Discussion:
Updates fail
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Seymore4Head
2017-08-07 15:14:09 UTC
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A few months ago I had a formatted my SSD drive and re installed
Windows7. The automatic updates failed a few times and I had to go
though a reverting process. I turned off automatic updates.

I turned automatic updates on last night and it installed about 180
updates. Well half of them failed including SP1.

It seems like formatting drive is something I am going to have to do
anyway to fix this.

When I formatted the drive, I used the same disk and had the exact
same hardware that had been updated regularly without a problem.
GlowingBlueMist
2017-08-07 15:31:37 UTC
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Post by Seymore4Head
A few months ago I had a formatted my SSD drive and re installed
Windows7. The automatic updates failed a few times and I had to go
though a reverting process. I turned off automatic updates.
I turned automatic updates on last night and it installed about 180
updates. Well half of them failed including SP1.
It seems like formatting drive is something I am going to have to do
anyway to fix this.
When I formatted the drive, I used the same disk and had the exact
same hardware that had been updated regularly without a problem.
You might try to do a few, as in 5 or less at a time.

On my system I have found mixing "net" anything updates with any other
update can cause both to fail, including trying to do two different
"net" updates at a time. Seems those .net updates work best if run all
by themselves, if they work at all.

I've resorted to doing the updates in clusters of 5 or so and any that
fail get left behind until the entire update list is finished. Then I
reboot the system, even if none of the prior updates asked for a reboot,
and do another update search. Many times the failed updates are not in
the new list as they were actually part of one of the other updates that
did work. Then I start a new cluster of 5 updates until I get to the
end of the list again and reboot, look for new updates, etc.
Mike Tomlinson
2017-08-07 16:18:35 UTC
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Post by Seymore4Head
I turned automatic updates on last night and it installed about 180
updates. Well half of them failed including SP1.
It'll work next time around.
--
(\_/)
(='.'=) "Between two evils, I always pick
(")_(") the one I never tried before." - Mae West
Paul
2017-08-07 16:29:56 UTC
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Post by Seymore4Head
A few months ago I had a formatted my SSD drive and re installed
Windows7. The automatic updates failed a few times and I had to go
though a reverting process. I turned off automatic updates.
I turned automatic updates on last night and it installed about 180
updates. Well half of them failed including SP1.
It seems like formatting drive is something I am going to have to do
anyway to fix this.
When I formatted the drive, I used the same disk and had the exact
same hardware that had been updated regularly without a problem.
You should join Book Of The Month club,
because you'd have your book by now.

*******

You'd want to install SP1 first. There's no point running WU when
the original version of Windows 7 is no longer supported. That's
the *first* update that goes in. Ordinarily, people would just
download the Win7 SP1 installer DVD and do the install from there,
as that avoids this step entirely. The Heidoc URL generator, can
make a URL to help you get a download like that.

You can use the Catalog server to get a copy of SP1. When some of
the old updates go missing, this is how you can get them.

http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com

Search terms: "windows 7 service pack 1"

http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=windows%207%20service%20pack%201

Windows 7 Service Pack 1 for Windows 7 Service Packs 5/31/2011 912.4 MB
x64-based Systems (KB976932)

Windows 7 Service Pack 1 for Windows 7 Service Packs 5/31/2011 541.9 MB
x86-based Systems (KB976932)

In the old days, before the Dark Times, you could get SP1 this way.
And it may still be worthwhile doing it this way. Notice how Microsoft
goes for "Maximum Aggravation" by listing a bunch of irrelevant files
first, before getting to the ones that most users need. I reformatted
this stuff in a previous posting, so I didn't have to redo it. The two
with the arrows, are for a 64-bit or 32-bit OS install respectively.

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?FamilyID=c3202ce6-4056-4059-8a1b-3a9b77cdfdda

7601.17514.101119-1850_Update_Sp_Wave1-GRMSP1.1_DVD.iso 1.0 GB

Windows_Win7SP1. ... .AMD64CHK.Symbols.msi 262.0 MB
Windows_Win7SP1. ... .AMD64FRE.Symbols.msi 287.0 MB
Windows_Win7SP1. ... .IA64CHK.Symbols.msi 241.0 MB
Windows_Win7SP1. ... .IA64FRE.Symbols.msi 193.0 MB
Windows_Win7SP1. ... .X86CHK.Symbols.msi 294.0 MB
Windows_Win7SP1. ... .X86FRE.Symbols.msi 330.0 MB

windows6.1-KB976932-IA64.exe 511.0 MB
windows6.1-KB976932-X64.exe 903.0 MB <------
windows6.1-KB976932-X86.exe 537.0 MB <------

Wsusoffline can be used to generate a list of updates
too, but it has its own problems. Namely, wuauserv goes nuts
just as easily during a Wsusoffline run (to install updates)
as a regular WU session would do. Virtually nothing in
this business "just works". Every step is a PITA. Maybe after
WU starts working, you can switch over to running Wsusoffline
on a USB stick (prepared on another computer perhaps).

*******

OK, once the OS claims to be at SP1, we can work on WU next.
The first one is a tiny servicing stack update. The second
one is 500MB and will take a while to download. The second
one is an unnecessary Cumulative that has a patch for WU
sandwiched in it. It would have been more human friendly
to just provide the goods, so a user could "walk away" from this
mess later and let the automation take care of it. But nooooo...
said Microsoft, let's use "Maximum Misery" as our motto.

http://catalog.update.microsoft.com/v7/site/Search.aspx?q=3020369

http://catalog.update.microsoft.com/v7/site/Search.aspx?q=3125574

These MRU files, some of them allow skipping a reboot until
a bunch are done, and when the second one is done, you can ask
it to reboot at that point. You just double click the MRU file,
to kick off the WUSA installer.

*******

What should happen at this point, is there is a *chance* that WU
will work. And, you're at SP1. If you're really lucky, WU will
show a bunch of updates.

*******

You could clean out C:\Windows\SoftwareDistribution before running
Windows Update. That sometimes helps. After the '574 update, it
should only take about five minutes for the update list to appear.
I generally clean that out, using a Linux boot CD and Terminal.
(Their equivalent of Command Prompt.) Just to make it easy.

Examples of the "Windows way" of doing it, are shown here. I
sometimes edit these scripts and remove the bits I don't
like, and keep the other bits. This should have a step in
it for cleaning SoftwareDistribution.

https://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/91738-windows-update-reset.html

This step is only necessary, if the "history" shows a continuing
hopeless trail of "fails". If the plumbing is jammed, you'll not
make any forward progress until some sort of cleaning is done.

I *have* installed all the updates on these OSes *manually*, using
MBSA 2.3 (baseline security analyzer) and catalog.update.microsoft.com.
That's over a hundred downloads. It takes *hours* to do that, but, it
will eventually succeed. Some hair loss could be an unpleasant
side effect. My vision was getting just a little bit blurry
near the end.

*******

This person does this kind of stuff too, and offers good advice.
If '574 didn't install, you'd check for the Servicing Stack updates,
whatever was currently available. He is using '605 which is the
Cumulative after the '574 I tested with. The catalog.update.microsoft.com
entries for those two, list almost identical file sizes.

http://wu.krelay.de/en/

*******

Those are just some of the ingredients.

You know, I even got Windows Update to work on Vista SP2. But,
it took me three attempts, and on the third attempt, I beat the
sucker. There was a lot of hair loss for that one. Vista is much
worse to fix, than Win7. I don't think the looping behavior on an
unpatched Vista, ever stops. That's how miserable it is.

Have fun,
Paul
Ken
2017-08-07 19:23:01 UTC
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Post by Seymore4Head
A few months ago I had a formatted my SSD drive and re installed
Windows7. The automatic updates failed a few times and I had to go
though a reverting process. I turned off automatic updates.
I turned automatic updates on last night and it installed about 180
updates. Well half of them failed including SP1.
It seems like formatting drive is something I am going to have to do
anyway to fix this.
When I formatted the drive, I used the same disk and had the exact
same hardware that had been updated regularly without a problem.
Could it be you have encountered the problem described below? I had
such a problem and the fix worked.

https://www.sevenforums.com/windows-updates-activation/402498-stuck-checking-updates.html
Ken Springer
2017-08-19 15:10:48 UTC
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Post by Seymore4Head
A few months ago I had a formatted my SSD drive and re installed
Windows7. The automatic updates failed a few times and I had to go
though a reverting process. I turned off automatic updates.
I turned automatic updates on last night and it installed about 180
updates. Well half of them failed including SP1.
It seems like formatting drive is something I am going to have to do
anyway to fix this.
When I formatted the drive, I used the same disk and had the exact
same hardware that had been updated regularly without a problem.
I've seen this a lot, and I don't remember the following method to have
ever failed me. Even when there's been around 230 updates to install.

Your computer simply fails to install a single update, or installs some
updates and fails to install the remaining updates.

Open the Start Menu, is there the little yellow shield down there that
indicates there are updates waiting to be installed?

If so, turn the computer off so the updates will install. Not a
restart, *turn* *it* *off!*

Turn it back on, start the updates again.

For me, this happens just once or twice. Then all the updates will install.

When you boot for what you will probably think is the last time, you
should have a message that says "No more updates" to install. Don't
believe it!!

Force a manual check for updates, odds are you will get more updates to
install.

Do not stop doing the update process until the *manual* check for
updates says there are not updates to install.

My theory is, one or more of the updates that fail needs to have one or
more of the updates installed that are indicated by the yellow shield.

It could be one or more of those "waiting to be installed" updates are
the individual ones listed in previous posts. Dunno, but I didn't spend
the time Googling for them. I spent that time doing something else. <G>
--
Ken
Mac OS X 10.11.6
Firefox 53.0.2 (64 bit)
Thunderbird 52.0
"My brain is like lightning, a quick flash
and it's gone!"
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