D: partition to
| hold regular backups.
|
| (Backup drive, can be removed from USB enclosure in an emergency
| and re-inserted into the machine...)
|
| +-----+------------+------------------------------------+
|| MBR | Windows C: | Data D: to hold regular backups |
| +-----+------------+------------------------------------+
|
| If the original drive is toast, he can insert that drive
| and use the OS on it in the regular way.
|
| And if that drive remains in the USB enclosure, the much
| larger D: partition holds Macrium backups.
|
| It gives the best of both worlds.
|

Isn't that disk imaging? If two disks both have
images on data partitions then a ready-to-go
C drive on the second disk is not really necessary.
It won't be up-to-date in terms of app data, so
there will still be the need to refresh the OS
and refresh the data separately.

I keep images on data partition on both disks.
I could put one or more primary partitions in front
on the second disk for OS backups. In fact, I do
do that. But I only use them as space holders. If
I ever need to boot from the second disk I'll just
overwrite the first partition with an image and copy
over my latest data backup.
Paul
2017-06-24 14:23:39 UTC
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Post by Mayayana
| I found a variation of cloning, worked for another poster.
|
| I had him clone the C: partition from his original
| drive, shrink it down, then create a D: partition to
| hold regular backups.
|
| (Backup drive, can be removed from USB enclosure in an emergency
| and re-inserted into the machine...)
|
| +-----+------------+------------------------------------+
|| MBR | Windows C: | Data D: to hold regular backups |
| +-----+------------+------------------------------------+
|
| If the original drive is toast, he can insert that drive
| and use the OS on it in the regular way.
|
| And if that drive remains in the USB enclosure, the much
| larger D: partition holds Macrium backups.
|
| It gives the best of both worlds.
|
Isn't that disk imaging? If two disks both have
images on data partitions then a ready-to-go
C drive on the second disk is not really necessary.
It won't be up-to-date in terms of app data, so
there will still be the need to refresh the OS
and refresh the data separately.
I keep images on data partition on both disks.
I could put one or more primary partitions in front
on the second disk for OS backups. In fact, I do
do that. But I only use them as space holders. If
I ever need to boot from the second disk I'll just
overwrite the first partition with an image and copy
over my latest data backup.
It's cloning and backups on the same disk.

The reason for having the OS image C: on the drive, is so
you can insert the drive inside your desktop and "dial out"
in an emergency. It's prefaced on the enclosure being easy
to open, and move the drive inside the PC. We're not talking
about a Seagate or WDC USB drive, but a third-party enclosure
(or even a USB dock for that matter).

Whereas the D: partition, occupying about 90% of the drive,
holds regular backups, If you need to restore a backup from D:
using your Macrium CD, to the existing internal drive, you can.

Part of this is prefaced on "confidence building". Inserting
the drive with that emergency copy of C: , gets you back on
your feet, and ready to make plans. Whereas if your PC
just tips over, and you have your backup drive in hand, and
no plan, it's going to be a much more aggravating process.
Maybe, for example, you have an important email to send that morning
and no time for "geeky procedures", just inserting the drive
and using the C: you left on it, has its advantages. Leaving time
later in the day for a proper repair to the original drive.

There will, of course, be people who cannot handle moving a
drive from an external enclosure, inside their PC. Or there
will be people who don't know what a boot order is, and your
best attempts to teach them backup and restore, will be wasted.
So lots of these ideas, are expecting a certain level of
proficiency.

Paul
Shadow
2017-06-23 16:21:52 UTC
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Post by XP4Me
Purchased a refurbished laptop with XP Pro installed.
Everything works.
I did a Macrium Reflect Image to a NAS and created a Rescue disk.
Now I want to create backup dvds.
Is there a best way to do this ?
Please humor me and give me the simple steps to do this.
Anything else I need to do ?
Thank you.
Win XP SP3 Pro fully updated, all drivers installed, all my
most used apps, including Firefox, Thunderbird, LibreOffice and VLC.
Clonezilla put it into an under 4GB image which I burned to a
DVD, which I successfully restored from a USB-booted Clonezilla after
formatting the HD and writing trash to it.
For data backups I use FreeFileSync (beware, this one is
semi-optional adware, all the other apps mentioned are freeware)
HTH
[]'s
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